Posts Tagged ‘yogurt’

Foods That Will Help Bad Breath

Monday, March 15th, 2010

cinnamon bad breath

Some foods that are notorious for causing halitosis are garlic, onions, curry, fish and cheese.  Therefore, you’re going to want to freshen your mouth after eating these.  You also need to freshen your mouth once every 30-60 minutes until the breath offending-food is out of your bloodstream- sometimes this takes up to 24 hours!  It isn’t a good idea to brush your teeth that often, so trying some foods that banish halitosis may be just what the dentist ordered.

Foods that can fix bad breath:

1) Lemons- These are easy to find in restaurants, bars, etc.  Lemon-flavored candies can work as well as normal lemons, and are more easily portable.

2) Green garnishes (i.e. parsley, basil, and rosemary) - A garnish doesn’t always just serve as a decoration.  The meals that have garnish often have a lot of onions and garlic–thus needing a breath freshener afterward.  If you chew on a parsley’s sprigs, it releases breath-freshening oils. 

3)  Crisp and fresh foods like apples, firm pears, carrots, jicama are all high in fiber, plus chewing bumps up the productive of saliva (functions like a scrubbing rinse inside the oral cavity). 

4) Crunchy spices like anise, coriander, cardamom, and fennel seeds are available in many grocery stores.  Try getting these spices, mixing equal parts together in a covered bowl, and keep them around for mealtime.  If you chew on a few seeds here and there, enough oil should be released to freshen your breath after eating.  They taste good, as well.

5)  Mint sprigs/cinnamon sticks (cinnamon/mint gum, etc.)- These especially help against onion and garlic.  Cinnamon, with its essential oils, also helps kill various types of oral bacteria.  Gum without sugar is less likely to cause cavities and fuel the bad breath-causing bacteria. 

6) Berries/yogurt- Eat these foods to prevent bad breath…if you eat half of one cup of plain and sugarless yogurt twice a day, this can lower the levels of hydrogen sulfide in your mouth.  The same goes with berries, melons, oranges, and other foods high in Vitamin C- they help kill smelly bacteria in the oral cavity.  Try having a cup of fruit with yogurt twice a day, and this should help get rid of the bad breath.

Last but not least, practice good oral care, and this will decrease your “Real Age” as much as 6.4 years!

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Yogurt: Tooth Decay, Gum Disease and Bad Breath Cure

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

sugarless yogurt

According to Japanese research, sugarless yogurt can serve as another remedy for bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease.  Yogurt had allegedly reduced the levels of hydrogen suphide (a primary cause of halitosis) in 80% of participants in the study conducted by the International Association for Dental Research.  The plaque and gum disease levels were also noticeably lower among those who ate the yogurt. The main bacteria that help reduce bad breath are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

The study group of volunteers ate 90 grams of yogurt every day for six weeks, while maintaining a strict diet, medication intake, and oral hygiene routine. 

People should consider having sugar-free yogurt as a healthy snack, since sugary snacks rank high in causing tooth decay.  According to statistics, 1/4 people have chronic bad breath, and 19/20 have gum disease sometime in their lives!  By cutting down on the consumption of sugary snacks and chocolate and adopting a good oral hygiene routine, one can start adopting better oral health.

Source: BBC News

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Probiotics, Probiotic Supplements, Oral Probiotics

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

Not only do probiotics have various health benefits for your immune system and entire body, but they can also stop bad breath (halitosis). Extensive research has been done to look into the role of various probiotic strains; so far, positive results have been found.

If you’re serious about getting rid of bad breath, try the Streptococcus salivarius K12 probiotic strain. It is one of the best natural remedies for bad breath. This good bacterial strain tends to be found in high amounts on the tongues of healthy individuals.

Also, if you have a coated/white tongue, probiotics can help you get rid of that. Dry mouth or a bacterial infection can cause you to have a white coating on your tongue. You can also try a tongue scraper.

If you determine the root cause of bad breath, this will tell you how effective probiotics will likely be. Bad breath can be caused by an issue in both your oral health and gastrointestinal health. Probiotics help the bad breath that is caused by harmful strains of bacteria in your mouth, throat, and gastrointestinal region. An imbalance of oral flora often can cause bad breath, and tongue coating in younger people is a common cause bad breath. As people get older, they tend to have a coated tongue as well as other periodontal (gum) diseases that can cause halitosis. Other common causes can be: dental problems, gum disease, certain foods, alcohol, dry mouth, cigarettes, dieting, and other diseases. Obviously, if you have a serious disease, probiotics may not be enough to get rid of your bad breath problem. You may require other medical care.

When researched, good bacteria found in the human mouth included the following different phyla:

* Firmicutes – This included members of the genus Streptococcus, Gemella, Eubacterium, Selenomonas and Veillonella.
* Actinobacteria – Including members of Actinomyces, Atopobium, Rothia
* Proteobacteria – Including members of Neisseria, Eikenella, Campylobacter
* Bacteroidetes – Including members of Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga
* Fusobacteria – Including members of Fusobacterium, Leptotrichia
* TM7 phylum (there are no cultivable representatives for this one)

Streptococcus mitis was the species found the most in the human mouth.

As far as the bad breath culprits, these are the bad bacteria types:

Solobacterium moorei
Granulicatella elegens
Eubacterium species
Firmicutes species
Unidentified oral bacterium
Porphyromonas species
Staphylococcus warneri
Dialister species
Prevotella intermedia

Sources:

1. Haraszthy VI,Zambon JJ,Sreenivasan PK, Zambon MM, Gerber D,Rego R, Parker C. Identification of Oral Bacteria Species Associated with Halitosis. American Dental Association Volume 138 Number 8, pp 1113-1120. 2007

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Oral Probiotics

Monday, May 11th, 2009

Oral probiotics are living microorganisms that, if in large numbers, can provide various health benefits. Evidence has found that it is very likely that taking probiotics has a positive effect on one’s overall health, especially gastrointestinal health, oral health, and the immune system.

Oral probiotics can protect the mouth, gums, teeth, and throat from the bad bacteria that cause inflamed tissue, decay and bad breath.  For one, probiotics kill ulcer-causing (and bad-breath causing) bacteria, like h.pylori, by making hydrogen peroxide, and also improves the digestion of proteins, carbohydrates and fats, which takes pressure off of the digestive system.  In turn, this can improve a person’s bowel function and relieve gas and bloating. Some gastrointestinal illnesses that probiotics may aid in are inflammatory bowel diseases, antibiotic-related diarrhea, Clostridium difficile toxin-induced colitis, infectious diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, irritable bowel syndrome and food allergies.  They can help decrease the problem with food allergies by reinforcing the barrier function of the intestinal lining.

Probiotics help the immune system function by increasing the amount of “good” bacteria in the body, helping fight off bad organisms that may try to gain a foothold in the system.  They also can prevent and fight yeast and fungal infections (i.e. candida, oral thrush, vaginal yeast infections and athlete’s foot).  They even can help reduce lactose intolerance because they can break down lactose and produce the enzyme lactase.  Probiotics can also be used after or during a session of taking antibiotics; they can immediately recolonize the beneficial gut flora that are destroyed by antibiotics.  The problem with antibiotics is that they kill both good and bad bacteria, thus sometimes leaving the immune system needing to be detoxified.  They can increase levels of circulating antibodies and enhance the responses of circulating immune cells.  Some have been found to secrete antimicrobial substances known as “bacteriocins” which inhibit the strength of harmful bacteria.

It is even recommended that while traveling to take probiotics in order to combat foreign micro-organism that could reside in the food and water.

The success rate of oral probitics depends on their ability to survive the acid of the stomach and the alkaline conditions in the duodenum, stick to the intestinal lining and colonize the colon.

Related terms: AB-yogurt, acidophilus, acidophilus milk, antibiophilus, bacillus, Bifidobacteria, enterococcus, escherichia, fermented soymilk, flora, fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), Helicobacter pylori, L. acidophilus milk, L. acidophilus yogurt, Lactobacillaceae (family), lactobacilli, lactobacillus, lacto bacillus, oligofructose, oral bacteriotherapy, prebiotic, Saccharomyces boulardii, yogurt.

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