Posts Tagged ‘toothpaste’

Something in Your Toothpaste Might be Giving You Canker Sores!

Monday, August 8th, 2011

Before we get too ahead of ourselves, do you know the difference between a cold sore and a canker sore? They are also known as mouth ulcers and cause that unbelievably annoying, pain that can affect your ability to eat, drink and just enjoy your daily life. Canker sores: occur only inside your mouth, they aren’t contagious or caused by a virus. Click here to see a chart display the differences and to learn even more about canker sores in-depth.

What causes a canker sore? Canker sores are typically caused by damage to the oral tissue in your mouth. This is often due to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) – an all too common foaming agent that is an ingredient in most of the toothpastes that are on the market. But NOT TheraBreath toothpaste!

You hopefully already know that here at TheraBreath, we are big believers in only using the best quality ingredients and eliminate any unnecessary or potentially harmful chemicals, flavors or detergents.

So check the ingredients on you (and your children’s) toothpaste. Do you see sodium lauryl sulfate in it? If so, you may want to consider giving it the boot and getting your very own tube of TheraBreath toothpaste. After all, we have enough to worry about in our busy lives; canker sores shouldn’t be an issue.

What is SLS? It’s SOAP. It’s a surfactant that can cause damage to the lining of the interior of your mouth and dry it out, causing dry mouth, which you probably know by now can lead to bad breath.

Why would oral care companies include this in your toothpaste? SLS creates that foaming action that develops in your mouth when you’re brushing your teeth. While it isn’t actually doing anything to better clean your teeth, gums and mouth, it gives the user the impression that it does. SLS is also used in many shampoos for the same foam-filled experience.

Want to learn even more about canker sores and sodium lauryl sulfate? Then be sure to click here for more fact-filled articles and information.

No Comments Yet »

Sale Alert for all Lucky and Savemart Grocery Customers!

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

Savings Alert!  Did you know that Lucky and Savemart Grocery Stores are having a Sale on TheraBreath Oral Rinse and Toothpaste….. Right NOW?

You can save $1.00 on EACH TheraBreath Mouthwash and Toothpaste from now until February 28th, and this discount will be taken as a scan-down at checkout!

Talk about savings!  And here’s a hint….. you can save even more by printing out and taking in the Manufacturer’s Coupons found at www.drkatz.com!

So hurry down to your local Lucky or Savemart (complete list can be found at www.therabreath.com/loc_retail.asp) and stock up on TheraBreath Oral Rinse and Toothpaste!

- The TheraBreath Team

 * please check with your individual Lucky and Savemart stores for offer limits on coupon redemption.

No Comments Yet »

What Makes TheraBreath Different?

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

 TheraBreath is America’s best selling fresh breath mouthwash and toothpaste regimen. Dr Katz, the formula’s inventor and America’s foremost expert on fresh breath, discusses what makes the formula unique.

No Comments Yet »

Sports Drinks May Erode Tooth Enamel

Monday, April 27th, 2009

Research has shown that the citric acid in sports drinks can damage teeth.

Researchers at the New York University College of Denstistry used cow teeth to come to this conclusion. They cut the teeth in half and put them in the top-selling sports drinks, and after they soaked up to 90 minutes (similar to a human sipping on drinks throughout the day), they found that the enamel of the teeth was partially eaten away. If the enamel coating is weakened, the sports drinks are more likely to leak into the bonelike material underneath the enamel, which causes teeth to soften and weaken. This condition is called erosive tooth wear, and it can lead to severe tooth damage or the loss of teeth if it is not treated.

Surprisingly enough, Dr. Mark Wolff, chairman of cariology and comprehensive care at the NYU College of Dentistry, said brushing immediately after drinking a sports beverage is likely to cause more damage than waiting a bit. This is because the softened tooth enamel is more vulnerable to the toothpaste’s abrasiveness.

Experts recommend that people should consume sports beverages in moderation, and wait at least 30 minutes before brushing their teeth, so the softened enamel has time to re-harden. It may also be a good idea for someone who consumes a lot of sports drinks to find an acid-neutralizing, re-mineralizing toothpaste to help re-harden soft tooth enamel.

No Comments Yet »

Tip of the week

Monday, October 1st, 2007

Dr. Katz gives you a friendly bad breath tip. Stay tuned for bad breath tips once a week.

 Do not brush your teeth in a hurry. Brushing your teeth two minutes every time will do wonders for your breath.


 

No Comments Yet »