Posts Tagged ‘tooth loss’

When Pulling Teeth, Beware of Dry Mouth, Dry Sockets and Bad Breath

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

In childhood, pulling baby teeth is a rite of passage. At first it can be a little scary, but most kids get used to it, and many look forward to their next empty socket – and visit from the tooth fairy. Of course, some tykes need help with their first loose tooth, and that means being prepared as a parent to deal with blood, germs, dry mouth and bad breath.

According to a recent post at Nanny.Net, it’s not too tough to help your child pull his or her first tooth. To start, you’ll need to wash your hands, get some gauze ready and keep your little one relaxed…

Then comes the actual pulling

This can require some wiggling or apple-eating. (Ditch the string. It’s no better than using your hands.) Finally, the source recommends putting pressure on the empty socket after the tooth comes out to stanch the blood flow, then applying ice in order to numb any little aches your child may feel.

However, things don’t end there. What many parents don’t realize is that a newly pulled tooth presents a unique opening for infections, dry mouth and bad breath. In large part, this is due to a side effect familiar to nearly anyone who’s had their wisdom teeth pulled: a dry socket.

A clot, lost

Dry sockets occur when a blood clot, the one that fills the hole in lieu of a tooth, accidentally falls out. This is most common among teens and young adults, whose wisdom teeth removals often leave large, tenuous scabs at the back of the jaws. A little too much negative pressure – say, from sucking on a straw – can pop one of these clots out.

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What Are Receding Gums and What Causes Them?

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Receding gums (commonly misspelled as receeding gums), also known as gingival recession, describes the loss of gum tissue, potentially exposing the roots of one’s teeth. It generally happens the most to people in their 40s and older, but can sometimes start in the teen years. It is one of the main indicators of periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis, gingivitis, or gum disease).

Some causes of receding gums include:

- Brushing too hard with a toothbrush that has hard bristles. This causes the enamel by the gum line to erode.
- Periodontal disease
- Lack of adequate flossing and/or brushing. This allows bacteria / tartar buildup, which results in enzymes eating away the bone of your teeth
- Chewing tobacco. This affects the mucus membrane lining in the oral cavity and causes receding gums over a certain amount of time
- Bruxism (teeth grinding)
- Adult orthodontic moving of the teeth
- Lip or tongue piercings can wear away the part of the gum that rubs against them
- Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), an ingredient that is in most toothpastes
- An uncommon cause is an adult tooth not growing out of the right place in the gum

It usually takes time for the gums to recede, and can often remain unnoticed. Some receding gums symptoms include the following:

- The teeth may be sensitive to hot, cold, sweet, sour, and spicy sensations. This is possibly because the dentin tubules might be exposed to external stimuli.
- Teeth may look longer than normal.
- Roots of the teeth may be seen.
- Tooth may feel notched at the gum line
- Teeth discoloration (due to the difference between the color of the enamel and cementum)
- Spaces appear between teeth due to the gums not being there anymore
- Cavities below gum line

NOTE: If receding gums are caused by gingivitis, you may also have these symptoms:
- Swollen/inflamed, red, or puffy gums
- Gum bleeding while brushing or flossing
- Bad breath

If you are having the aforementioned problems, you should try the PerioTherapy product line!

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Cancer Patients Need to Maintain Dental Health Prior to Therapy

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

cancer


After the recent deaths of many celebrities including Farrah Fawcett and Michael Jackson, people are realizing that maintaining their health is more important than ever. People who have just learned that they have cancer may not be thinking about taking care of their oral hygiene, but this can have significant consequences. Cancer patients who do not discuss their sitaution with a dentist before starting chemotherapy or radiation may put the health of their teeth in jeopardy or delay their treatment.

 Dr. Mitchell Josephs, a dentist at Palm Beach Towers, tells people about to start chemotherapy that they should get a dental cleaning and X-ray to make sure that there are no abscesses. If there is an emergency extraction to remove an infected tooth, this could disrupt cancer treatment. Obviously, if you have to have emergency dental work done after you started cancer treatment, your healing ability is going to be reduced.

 Therapies can also weaken teeth and cause tooth decay. Chemotherapy and radiation can reduce the mouth’s ability to produce saliva temporarily. Saliva is what protects and coats the teeth so they are not damaged by acidic foods. If a person uses a custom fluoride tray to coat the teeth in a concentrated fluoride solution daily(ten minutes a day) while going through chemotherapy, their teeth are much less likely to be discolored and weakened.

 Decay is usually caused by a very dry mouth. Inflammation of the gums can also be caused by cancer treatment. Dentures that do not fit correctly can make the situation worse by possibly causing ulcerations. This problem can be fixed by getting new dentures or dental implants for replacing the teeth permanently.

 Mouth rinses can help reduce mucositis, which is the ulceration and inflammation of the mouth’s tissue. According to Dr. Daniel Spitz, when a patient goes through chemotherapy, any underlying dental problems will increase the likelihood of there being cavities, bone loss, and tooth loss. If the blood count gets low, bacterial infections can grow out of control.

Source: Palm Beach Daily News

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Hydro Floss for Gingivitis and Gum Disease Treatment

Friday, June 19th, 2009

The Hydro Floss®: “A One-Time Investment for a Lifetime of Health & Confidence” – Reduces Tartar and Bacterial Buildup!

 Now you can get to the real source of gum disease, bleeding gums, and bad breath, by using the HydroFloss with Aktivoxigen Serum!

The HydroFloss combines Magneto- hydrodynamics with oral irrigation. By reversing the polarity of the ions at the molecular level, the HydroFloss inhibits the anerobic bacteria’s ability to attach to the tooth/root surface, before they reach a critical mass (which means the beginning of periodontal disease, gingivitis, and bad breath!).

What’s the difference between the HydroFloss and other water irrigation devices? The HydroFloss uses magnetic technology to “pull” plaque, tartar, and bacterial debris off enamel and out from below the gumline.

Here’s a simple explanation on how the HydroFloss provides the highest level of oral hygiene, particularly when used together with AktivOxigen or PerioTherapy Products. Since most of the bacteria are doing their dirty work below the gumline, the only way to attack the cause of the problem is to get into their environment. These anaerobic bacteria (related to the ones that cause bad breath) can easily get under the gumline and between the teeth which can cause periodontal disease and gingivitis. Once they are there, they start to reproduce rapidly and will immediately create plaque in the presence of sugars and other types of food (usually proteins in dairy foods, meat, chicken, fish, etc.).

The sulfur compounds that they produce have a chemical effect on the gum tissue which allows it to become porous and allows other toxins to get under the gums. Once these toxins get into this area, they start to cause gingivitis, periodontal disease, bone loss, loose teeth, and eventually the loss of teeth. This degrading process can be prevented by using the HydroFloss together with Dr Katz’s AktivOxigen or PerioTherapy products. The water/AktivOxigen solution that shoots through the HydroFloss tip becomes “magnetized.”

Plaque is very sticky, but scientifically it attaches tightly to the enamel and roots of your teeth through positive and negative charges. The magnetized water/PeriO2 solution hits the plaque & literally blasts it off the teeth by reversing the polarity at the enamel surface. Nothing else can do this. Once PerioTherapy is blasted under the gumline it will have an oxygenating effect on the bacteria & prevent them from producing the sulfur compounds which started the whole process in the first place.

As periodontal disease progresses, bleeding and sloughing of oral tissue continues, providing a food source for the anaerobic bacteria to produce more sulfur compounds. It then becomes physically impossible to clean below the gum line. That’s where the HydroFloss comes in. To be used properly, we recommend one capful of TheraBreath Oral Rinse to be added to the water trough of the HydroFloss. The oxidizing effect of the TheraBreath formula destroys the bacteria’s ability to break down the proteins and create the sulfur compounds.

Click here to check out the HydroFloss!

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