Posts Tagged ‘tooth decay’

Some Dental Students are Clueless about Bad Breath

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

It’s easy to rely on your dentist or dental hygienist to recognize when your breath stinks. After all, you’d think they’d be the experts; the people who can tell you about it honestly, explain where it comes from and make recommendations on eliminating it. But a new survey has found that many dental students know next to nothing about bad breath.

This is why it’s best to see a dentist and a breath specialist, who can focus on your oral odor and point you to some specialty breath fresheners that will actually treat the problem.

Where does bad breath come from?

You might think that a pop quiz over the origins and treatments of halitosis would be a piece of cake, right? But evidently, it’s not – for laypersons or dentistry students. That’s one of the conclusions reached by the administrators of a survey, whose results appeared in the Portuguese Journal of Stomatology, Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery.

To be fair, researchers asked about tough subjects like organoleptic scores and gram-negative microorganisms, but they also included easy questions, like:

- Which region of the body does bad breath usually come from? Only 22 percent of the dozens of respondents said the tongue, which is the correct answer. More than 40 percent said the stomach!

(more…)

1 Comment »

EPA Calls for Reduction in Fluoride in Drinking Water

Monday, March 7th, 2011

For decades, fluoride has been added to drinking water helping to prevent cavities and fight halitosis and tooth decay in the United States. Recently the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have officially stated that only the minimum requirements of fluoride should be added to drinking water, reducing the current amount.

Along with our water supply, fluoride is found in many oral care products. According to the EPA, fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay by slowing the loss of tooth enamel. Just a small amount between 0.7 and 1.2 milligrams is effective. The EPA and HHS are now suggesting the acceptable level of fluoride in drinking water should be at the minimum of 0.7 milligrams per liter.

The reason for this change is the increasing amount of fluoride that is available through dental cleanings, oral care products such as toothpaste, and tap water.

One of the results of tooth decay is bad breath. When halitosis is prevalent, fluoride in drinking water may do little to help with curing bad breath. While it is important to be hydrated to avoid dry mouth, maintaining a healthy oral care routine is very important. TheraBreath products are guaranteed to stop bad breath. After all, if just drinking water eliminated bad breath and cavities, dentists would be out of business!

Also consider trying an oral care probiotic that can help your body’s ability to resist cavities, sore throats, ear infections, tonsil stones, bad breath and more.

1 Comment »

Gum Disease (One of the Major Causes of Bad Breath) Myths

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

gum disease myths

Many people fail to treat gum disease, even though it can cause severe damage if left untreated.  This is probably because most people fail to understand how serious gum/periodontal disease can be.   Statistics say that around 75%-80% of people have a for of gum disease, ranging from mild to severe. 

Here are some common MYTHS that you need to discard:

1.  Bleeding gums are not a big deal.  FALSE!  Many gum symptoms (i.e. bleeding/receding/red/swollen gums/bad breath) are all key signs that you might have periodontal disease.  If you notice that certain foods, flossing, and/or brushing can cause your gums to bleed, it’s best that you go to the dentist and get a diagnosis.  Gum disease not only can lead to tooth decay and loss, but it may help instigate disease in the heart, diabetes, and so on.  It may also be a sign of other serious issues in your body!

2.  Flossing every day is not important.  FALSE!  A good oral hygiene regimen requires that you floss on a daily basis as one of the main ways, besides brushing, to prevent gum disease.  Allegedly, only 13.5% of Americans floss that often.  Not a good sign! 

3.  Periodontist visits are intimidating, and they’ll pull your teeth if you go in for treatment.  FALSE!  Experts on gum disease have received specialized training to help with your dental problems– everything from the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of gum disease.  Also, technology and treatments are always improving, so visits are becoming more and more comfortable.  If you avoid gum disease treatment, the gums will continue to recede and you’ll lose your tooth naturally. 

4.  Once a tooth is lost from gum disease, you can’t get it back.  FALSE!  Gum disease may be one of the main causes of tooth loss in people over age 18, but periodontists are extremely knowledgeable in placing dental implants.  These are artificial tooth roots that are inserted into the jaw to hold a replacement tooth.   Dental implants have a 98% success rate, and according to surveys, over 70% of people are extremely satisfied with the results of their dental implants. 

5.  Practicing poor oral care is the only way to get gum problems.  FALSE!  Neglecting your oral hygiene can definitely be a reason for gum disease progression, but other important factors need to be acknowledged.  Tobacco use, stress, a poor diet, and even genetics can alter how your body reacts to bacteria in the oral cavity. 

6.  Gum disease gets better on its own.   FALSE!  With the right care, it may clear up eventually, but it is an infection that needs immediate attention.  Just imagine if you had these open sores on your skin–just because it is in your mouth doesn’t mean you can ignore it.

7.  Bleeding gums are normal.  FALSE!  There is a reason as to why your gums are bleeding.  It does happen to almost everyone, but there has to be an actual injury to the gums causing them to bleed.

So, all in all, these statements are NOT true, and gum disease is something that you need to treat ASAP. 

Source:  The Mouth Doctor, Perio

5 Comments »

Protect Your Smile / Stop Halitosis

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

white smile

As you get older, you’ll realize how important proper oral hygiene is.  There are ways you can keep tabs on your oral health every month or so.  Check your mouth for white and red patches, tongue flakiness, pigmented lesions, and sores with uneven borders.  Oral cancer is rare with non-smokers, but it’s still possible to get it.  In order to check yourself for it, look at your outer and inner lips, and all sides of the tongue.  Look on the outside and inside if you cheers, and if there’s ever abnormalities that last longer than 14 days, ask a dental expert about it. 

Here are some things that you can pay attention to in order to protect your oral health:

Canker sores: these tend to pop up when people are stressed.  You can try a topical pain reliever directly on the spot.  Dentists can also use a soft-tissue laser to get rid of them.

Fix bad breath: If you’re not sure that you have bad breath at any given moment, use a cotton ball or gauze pad on the back of your tongue and smell it.  Whenever you brush your teeth, make sure to also get the back of your tongue, since this is where bacteria really like to proliferate.  Alcohol is found in most mouthwashes, but the problem with that is that alcohol helps dehydrate — thus drying the gums and reducing saliva flow.  After this, the bacteria multiples and causes the halitosis to worsen.  Keep in mind that TheraBreath sells an alcohol-free mouthwash!

Back of the mouth: Make sure to get this area when brushing, especially along the gum lines.  If you have a hard time accessing that area when brushing, slighty open the mouth.

Floss, floss, floss!  This is especially needed to prevent tartar buildup.  Toothbrushes can only get so far between the teeth–only 1 millimeter under the gums.  The problem is that gum pockers are usually 3-4 millimeters, which is deeper.  The bacteria feeds off the particles that get caught in these pockets, and if you don’t take care of the issue, you’ll have tooth decay and in extreme cases, jawbone loss.  Keep in mind that 80% of adults allegedly have a form of gum disease!

By practicing good oral hygiene, you’ll help keep your smile white and clean!

1 Comment »

Yogurt: Tooth Decay, Gum Disease and Bad Breath Cure

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

sugarless yogurt

According to Japanese research, sugarless yogurt can serve as another remedy for bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease.  Yogurt had allegedly reduced the levels of hydrogen suphide (a primary cause of halitosis) in 80% of participants in the study conducted by the International Association for Dental Research.  The plaque and gum disease levels were also noticeably lower among those who ate the yogurt. The main bacteria that help reduce bad breath are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

The study group of volunteers ate 90 grams of yogurt every day for six weeks, while maintaining a strict diet, medication intake, and oral hygiene routine. 

People should consider having sugar-free yogurt as a healthy snack, since sugary snacks rank high in causing tooth decay.  According to statistics, 1/4 people have chronic bad breath, and 19/20 have gum disease sometime in their lives!  By cutting down on the consumption of sugary snacks and chocolate and adopting a good oral hygiene routine, one can start adopting better oral health.

Source: BBC News

5 Comments »