Posts Tagged ‘Tongue Scraper’

The Latest TheraBreath Blog Reviews and Giveaways

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Please note: if you have already been lucky enough to win one of these bloggers giveaways, please refrain from entering in order to allow others to win. Thank you!

This just in: Mommyof2Babies has just posted her TheraBreath giveaway and review. Hurry here to enter for a chance to win some TheraBreath Oral Rinse and Toothpaste! Here’s a little of what she thought about our products, “I had the privilege to review the TheraBreath Oral Rinse  I have to say this has helped a lot with morning breath when I get up and brush I also use a tongue cleaner and after I was with regular mouth wash the bad breath seems to come back. But not with this the rinse helps keep that bad breath away.”

Are you a blogger located in the United States and interested in reviewing TheraBreath products?  Just go to http://www.therabreath.com/blogger and fill out the form to let us know. Please note, we do not pay for reviews but will send the products to try at no cost.

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For halitosis, antibacterial agent works just fine without detergent

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

What is necessary in a mouthrinse, toothpaste or specialty breath freshener for getting rid of halitosis? A recent study found that while a common antibacterial and antifungal substance reduced oral odor when combined with a detergent, the latter wasn’t necessary for sweetening breath.

Research published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology noted that triclosan, an agent that can eliminate fungal and bacterial populations, dramatically reduced the scent of bad breath when combined with alcohol or sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS).

However, both of these additives need not be included in an effective mouthwash, the team wrote. Experiments conducted by the authors “support the contention that triclosan exhibits an anti-[volatile sulfur compound] effect per se,” meaning that SLS is not a requirement in a breath freshener.

On the contrary, the team noted that they could not conduct a test on the halitosis-fighting properties of SLS alone because the substance “may cause damage to oral tissues” in solutions stronger than those found in common toothpastes.

What is SLS? A surfactant, or foaming agent, as well as a detergent in stronger doses. Rather than putting what amounts to soap in your mouth and risking getting canker sores, consider using a specialty tongue scraper or SLS-free mouth rinse.

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Mind Your Own Beeswax, Bees Can Cure Bad Breath?

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

Most of us know now that bad breath (halitosis) can be caused by: cavities; dentures; smoking; alcohol; lung, tonsils, adenoid, sinus or throat infections; certain foods (garlic, onions, high sugar products, spicy foods, dairy products); poor oral hygiene; and so on.  We’ve also discussed many different possible cures.  Here are some natural remedies you may not have suspected:

  • Bee Propolis (a resinous mixture that is collected by bees from tree buds and other sources) helps gum infections, as well as other infections.  Obviously, if one is allergic to bees, he or she should not try this method of diffusing bad breath.  Propolis has been used as an antimicrobial, emollient, immunomodulator, dental anti-plaque agent,anti-tumor growth agent, and even in food and musical instruments.
  • Drink water to moisten the mouth, which increases the strength of saliva in the mouth, that cleanses the bad breath bacteria
  • Use a tongue scraper to help remove bacteria
  • Use an odorless form of garlic, which is a natural antiobiotic
  • Zinc also has an antibacterial effect
  • Add half a lemon to a glass a water, and gargle with it
  • When brushing the gums and tongue, use powdered cloves, an herbal remedy for bad breath.  One can keep cloves under the molars without chewing to help maintain fresh breath.
  • Avoid foods like blue cheese, salami, curry, tuna, garlic, onions, anchovies, red meat, milk, coffee, cola, etc.
  • Parsley is a natural deodorizer
  • Cardamom is a breath sweetener
  • Cranberries help fight off the bad breath-causing bacteria
  • Eating a green/raw Guava will help stop bad breath
  • Fruits that are high in Vitamin C, like citrus and oranges, will help control the bad bacteria
  • Eucalyptus Oil is found in many toothpastes and other oral products because it has an active antiseptic ingredient, Eucalyptol
  • Sometimes chewing on sugarless gum or eating sugarless candies will help keep the mouth moist and not contribute to the growth of bad oral bacteria
  • Edible camphor helps against bad breath caused by tonsilitis, sinusitis, and head colds, since it is a very effective throat stimulant.  It helps get rid of clogged mucus, making it a natural and effective nasal decongestant.
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Fit: Every Breath You Take – Dr. Katz in Columbus, Ohio

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Dr. Katz, who is on a nationwide “bad breath mission tour” gets down to the basics of bad breath with Vicky Hallett of Read Express.

IF YOU’RE LOOKING for someone to kiss, try the streets of Columbus, Ohio. That’s what dentist-bacteriologist Harold Katz says, anyway. Armed with a device called a Halimeter, the author of “The Bad Breath Bible” is touring the nation to give out gold stars or break the news that, yes, that odor is completely offensive. The current standings have the Midwestern city as the country’s fresh-breath front-runner. To prepare our city for his impending arrival (although the date isn’t scheduled yet), Katz has some tips on making mouths more fragrant.

» EXPRESS: Are people aware of how stinky their breath is?
» KATZ: No, people don’t know they have bad breath. Their brains get used to their odors.

» EXPRESS: So, what causes bad breath?
» KATZ: A dry mouth is the number one cause. People don’t drink enough water to replenish their saliva, and many mouthwashes are full of alcohol, which just dries mouths out more. The teeth have very little to do with it — it comes from bacteria in the back of the throat. The odor you smell in bad breath comes from anaerobic sulphur-producing bacteria, so it stays away from oxygen.

» EXPRESS: But can’t you scrape your tongue?
» KATZ: That does help somewhat, but people who use traditional toothpaste to do it are making their tongues dry, and you don’t want to keep the tongue dry.

» EXPRESS: Garlic can impact breath, but are any foods surprising?
» KATZ: We recommend that if you go to a party that you look for things that are juicy, like fruits. Dairy foods are a big problem because they contain proteins that can break down and smell.

» EXPRESS: Do breath mints help?
» KATZ: Not much, especially if it contains sugar. The way you grow bacteria in a lab is to give it sugar.

» EXPRESS: I hear you’ve worked with celebrities. Any good stories?
» KATZ: I can’t name names, but I treated a singer who had a lounge act. The people at the front tables would go to the back of the room. Also, smokers and drinkers end up with bad breath, so actors have major issues with kissing scenes.

» EXPRESS: How do you politely tell someone they have foul breath?
» KATZ: We have a tell-a-friend program [on the Web site Therabreath.com]. They’ll get an e-mail explaining what bad breath is all about. We’re not here to insult them.

» EXPRESS: Can bad breath be a sign of something more than dry mouth?
» KATZ: Quite often we talk about this as a funny thing, but there’s a strong link to illness when you have those high levels of sulphur. It means you’re susceptible to gum disease. Once gums are puffy and bleeding, that’s a chronic infection. There’s a higher incidence of heart attacks and strokes. Signs that things are out of balance could lead to serious consequences.

» EXPRESS: Any other breath-freshening tips for our readers?
» KATZ: Drinking a six-pack of beer is not the same as drinking water. And we highly recommend flossing. It’s one of these things people avoid, but in those crevices is where the bacteria are hiding from oxygen. Also, certain medications — anti-histamines, anti-depressants — can make the mouth dry. So, people who never had bad breath might get it with a new prescription.

» EXPRESS: I know you haven’t tested D.C. breath yet, but any thoughts on how politicians will do?
» KATZ: People who talk a lot use up their saliva, and their breath starts to become offensive. So, if they want to get votes, they should drink plenty of water on the campaign trail.

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Do You Have a White Tongue or Geographic Tongue? Discover How To Correctly Clean Your Tongue to Make White Tongue Disappear!

Monday, September 10th, 2007
A White Tongue is something that nobody wants to have – not only does a white tongue look abnormal, but left untreated, it’s a strong indication of a breath problem. People who have a condition known as geographic tongue are definitely more likely to experience a white tongue. Geographic Tongue simply means a tongue that has lots of grooves and fissures in it – these grooves and fissures make an excellent breeding ground for the anaerobic bacteria that cause bad breath and a white tongue. The way around this problem is simply making sure that your tongue is kept as clean as possible. But not all tongue cleaning is created equal….Tongue Cleaning (or Tongue Scraping) is a process that the majority of people in the United States don’t do on a daily basis. Yet it’s one of the most important steps you can take to keep your breath clean and fresh.It’s not difficult to do, and it’s not even that particularly time consuming. Yet that extra minute or two per day can reap huge rewards in preventing bad breath, and helping to prevent white tongue and return it to its normal color.A healthy tongue should be slightly moist, smooth, and slightly pinkish in color (see image below left).Under certain conditions, a geographic tongue can become coated, off-color (white, yellow, even black), and dry and cracked (see images below right).

HEALTHY TONGUE: UNHEALTHY, DRY, COATED TONGUES:
 
  Healthy Tongue   White Tongue   Geographic Tongue   Coated Tongue

Let me clarify a few things about tongue cleaning:

 
  1. It’s not necessary to scrape hard
    I’ve seen patients make their tongues bleed because they were pressing down so hard. In general, pressing harder does not remove more bacteria. You simply need to press hard enough so that the tongue cleaner contacts your tongue, flush across the cleaning surface. Try not to leave any gaps.
  2. Tongue Cleaning Alone Does Not Prevent Bad Breath
    Tongue Cleaning does not kill the bacteria that cause bad breath that are breeding below the surface of a geographic tongue. It simply removes the gunk on the surface of your tongue (mucus and food debris) which are a food source for those anaerobic bacteria. In order to get rid of those anaerobic bacteria (which are responsible for white tongue), you must use an oxygenating toothpaste which can penetrate beneath your tongues surface.
  3. It’s not necessary to use one of those complex, expensive gizmos to successfully clean your tongue
    Really, all your need is a fairly rigid instrument, that you can easily make flush with the largest amount possible of your tongues surface area. The electronic tongue cleaners you see can be helpful if you have arthritis, difficulty with coordination, or in general have a tough time performing the actions listed below.
  Recommended Tongue Cleaners:Triple Headed Plastic Tongue Cleaner

 

Step-By-Step Instructions to Successfully Clean A Geographic Tongue and Prevent White Tongue

 
Here is an average tongue cleaning from start to finish from one of my patients who volunteered to allow me to take his picture.

  1. Starting at the very base of your tongue, place the tongue cleaner flush against your tongues surface and make slow sweeping strokes from back-to-front. Start at either side (left or right) and work your way to the other. Depending on the tongue cleaner you are using, you might need to make 3-4 different ‘swaths’ across your tongue.
  2. Once the surface debris from your tongue has been removed, apply a small bead of TheraBreath Oxygenating Toothpaste to the head of your tongue cleaner
  3. Gently coat the suraface of your tongue (as far back as possible without gagging) with the toothpaste. This allows it to penetrate below the surface of your tongue to neutralize those sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria! There are more bacteria in the rear of your tongue than in the front.
  4. Once your tongue is coated, allow the toothpaste to stay on the surface of your tongue as long as you can. Up to 90 seconds is ideal. If you begin to cough, or your gag reflex kicks in, that’s ok, just spit whenever you need to.
  5. Ideally, it’s best to leave the toothpaste on the surface of your tongue, while you brush your teeth normally.
  White TongueApply TheraBreath ToothpasteGently Scrape TongueHealthy Tongue
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