Posts Tagged ‘tea tree oil’

What’s in the Best Mouthwash for Treating Bad Breath?

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Do you have oral odor, bad breath or evil-smelling exhalations? Is every puff from your palate putrid, every gasp gross? Is your respiration rank? In short, do you have halitosis? If so, you’re probably on the hunt for the best mouthwash around. Well, look no further. TheraBreath is here to help.

We find that many people come to us feeling frustrated about the mouthwash that they’re using. After all, most alcohol-based mouthrinses promise to nix bacteria, sweeten breath, thicken enamel and so on. Why is it that these products just don’t seem to work?

The problem is in the ingredients. Simply put, common mouthwashes are missing the compounds they should have and contain what they don’t need. TheraBreath, on the other hand, creates the best mouthwash around.

The worst mouthrinses contain alcohol. This may sound silly, since alcohol kills microbes, right? Well, even though ethanol eliminates many bacteria – the usual figure is 99.99 percent, though that’s not necessarily accurate – it can’t kill them all. Those that remain quickly repopulate your mouth with a new breed of slightly more resilient microorganisms.

That’s no good. On top of that, alcohol dries out your palate, leaving your mouth in prime condition for recolonization. Dryness can irritate your gums and tongue, too, as can sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), another common ingredient in typical mouthwashes. This chemical is a surfactant and detergent. That’s right: SLS is similar to the stuff you wash your dirty clothes in.

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The Best Mouthwash is One that Neutralizes Odor Naturally

Monday, November 7th, 2011

Use a common, alcohol-based mouthrinse, and you may find that your bad breath does not go away over time – or worse, that it slowly intensifies. At TheraBreath, we understand this problem. We believe that the best mouthwash is one that neutralizes halitosis naturally while moistening your mouth and keeping its pH balanced.

If you believe that irritation caused by alcoholic mouthwashes is an uncommon occurrence, think again. Numerous studies have  addressed the connection between canker sores and the synthetic chemicals found in typical oral rinses. Likewise, plenty of consumers complain about the ineffectiveness of these products.

For instance, in a recent letter to the UK Telegraph’s LifeCoach column, a reader noted that they suffer from chronic halitosis, even though they clean their teeth regularly. Nutritionist Sara Stanner responded that the best mouthwash, toothpaste and dental care regimens in general are those that promote oral moisture.

She emphasized that merely stimulating natural salivation can reduce the level of bad breath. At TheraBreath, we go one step further by providing products with natural ingredients that both encourage and preserve the production of moisture in the mouth.

Consider the new TheraBreath PLUS Oral Rinse, an oxygenating formula mouthwash containing zinc, tea tree oil, green tea, aloe vera, xylitol and mint oils. These substances do wonders for bad breath by attacking oral microbes and neutralizing their odor compounds.

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Bad Breath

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

bad breath

Bad breath, especially morning breath, can be a problem for everyone. Sometimes mouthwash is not enough, and the problem is chronic. Dry mouth can be a main cause of bad breath, since saliva is the the body’s natural defense against oral bacteria. Many things can cause dry mouth, including alcohol, medicines, stress, medical conditions, nasal infections, foods high in protein, smoking and poor oral hygiene. Since bad breath can be so embarrassing, it is no surprise that it can cause social problems and mental problems. Some people may be afraid to talk to others or refuse to go out. Seclusion can cause depression and if the sufferers take up comfort eating, weight gain can also occur.

Which remedies for bad breath actually work? Baking soda has been involved in many home remedies, and in some situations, it does not work. However, with bad breath it tends to work. If you brush your teeth and tongue with a tiny bit of baking soda, it can make the mouth have a less hospitable environment for the bad breath-causing bacteria to grow.

Also, homemade tea tree mouthwashes have become more popular in the fight against bad breath. Tea tree is supposed to be a powerful disinfectant, so if you add just a few drops of tea tree oil to your mouthwash, you’re already on your way to fresher breath. Also, there are other ingredients that you can add to your mouthwash in order to make your breath fresher, such as peppermint. Rinse your mouth out at least two times a day and you will very likely have an improvement in the way your breath smells!

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Tea Tree Oil for Bad Breath and Gum Disease

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

tea tree oilTea tree oil (also known as melaleuca oil) has been used for medicinal purposes for many years. It can be used for antiseptic, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and cosmetic benefits. Tea tree oil has certain chemicals called terpenoids that have antiseptic and antifungal properties. It is an essential oil that is acquired by steam distillation of the leaves from an Australian plant called the Melaleuca alternifolia.   Originally, the leaves were used as a tea substitute, which is how tea tree oil got its name.       

 Tea Tree Oil Uses

Tea tree leaves were originally used for healing skin ailments, scrapes, insect bites, skin spots, cuts, infections, and burns by crushing the leaves and applying them to the area in need. Tea tree oil has been used for conditions such as acne, athlete’s foot, dandruff, nail fungus, vaginitis, thrush, periodontal disease, boils, lice, eczema, psoriasis, yeast infections, and as a general antiseptic. It is also used often in creams, ointments, soaps, lotions, and shampoos.

Tea Tree Oil for Bad Breath

Tea tree oil can actually be used to help stop bad breath. Many toothpastes and oral products use tea tree oil in their formulas. Sometimes it is even used in mouthwash and other solutions for stopping bad breath. 

Why is tea tree oil used in halting halitosis? Well, it has antifungal and antiseptic qualities meaning that it can kill fungi and bacteria that feed on food particles left in the mouth. The antiseptic property is mainly what makes it effective for preventing bad breath. 

Studies have shown that tea tree oil being used for bad breath is safe, since it is a 100% natural product. It is environmentally friendly since it is obtained from a renewable natural resource, and the tea trees are not disturbed and are allowed to survive. 

However, there are unfavorable effects of tea tree oil for halitosis, and researchers recommend that you should go to the dentist and have a professional decide if tea tree oil would be appropriate for you to use to combat bad breath. Tea tree oil may not totally get rid of plague, and it can also cause allergies, even if the chance of this occurring is low. It may possibly alter hormone levels or cause allergic reactions.   Reactions are common with pure tea tree oil, so it is usually diluted when used;  however, it can also cause irritation when diluted.    It also should not be used if one is pregnant or breastfeeding.

Tea Tree Oil for Gum Disease (Periodontal Disease / Gingivitis)

Not only can tea tree oil help with halitosis, but it can even have antibiotic qualities and help heal gum infections. It can treat severe chronic gingivitis (gum disease / periodontal disease) and bleeding gums as they deeply penetrate to the skin. This is one of the main reasons a dentist would tell a patient to use toothpaste that contains tea tree oil for treating bad breath.

In order to get rid of gingivitis, you can use the tea tree oil by using one drop on top of your normal toothpaste on your toothbrush whenever you brush your teeth. It has a numbing effect and strong taste that will dissipate within five minutes. Never swallow the oil, do not use more than one drop, and wait around 15 minutes before drinking or eating. After a few weeks of using the tea tree oil, the gums should return to normal. One should also avoid sugary foods and drinks. If there are no results after a month, you could be suffering from a deeper infection in your body and should see a doctor/dentist for further help. 

Tea Tree Oil can be used against the follow bacteria/fungi:

Gram Positive bacteria: Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA), Staphyloccus epidermidis, Staphyloccus pneumoniae, Staphyloccus faecalis, Staphyloccus pyrogenes, Staphyloccus agalactiae, Propioni-bacterium acnes, Betahaemolytic streptococcus.

Gram Negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniac, Citrobactor ssp, Shigella sonnei, Proteus mirabilis (urinary tract infections), Legionella ssp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Fungi: Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Candida albicans, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Thermoactinomycetes vulgaris.

Source: Alt Medicine

 

As with anything, caution should be taken when using tea tree oil.

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