Posts Tagged ‘tartar’

Bad Breath Treatments: A Quick Review

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

There is a wealth of bad breath treatments available on the market, some effective and others less-than-productive. With so many routes to choose on the road to good oral
well-being, it is easy to get lost. Fortunately, we at TheraBreath are always willing to lay out a straightforward set of instructions for becoming dentally health and halitosis-free.

In the name of simplicity, here is a quick review of effective bad breath treatments.

- Brush your teeth. Sure, it may come as a given that you should try to keep your pearly whites clean, but many people take their dental health for granted. The same bacteria that contribute to tooth decay and cavities also emit many of the odor molecules associated with bad breath. By  brushing, you can kill two birds with one stone.

- Floss. The tartar that gets stuck between your teeth gives off a foul smell, especially if left to fester for months or even years. Using a fine strand of waxed string or dental tape can lift this gunk out from its hiding places. Don’t forget to floss all the way down under your gums!

- Scrape your tongue. It may sound disgusting, but the revulsion you feel reflects poorly on the state of your tongue, not on the scraper itself. Besides being an integral part of your digestive system, your tongue is home to billions of halitosis-causing microbes. It also carries several grams of dead cells and decaying proteins at any one time. Unless you’re comfortable treating your tongue like an ongoing bacteriological experiment, consider investing in a specialty tongue scraper.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

What Is Gingivitis and What Causes It?

Thursday, April 9th, 2009
What causes gingivitis?

What causes gingivitis, and how can it be treated?

Gingivitis is a non-serious form of gum disease meaning it is mild, but it can lead to a much more serious periodontal disease.  It can cause gum swelling, but in many causes there might not even be any symptoms, which is dangerous in itself.  Inflammation and infection caused by gingivitis can destroy mouth tissues that support the teeth.  If slight gingivitis problems are not treated properly, they an turn into more damaging types of periodontal diseases.

The main cause of gingivitis is not practicing proper oral hygiene.  If you do not brush and floss regularly, plaque can build up.  Plaque is made up of food deposits, bacteria, mucus and other things that can build up on the visible parts of your teeth.  Tartar is the result of plaque buildup, and gingivitis can be caused when the gums are irritated and inflamed enough from the tartar and plaque.

More causes of gingivitis include possibly brushing your teeth too roughly, or using a toothbrush that is not soft enough.  Various lifestyle factors can increase your risk for gingivitis, including general illness, poor dental hygiene (as aforementioned), and hormonal changes caused by uncontrolled diabetes, pregnancy, or menopause.

Some gingivitis symptoms are:  red or swollen gums, gums bleeding during toothbrushing, chronic bad tastes in mouth, and halitosis (bad breath).  When gingivitis proceeds to worsen, symptoms may include receding gums, nerve root exposure and sensitivity, and teeth may become loose or fall out.

The symptoms of advanced-stage gingivitis can lead to or indicate periodontitis.

In order to stop gingivitis from progressing, it is very important to get the proper dental care. The available treatments for gingivitis require effort from the affected person.  A dentist will likely prescribe a treatment plan like the following:  1) prescription of an antibacterial mouthwash, 2) strict oral hygiene regimen, 3) proper brushing of teeth, 4) daily flossing, and 5) regulary dental cleanings by a professional.

In extreme cases, gingivitis could even require oral surgery in order to get rid of it.  However, it is not too hard to avoid the problem if you take proper care of your teeth and gums and know what warning signs to watch for.

No Comments Yet »