Posts Tagged ‘sodium lauryl sulfate’

Spring Is Here: New Products, New Stores, New Studies!

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

First of all, we’re proud to announce the following:

An article in the UK’s Daily Mail last week about bad breath entitled “How Mouthwash Can Give You Bad Breath and Stain Your Teeth” mentioned many of the studies I’ve been telling you about over the years including the study from the Australian Dental Society linking alcohol in mouthwash to oral cancer.

What was surprising in this article is that they finally corroborated what I’ve been saying about the dangers of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (the detergent everyone uses in toothpaste — except TheraBreath). Specifically, it says:

“Alcohol based mouthwash has also been linked to an increase risk in oral cancer. Scientists in a study published in The Dental Journal of Australia in 2009 reported that the alcohol in mouthwash allowed cancer causing substances to permeate the lining of the mouth more easily. Some ingredients in toothpaste such as the foaming agent sodium lauryl sulfate can interact with the fluoride in mouthwash and deactivate it so that it loses its effect.”

So as you can see, it literally washes away tons of good stuff, including the fluoride if you’ve previously rinsed with a fluoride mouthwash!

I knew from day 1, that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate was bad news, but the good news is that TheraBreath Toothpaste is and always has been Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and alcohol free! So make sure to visit one of the NEW stores listed above (or click here to find more stores near you), and if you don’t find TheraBreath products on the shelf at any of the stores above, please do me a favor and go talk to the store manager and ask them why not!

To celebrate the new retailers, new products at our current retailers, and the fact that TheraBreath toothpaste does everything we promise it will do, here are some coupons that you can use at any of these stores.

Yours in good oral health,

Harold Katz, DDS

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What Are Receding Gums and What Causes Them?

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Receding gums (commonly misspelled as receeding gums), also known as gingival recession, describes the loss of gum tissue, potentially exposing the roots of one’s teeth. It generally happens the most to people in their 40s and older, but can sometimes start in the teen years. It is one of the main indicators of periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis, gingivitis, or gum disease).

Some causes of receding gums include:

– Brushing too hard with a toothbrush that has hard bristles. This causes the enamel by the gum line to erode.
– Periodontal disease
– Lack of adequate flossing and/or brushing. This allows bacteria / tartar buildup, which results in enzymes eating away the bone of your teeth
– Chewing tobacco. This affects the mucus membrane lining in the oral cavity and causes receding gums over a certain amount of time
– Bruxism (teeth grinding)
– Adult orthodontic moving of the teeth
– Lip or tongue piercings can wear away the part of the gum that rubs against them
– Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), an ingredient that is in most toothpastes
– An uncommon cause is an adult tooth not growing out of the right place in the gum

It usually takes time for the gums to recede, and can often remain unnoticed. Some receding gums symptoms include the following:

– The teeth may be sensitive to hot, cold, sweet, sour, and spicy sensations. This is possibly because the dentin tubules might be exposed to external stimuli.
– Teeth may look longer than normal.
– Roots of the teeth may be seen.
– Tooth may feel notched at the gum line
– Teeth discoloration (due to the difference between the color of the enamel and cementum)
– Spaces appear between teeth due to the gums not being there anymore
– Cavities below gum line

NOTE: If receding gums are caused by gingivitis, you may also have these symptoms:
- Swollen/inflamed, red, or puffy gums
– Gum bleeding while brushing or flossing
– Bad breath

If you are having the aforementioned problems, you should try the PerioTherapy product line!

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