Posts Tagged ‘Probiotics’

A New Probiotic Gum That Fights Bad Breath and Infection!

Thursday, March 11th, 2010

probiotics gum

In Canada, a new probiotics gum has been released that allegedly banishes everything from ear aches, strep throat, to halitosis.  The University of British Columbia’s research contributed to the creation of this gum filled with ‘good’ bacteria.

These friendly bacteria, which includes approximately 500 million active Streptococcus salivarius bacteria, help to fight infection and bad breath.  It can help prevent tooth decay since it stops the ‘bad’ bacteria from sticking to the teeth.  According to sources, the gum seems like an effective way to introduce beneficial organisms to the oral cavity. 

In the near future, we’ll likely see toothpastes and oral rinses that carry probiotics.  Also, be sure to check out Aktiv-K12’s oral probiotics.

Source: Canwest News Service

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Probiotics, Teeth Whitening, and Bad Breath

Friday, February 19th, 2010

probiotics

Probiotics have taken an even greater plunge into the mainstream. The mint form of these probiotics are now stocked in over 7,000 stores throughout the US. Allegedly, this probiotic mint is supposed to help encourage good health for the teeth and gums. It is said that this oral probiotic supposedly has teeth whitening qualities, as well as the ability to banish bad breath. Streptococcus mutans is the main bacteria that causes tooth decay, and this bacteria transforms sugars in the mouth (from snacks, meals, etc.) into acids, which in turn attack the enamel of the teeth and possibly cause lesions or caries. This probiotic targets this bacteria and helps prevent the damage it can cause.

Obviously, more research has to be done on these new probiotics before further developments and assumptions can be made.  We are finally seeing the probiotic market expanding throughout the US, after being stuck in a smaller niche for so long. Other companies are doing research in hopes to formulate a type of probiotic that fights against dental caries. Some of these new formulas will likely have the probiotic Lactobillus paracasei, which binds to the bacteria that causes caries and groups them together.

Also, Aktiv-K12 is an excellent probiotic that helps prevent and treat bad breath, so check it out!

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Probiotics Serving New Functions in Different Markets

Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

probiotics

Many people are beginning to understand with probiotics that not all bacteria are bad.  In fact, probiotics have been contributing to good health for years. With an increasing demand of probiotics, people are requesting that they be available in forms other than yogurt and oral dietary supplements.  Consumers want more choices, since some people are sensitive to certain kinds of processing (i.e. temperature).  However, with constantly-improving technology, probiotics are being used in a broader market of goods.

The thought of beneficial bacteria has become more popular with the public, since studies have shown that probiotics can aid the immune system in the fight against the “bad guys”.  More and more yogurt brands are boasting probiotics on their labels, and companies are continuing to find ways to implement good bacteria strains into other foods that are not cultured by tradition.  This doesn’t necessarily mean a consumer will purchase this product, since a company tried adding probiotics to cheese, and this product didn’t sell too well.  This is because a consumer is not generally looking for cheese to add health benefits to a meal; instead, he or she usually uses cheese to add taste to what is being eaten.

People tend to be the most comfortable with probiotics being added to oral health care products, since strains of bad bacteria reside in the mouth, gums and teeth, and these bacteria can cause tooth enamel and gum disease.  Two of the most popular products that have received a high increase in growth are gums and mints, since functional gum has jumped 10% between 2007-2008.  A current trend in consumer education is people learning about the role that good strains of bacteria have in staying healthy and recovering one’s health. 

Streptococcus mutans is one of the Lactobacillus strains that work against enamel-eroding bacteria, and people can expect this strain to appear in gums and mints.  A sugar-free gum that came out recently contains the strain Lactobacillus reuteri, and there are mints that contain a mixture of strains L. reuteri, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosis and L. acidophilus, which target bad breath-causing bacteria.  Another company has developed a breath mint that features Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus uberis, and Streptococcus rattus, all targeted at preventing and fighting dental decay and halitosis.  Surprisingly, there is even a strain of bacteria called Streptococcus oralis that actually has a whitening effect on the teeth, since it crowds out bad bacteria on the teeth’s surface. 

Pharmaceutical companies are creating different probiotic breath mints that will be designed for improving oral health, and lasting much longer than current probiotics without being stored in cold temperatures.  An important thing for manufacturers to remember is that the new oral care products being made need to use bacteria that exist naturally in the oral cavity, otherwise they will not last long in the mouth. 

 There are over 400 different species of bacteria in the digestive, and all of these strains are competing for space to inhabit.  In general, the good bacteria can crowd out the bad bacteria, which is why consuming probiotics can be helpful for those who have diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose indigestion, irritable bowel syndrome, H. pylori (ulcer-causing bacteria) problems, and colon cancer.  It is also worth pointing out that these bacteria exist all over the body, including the mouth, skin, reproductive organs and other membranes.  Ingesting probiotics can even be beneficial for those with allergies, autism, arthritis, and liver and kidney problems.  

One of the major areas for probiotic’s growth in the market may be in immune defense, since probiotics can benefit the immune system’s response.  Immunity is related to gut health, and research has shown that probiotics improve cold and flu symptoms, allergic rhinitis and pollen allergies.  Asia and Europe have already been linking probiotics with immune health for many years, but the U.S. only recently caught on.  Probiotics also are known to prevent certain infections, so it may be useful with epidemics like the swine flu.  Various strains of bacteria have relieved fever symptoms, viral respiratory infections, and pneumonia

Probiotics, especially Lactobacilli, are effective in aiding the immune response and increasing the resistance to pathogens.  Newer territories that researchers are exploring are the effects of probiotics on inflammatory disease, cholesterol reduction and even anti-aging properties, post-myocardial infarction depression and stress management.  Even more surprising, there is groundbreaking research that probiotics can be beneficial in infant formulas, vaginal microbiota, and satiety (for weight management).

 A major challenge in administering probiotics is getting the right dosage, and making sure the correct strains go to the correct places in the body.  It is far from simple, and one of the major challenges that face manufacturers is heat, since it destroys the beneficial flora.  The ingredients in the probiotic supplements must be able to tolerate the handling, storage, processing, shelf-life issues, and the tempestuous environment of the acid in the stomach.  The limited amount of conditions that probiotics can handle seldom allow for applications outside of refrigerated supplements; however, more and more companies are improving the probiotics’ survival, so they are more protected- with longer shelf lives and slower releases.  With new technology constantly being released, some companies have even created a probiotic chocolate, and up and coming probiotic applications in cereal bars, cereals, ice creams, fresh fruit and vegetable juices, meal replacements, and biscuits.  Probiotics in hot tea and soup have even been made possible with these new advances in technology.  Last but not least, topical and personal care applications are now possible with probiotics, since antifungal and antiviral properties can be brought out during a process of fermentation.

 Currently, one of the main trends is pairing probiotics with other probiotics, since this enhances the probiotics’ ability to survive.  With the ever-changing and improving research, technologies and education of probiotics, innovators will continue to deliver new and improved products geared at improving everyone’s health. 

Source: Natural Products Insider

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Probiotics Supplements

Thursday, July 30th, 2009

The probiotics S. salivarius and B. coagulans are two strains of beneficial bacteria that help maintain healthy gums and teeth. These work very similarily to the probiotics that target your digestive flora. What these probiotics do is populate in the oral cavity and help protect the mouth against harmful bacteria that exist in dental film buildup.

Usually the probiotics can achieve their goal if you take supplements/lozenges 1-2 times per day after brushing. If you do it right after brushing your teeth, this speeds up the production of the compounds that help inhibit bad bacteria in your mouth.

Also, research shows that S. salivarius and B. coagulans can help the immune system flora.  Taking supplements of S. salivarius orally helps reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines in the body.  Studies show that B. coagulans increases the white blood cells’ ability to find bacteria invaders, boosts the immunity system’s response to a bacterial attack, and improves the performance of the natural killer cells, another type of immune cell.

Clinical studies showed that 85% of subjects with halitosis (bad breath) who received the strain S. salivarius greatly improved their bacterial flora balance as compared to 30% in the placebo group.  Those with chronic bad breath definitely need to replenish the good probiotic bacteria in their system!

Source: Business Wire

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Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) and Bad Breath

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

helicobacter pylori

A Japanese study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology has shown a strong link between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer) and gum disease. However, you may see articles on the internet and on the news incorrectly stating that this bacteria causes bad breath. Dr. Nao Suzuki, leader of the study group, specifically stated that H. pylori does not produce volatile sulfur compounds. Therefore, it does NOT directly produce bad breath.

On the other hand, it is closely associated with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria that cause gum disease. Many of you who are familiar with my own research years ago on the link between gum disease and bad breath, already understand that gum disease can create bad breath by providing fuel to the sulfur-producing bacteria already in the mouth, under the gums, and in the throat and tonsils.

These “fuels” include broken down oral tissue (which contain proteins necessary for odor producing bacteria to create odors) and blood (more proteins for the bad breath bugs). As the gum tissue recedes in the disease process or becomes swollen, it creates a home perfectly designed as a breeding ground for more anaerobic bacteria, since oxygen cannot get into deep pockets.

H. pylori thrives in an acidic environment – after all, it’s real home (in the digestive system) is bathed with gastric juices 24/7. We believe that the increasing incidence of H. pylori in the oral cavity may be due to the highly acidic oral products that have hit the market recently. Most mouthwash, for example, have a pH in the 4-5 range (7.0 is neutral and the lower the number the more acidic). The acidic mouthwashes include those that contain alcohol, those that require mixing, and many of the non-alcohol versions that use strong flavors and/or colors as marketing gimmicks.


H. pylori can be detected by a breath test, blood test, and other tests given to you by a specialist. It is best to get checked out by a professional right away if you suspect that you have this bacteria spiraling out of control in your system.

The good news is that all of our formulas (TheraBreath, PerioTherapy, etc) are above 7.0 and therefore work as ANTACIDS in the oral cavity.

Also, some doctors would prescribe various antibiotics for H. pylori. Make sure that if you take these, you are also taking a good probiotic to offset the damage that antibiotics can do to your immune system–meaning that when antibiotics are killing bad bacteria in your system, they are also killing the good bacteria in your system (which is what makes up your immune system).

So now that we know more about the problem – how do we avoid it — or get rid of it, if you already suffer from gum disease or bad breath? Well, prevention and treatment can be provided by the patented PerioTherapy System. PerioTherapy combines oxygenating compounds with natural and proven antimicrobials such as ZincRx, Tea Tree Oil, CoQ10, Aloe Vera, and Xylitol. The System Kit even includes trays so that the PerioTherapy Gel can be applied directly to problem gums. (PerioTherapy Gel does double duty by also working as your daily toothpaste).

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