Posts Tagged ‘Periotherapy’

Today’s Canker Sore Treatments Beat the old ones

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

If you get a canker sore, you’ve got a wealth of modern treatment options at your fingertips. You can gargle a specialty alcohol-free mouthwash to neutralize the odor or, for a deeper clean, rinse with a periotherapy product. In a pinch, you can even gargle salt water! But it wasn’t always this easy. In the 1800s, canker sore treatments were a little more, shall we say, unpleasant.

One of the weirder and more instructive reads you’ll find on the matter is Samuel North’s The Family Physician and Guide to Health (Waterloo, NY: 1830).

Pages 109-110 are all about canker sores, and the discomfort and bad breath they cause. If you were to follow Mr. North’s advice on canker sores, these are some of the many odd remedies you might try:

- Wash them with soapsuds.

- Rinse with strong tea.

- Apply a pinch of cayenne pepper (yowch!), followed by a poultice of white bread and ginger soaked with tea.

- Hold on a piece of eggshell until it sticks, then let it naturally fall off after several weeks.

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Check Out a New Infographic on Periodontal Disease and Cures for Gingivitis

Thursday, April 5th, 2012


Gum disease is much more common than you might think, and it can lead to major health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental

Infographic: Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental.com

It’s not so tough to think about bad breath, ruminate on gum disease or visualize the specialty cures for gingivitis. But can you do it all at once? It might help to have a nice infographic to look at, which is exactly what the folks at 1Dental have made.

The handy chart covers a lot of the bases that we regularly discuss here at TheraBreath. However, if you think it’s only about halitosis and the occasional oral-odor-related faux pas, you’re in for a surprise.

The fact is, gum disease, periodontitis and other serious oral health problems can do much more than foul up your breath. They can also increase your risk for some dire chronic illnesses, making cures for gingivitis more critical than ever.

For starters, the infographic notes that as many as one-half of all Americans have some level of gum disease, while a smaller fraction – between 5 and 10 percent – have serious gingivitis, or even periodontal disease.

As is immediately obvious when you take a peek at the page, these gum diseases come with some nasty baggage:

- People with periodontitis are four times more likely to develop pneumonia, compared to those without the gum condition.

- Fully 95 percent of people with diabetes have periodontal disease!

- Gum disease can contribute to lung infections and chronic pulmonary conditions.

- Mothers-to-be with periodontal disease have a sevenfold greater chance of giving birth prematurely or having an underweight baby.

Check out the infographic for more in that vein, as well as for ways to improve your dental health and avoid gum disease. The risks associated with periodontal disease are some of the very reasons that we’ve been recommending PerioTherapy for years. By fighting bad breath and attending to your gum health today, you may be able to avoid serious risks tomorrow.

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Gum Disease (One of the Major Causes of Bad Breath) Myths

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

gum disease myths

Many people fail to treat gum disease, even though it can cause severe damage if left untreated.  This is probably because most people fail to understand how serious gum/periodontal disease can be.   Statistics say that around 75%-80% of people have a for of gum disease, ranging from mild to severe. 

Here are some common MYTHS that you need to discard:

1.  Bleeding gums are not a big deal.  FALSE!  Many gum symptoms (i.e. bleeding/receding/red/swollen gums/bad breath) are all key signs that you might have periodontal disease.  If you notice that certain foods, flossing, and/or brushing can cause your gums to bleed, it’s best that you go to the dentist and get a diagnosis.  Gum disease not only can lead to tooth decay and loss, but it may help instigate disease in the heart, diabetes, and so on.  It may also be a sign of other serious issues in your body!

2.  Flossing every day is not important.  FALSE!  A good oral hygiene regimen requires that you floss on a daily basis as one of the main ways, besides brushing, to prevent gum disease.  Allegedly, only 13.5% of Americans floss that often.  Not a good sign! 

3.  Periodontist visits are intimidating, and they’ll pull your teeth if you go in for treatment.  FALSE!  Experts on gum disease have received specialized training to help with your dental problems– everything from the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of gum disease.  Also, technology and treatments are always improving, so visits are becoming more and more comfortable.  If you avoid gum disease treatment, the gums will continue to recede and you’ll lose your tooth naturally. 

4.  Once a tooth is lost from gum disease, you can’t get it back.  FALSE!  Gum disease may be one of the main causes of tooth loss in people over age 18, but periodontists are extremely knowledgeable in placing dental implants.  These are artificial tooth roots that are inserted into the jaw to hold a replacement tooth.   Dental implants have a 98% success rate, and according to surveys, over 70% of people are extremely satisfied with the results of their dental implants. 

5.  Practicing poor oral care is the only way to get gum problems.  FALSE!  Neglecting your oral hygiene can definitely be a reason for gum disease progression, but other important factors need to be acknowledged.  Tobacco use, stress, a poor diet, and even genetics can alter how your body reacts to bacteria in the oral cavity. 

6.  Gum disease gets better on its own.   FALSE!  With the right care, it may clear up eventually, but it is an infection that needs immediate attention.  Just imagine if you had these open sores on your skin–just because it is in your mouth doesn’t mean you can ignore it.

7.  Bleeding gums are normal.  FALSE!  There is a reason as to why your gums are bleeding.  It does happen to almost everyone, but there has to be an actual injury to the gums causing them to bleed.

So, all in all, these statements are NOT true, and gum disease is something that you need to treat ASAP. 

Source:  The Mouth Doctor, Perio

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Gum Disease

Friday, September 11th, 2009

Article: Gum Disease

 Dr Katz, America’s Bad Breath Expert, discusses what bleeding gums mean and how to get rid of gum disease.

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Diabetes and Gum Disease

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009

http://www.therabreath.com/productdetail.asp?cat=2&pid=287 A person with diabetes is at a much greater risk for gum / periodontal disease than a person who does not have diabetes.

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