Posts Tagged ‘Oral Health’

Your Oral Health Affects Work Productivity

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

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Want to be better at your job? Fixing toothaches, gum inflammation and other problems could be the solution.

That’s because a healthy mouth is an important indicator of personal well-being, self-confidence and reduced distractions that allow employees to shovel out optimal work in the office. 

If you don’t think a mighty mouth matters, consider this: Americans lose more than 164 million work hours due to dental health problems, according to a recent Delta Dental Oral Health and Wellbeing Survey. What’s more, the survey indicated that about one in six people in the U.S. (16 percent) miss work because of oral health issues.

The survey also highlighted more than one-quarter of Americans say they have oral health issues that they’d like to address, but are often prevented by their inability to pay for the treatment.

According to a U.S. Surgeon General report, neglecting oral health can lead to needless pain and complications. The social and financial costs of poor oral health can substantially lower your quality of life. 

Often, rotting teeth bring along bad breath, which may not only affect your focus, but that of nearby co-workers. Tooth decay occurs when damaging bacteria combine with leftover food particles to form plaque, which wears away at the protective layer of teeth.  (more…)

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FIFA World Cup: Luis Suarez Sinks Teeth into Opponent

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

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In the 2014 World Cup, Uruguay’s Luis Suarez was hungry for more than a win.

The star forward bit the left shoulder of Italian opponent, Giorgio Chiellini, late in the team’s final group game on June 24.

Suarez, who earned a 10-match ban in 2013 for biting Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic and a seven-match ban in 2010 for biting a player in the Eredivisie, now has been barred from the rest of this year’s World Cup in Brazil and all football activities and stadiums for four months. As a result, he will miss Uruguay’s next nine internationals and be fined.

There’s little doubt that the player faces much controversy about his dental incident. In the picture at the dentist’s office that shows all of the things that ruin teeth – chewing on ice, gnawing on a pencil, biting fingernails – sinking chompers into an opponent during a soccer game could rank up there.

During the Uruguay-Italy game, the referee gave no card to Suarez, and Chiellini was livid. The Italian defenseman pulled down his jersey to show the teeth marks on his shoulder.

However, in the days following Uruguay’s 1-0 win against Italy and the FIFA’s verdict, Chiellini said the punishment was too harsh.

“I have always unequivocally considered the disciplinary interventions by the competent bodies, but at the same time I believe the proposed formula is excessive,” Chiellini wrote on his blog. “I sincerely hope he will be allowed to stay close to his teammates during the games, because such a ban is really alienating for a player.” (more…)

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Definitive Guide: Quick answers to your oral health questions

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Quick answers oral health questions

In the last several years, there has been a heavy push underlining oral health’s role in systemic well-being. Since the mouth is the gateway to your body, it’s crucial to pay attention to the small daily steps we can take to keep those pearly whites clean and problem-free. To answer your burning questions, from getting rid of bad breath to removing tonsil stones, here are the solutions and oral health tips:

Where is my bad breath coming from?
Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can come from a range of different sources. The main culprits are: food, poor oral hygiene habits, cavities, using tobacco or alcohol, tonsil stones and dry mouth. Most often, the mouth odor comes from what you eat and your dental hygiene habits. The anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that live on the surface of the tongue and throat may derive from foods such as onions, garlic or peppers as well as other pungent foods.

It is likely that bad breath originates from plaque buildup that lingers on the teeth and gums. By failing to remove plaque through brushing, flossing and rinsing, your mouth turns into a habitable environment for the bacteria to grow and produce the foul smell.

Not filling cavities properly and skipping professional dental cleaning contributes to a rotten odor. What’s more, dentures should fit well to prevent bacteria from gathering in pockets.

Smoking or chewing tobacco and drinking alcohol dry out the mouth and cause unpleasant breath, so these habits should be avoided.

A lot of times, not drinking enough water or skipping meals can trigger halitosis. Make sure to gulp down plenty of H2O throughout the day. (more…)

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Athletes Upping Oral Health Game for Improved Performance

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

athletes oral health

After reports from the 2012 London Olympics showed dreadful oral health among athletes, many elite performers have started learning from their mistakes. 

Dentists say athletes stand a better chance of winning if they take care of their teeth, which makes sense, since oral health may reflect overall health.

At the 2012 Games, 55 percent of athletes recruited for dental examinations had cavities, 45 percent had dental erosion and a staggering 76 percent suffered from gingivitis. Nearly half of the participants had not seen a dentist within the previous year. With such a dismal oral health track record, roughly 4 out of 10 athletes said they were bothered by the condition of their mouths, many complaining that it had hindered their training and performance.

At this elite level of play, the margin between winning or losing is so minute that even a small improvement could mean standing on the podium versus going home empty-handed.

Earlier this year at the Sochi Winter Games, Olympians took the advice in stride. There were several dental clinics located in the Olympic Winter Games facilities, where about 600 athletes, officials and coaches visited for screenings, routine dental care – including cavity treatments - and emergency care.

“Maintaining good oral health and hygiene is a critical part of an athlete’s overall health regimen and, in turn, their effectiveness,” Dr. Tony Clough, a consultant during the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, explained to the source. “Surprisingly, however, there are a lot of elite athletes that lack access to care and preventative products.”

Dentists point out that tooth pain can disrupt sleep and inflammation of the gums could impact the rest of the body, worsening performance. But it’s not unheard of for poor oral health to have larger effects. According to the National Institutes of Health, an unhealthy mouth is linked to Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular problems.

Success story 
The boxing team from Great Britain has been improving their oral health as of late, with doctors and dentists looking after athletes’ teeth and gums. The boxers are now receiving regular dental checkups, and brushing and flossing regularly to fight off gingivitis and dental caries (cavities).

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A Breakdown of Statistics on Oral Health: What You Need to Know

Friday, March 14th, 2014

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A smile is universal. Across all cultures, it means happiness, welcomeness and attraction. But if those teeth get dirty, they might send mixed signals. Although some say a smile is only skin deep, it in fact provides a window into your body’s overall health. So, here are 10 takeaway statistics that you should know to keep both your mouth and body clean and healthy:

1. Thirty-four percent of Americans did not visit a dentist last year. Your dental professional can spot things you may not notice, remove dental plaque, provide proper cavity treatment, and at the end of the day, help to brighten your pearly whites.

2. The average American consumes a whopping 600 cans of soda annually. This sugary beverage is among the leading culprits for tooth decay. As an alternative to soda, drink water, which helps wash down harmful acids and food debris.

3. Nearly 50 percent of people say that a smile is the first thing they notice when meeting someone.

4. In a survey on dating, bad breath was found to be the No. 1 turn-off. Check out the best mouthwash for bad breath. Whether you’re meeting for lunch or at a concert, keep sugar-free gum on hand.

5. According to a 2007 French study published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, roughly 6 percent of people have tonsil stones, which are clumps of mucus, dead cells and debris that get caught in the pockets of the tonsils. While many people may not know about this condition, a growing number of Americans have expressed concern in recent years over what they are and what to do with them. Tonsil stones can cause throat irritation and discomfort and can be popped out using Q-tip or oral irrigator.

6. Almost 4 out of 5 Americans have a cavity by age 17. Once secondary (adult) teeth set in, you have to wear that smile for life! So, take care of it.

7. According to a British study from DailyMail, white teeth can make you look 20 percent more attractive. The same study also found that having white teeth makes you up to 16 percent more employable. Tooth whitening options, anyone?

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