Posts Tagged ‘obesity’

Slimmest and Fattest Cities in US

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

slimmest fattest cities US

A new Gallup poll has revealed the cities in the U.S. with the most obese populations. For the third year in a row, the city with the lowest obesity rate in the U.S. continues to be in Boulder, Colo., at 12.4 percent. As for large communities with a population of more than 1 million, Memphis had the highest rate at 31.9 percent. 

As health officials have pointed out, diet affects not only your waistline, but your mouth as well. After consuming food and beverages, your body processes their nutrition and supplies the body with energy, but some of the food particles linger on teeth and gums, causing problems like cavities, gingivitis and bad breath.

Nationwide, the obesity rate jumped to 27.1 percent in 2013, the highest Gallup and Healthways have recorded since tracking started in 2008. Obesity is measured by calculating a person’s body mass index (BMI) score, which takes into account height and weight. BMI scores of 30 or more are considered obese.

The fittest major U.S. communities were Denver-Aurora, Colo., San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, Calif., and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif., whereas the fattest communities were Memphis, Tenn., San Antonio, Texas, and Richmond, Va.

The data reflects the state level results for 2013, which discovered that West Virginia and Mississippi were the most obese states, while Montana and Colorado were the least obese. Three areas in Colorado – Boulder, Fort Collins-Loveland and Denver-Aurora – ranked among the communities with the 10 lowest obesity rates. Colorado is famous for its outdoor recreation and natural landscape, so these results may not be that surprising.

According to the Journal of American Medicine (JAME), more than one-third of U.S. adults (34.9 percent) are obese. No state has met the goal of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Healthy People 2010 initiative to lower obesity prevalence to 15 percent. Only one U.S. metropolitan area has hit the target.

Connection between obesity and oral health problems
Obesity can affect a person’s oral health in two main ways. First, it impacts your diet with what you consume and how often you consume it, which can result in a higher risk of tooth decay. Chowing down on foods with a lot of sugar builds plaque on your teeth – the starting point of most oral health problems for kids and adults.

Secondly, obesity can lead to an increased risk of gum disease. Studies have indicated that the more obese a person is, the higher their chances are of developing gum disease.

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New Study Looks to Brighten Kids’ Smiles

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

1026563_62274978In recent health news, a dental study is examining babies’ teeth to learn how to better prevent tooth decay in young children.

The SMILE study (Study of Mothers’ and Infants’ Life Event affecting oral health), spearheaded by the University of Adelaide, will investigate 1800 kids from birth until two to three years of age.

“We believe that oral health should not be looked at in isolation from other factors in children’s lives, and that a combined preventive approach, targeting both oral health and general health conditions, could yield significantly greater benefits for children,” explains study leader Associate Professor Loc Do, from the Australian research Centre for Population Oral Health at the University of Adelaide’s School of Dentistry.

In the last several years, there has been a push to understand why tooth decay still remains a prevalent issue in the oral health for kids in the U.S. – especially since the trend has worsened in the 2000s. From the early 1970s until the mid-1990s, tooth caries declined in the baby teeth of children ages 2 to 11. However, based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2004, the trend reversed. Children with baby teeth showed a significant rise in decay. In short, cavities are on the up.

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TheraBreath’s Specialty Breath Fresheners can Beat Halitosis for Folks of all Body Types

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Halitosis is inevitable, which is one reason why TheraBreath offers such a wide array of breath freshening products. With so many specialty items available, like toothpastes, alcohol-free mouthwashes, mints, lozenges, tongue scrapers, tooth-whitening kits and probiotics, there’s little excuse for suffering through bad breath.

Of course, getting oral odor is unavoidable. With so many bacteria living on your tongue, cheeks and palate, bad breath is a fact of life. What matters is how you deal with it.

At times, it can seem like your mouth goes from fresh to foul faster than you can say “Robin Redbreast’s bad breath” three times. (It’s a tongue twister. Try it.) Are some people more prone to halitosis? Do people of certain health backgrounds or body types get bad breath quicker or more chronically than others? They sure do.

Some folks get more halitosis based on their habits or personal hygiene. So, for example, someone who brushes their teeth once per day is almost certainly more likely to have a stinky mouth than someone who scrubs their teeth two or three times daily. Individuals with an unenthusiastic oral care routine – one that skips the floss, tongue scraper and mouthwash – have themselves to blame for their oral odor. Similarly, people who smoke, drink heavily or eat pungent foods will naturally have bad breath.

Likewise, using an inferior breath product can allow the mouth to develop halitosis more often. For example, alcohol-based mouthwashes can dry out the palate, leaving you more likely to have bad breath, rather than less. This is why TheraBreath recommends using its specialty breath fresheners, since they are specially formulated to neutralize odor and eliminate bacteria.

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Overweight People More Likely To Have Bad Breath, Study Finds

Monday, December 17th, 2007

The health of your body directly affects the health of your mouth. Obesity is found to be linked to having bad breath.  For the bad breath cure that helps people of all shapes and sizes, turn to Therabreath, the only real solution for bad breath.

ScienceDaily (Dec. 14, 2007) — Now there’s another good reason to go on that diet after the holidays. Tel Aviv University researchers have published a study that finds a direct link between obesity and bad breath: the more overweight you are, the more likely your breath will smell unpleasant to those around you.

The research, led by breath expert Prof. Mel Rosenberg from the Department of Human Microbiology and The  Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, was reported in the Journal of Dental Research in October. The study also reported, for the first time, scientific evidence that links bad breath to alcohol consumption.

“The finding on alcohol and bad breath was not surprising because the anecdotal evidence was already there,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “However, the finding that correlated obesity to bad breath was unanticipated.”

A Weighty Sample

The study was done in Israel and included a sample of 88 adults of varying weights and heights. While at a clinic for a regular check-up, they were asked by graduate student Tsachi Knaan, a co-author in the study, whether he could test the odor of their breath and ask questions about their daily habits.

Prof. Rosenberg, Knaan and Prof. Danny Cohen concluded from the data that overweight patients were more likely to have foul-smelling breath. “This finding should hold for the general public,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “But we don’t have any scientific evidence as to why this is the case. That will be the next step.”

He surmises that the connection between obesity and bad breath could be caused by several factors. Obese people may have a diet that promotes the condition of dry mouth. Prof. Rosenberg also suggests that people who are obese may be less in tune with taking care of their mouths and bodies. “We have certainly opened a window of questions here,” says Prof. Rosenberg.

Halitosis of the Ancient World?

While widespread obesity is a modern invention, bad breath is not. The phenomenon goes back thousands of years.

Says Prof. Rosenberg, “I have read reports of bad breath in ancient Egypt.  In ancient Rome there was a man named Cosmos who sold breath-freshening agents.  Bad breath is frequently mentioned in Jewish scripture  The Talmud stating that if you were a ‘Cohen’ (a priest) you couldn’t perform holy duties on the Temple if your breath was bad.

“If you were a newlywed groom, you could annul a marriage if on your wedding night you discovered that your wife has bad breath. In ancient times, we learn, bad breath was considered a ‘no-no,’ as bad as having leprosy.”

Self-Examination Not a Possibility

The problem remains today. Bad breath — and the fear that you might have it — plagues millions of people because it isn’t easy for one to check one’s own breath. Indeed, nine people in the study were unaware of their bad breath.

Says Prof. Rosenberg, who co-edits the Journal of Breath Research, “I can’t go out into the world and smell everybody’s breath, and quite frankly I’ve already smelled many thousands of cases. My goal now is to give people a list of the potential factors that could lead to this condition, so they can treat themselves.” Obesity is now added to the list, which includes dry mouth, poor dental hygiene, and possibly even the morning cup of coffee.

“You should tell people in your family if they have bad breath,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “It is curable in almost all instances, and it can be a sign of disease. As for work colleagues, they might be happy for the advice, but they might not.”

And don’t be embarrassed if it happens to you, he adds. Even professors of dentistry and experts in the field of bad breath sometimes have malodorous mouths.

Tel Aviv University (2007, December 14). Overweight People More Likely To Have Bad Breath, Study Finds. ScienceDaily.

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