Posts Tagged ‘Listerine’

Drunk as a Skunk, But Very Clean-Smelling

Monday, October 8th, 2007

In related news, a woman who drank three glasses of Listerine is arrested for drunken driving. According to this article, Listerine is actually 26.9% alcohol! Moral of the story: Don’t drink and drive. Moral of the story #2: don’t use alcohol-based mouthwash. Alcohol is a harsh substance that can dry your mouth and actually aggravate bad breath. Therabreath is alcohol-free and is a better alternative.

ADRIAN, Mich. (AP) — A woman who admitted drinking three glasses of mouthwash had a blood-alcohol content more than three times the legal limit when she was arrested for drunken driving, police said Friday.

The woman, identified by police Sgt. Mike Shadbolt as 50-year-old Carol A. Ries, was arrested Sunday night and released on personal bond the next day. She was to be arraigned late next week on a misdemeanor charge of operating under the influence of liquor, Shadbolt said.

Police also found an open bottle of Listerine in Ries’ car, and asked Lenawee County prosecutors Friday to authorize a warrant charging her with having an open intoxicant in a motor vehicle, Shadbolt said. Calls to the prosecutor’s office were not answered after business hours.

Ries showed signs of intoxication after her car rear-ended another vehicle Sunday, Shadbolt said. She told police she had not consumed any alcohol and also passed a Breathalyzer test, but “there was something not quite right about her,” Shadbolt said.

She failed a second test using different equipment and, under further questioning, admitted to drinking three glasses of Listerine earlier in the day, Shadbolt said.

According to Listerine manufacturer Pfizer Inc.’s Web site, original formula Listerine contains 26.9 percent alcohol, more than four times that of many malt liquors. Other varieties contain 21.6 percent alcohol.

No telephone listings for a Carol Ries could be found.

Thanks to Out There reader Daniel H.

(http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,144884,00.html)

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Don’t drink or gargle before you drive – Alcohol in some mouthwashes can lead to false positives in breath tests!

Thursday, October 4th, 2007

What is the first thing that you would do if a cop pulls you over and performs a breath test? If you’ve been drinking slightly, the first thought in your head would be to gargle with some mouthwash to mask the alcohol in your breath. Don’t.A common cause of false readings is alcohol-based mouthwash. The Alcohol in mouthwash can actually increase your blood alcohol content (BAC). Listerine mouthwash, for example, is 27% alcohol.

“Incidentally, Listerine mouthwash can cause a false breath-alcohol test result of 0.43% BAC, which is near the level of coma. These effects last as long as 30 minutes to an hour.” (The Prohibition Times, JUNK SCIENCE: GOVERNMENT TESTS FOR DRUNKDRIVING by John Lee)

Research in Wikipedia also confirms this:

“Mouth alcohol can also be created in other ways. Dentures, for example, will trap alcohol. Periodontal disease can also create pockets in the gums which will contain the alcohol for longer periods. And recent use of mouthwash or breath fresheners—possibly to disguise the smell of alcohol when being pulled over by police—contain fairly high levels of alcohol.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breathalyzer)

Of course, the best way to avoid flunking a breath test is to avoid alcohol entirely. But if you decide to drink moderately enough to be able to drive, and anticipate a breath test, it is a good idea to use non-alcoholic mouthwash. So the next time you go out on a date, you’ll be prepared for literally anything – a kiss, a slow dance, or even a breath test.

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Why Your Oral Products (Mouthwash, Toothpaste, Chewing Gum, Spray, etc) May be GIVING you Bad Breath!

Monday, September 10th, 2007

In order to stop bad breath, you must stop the production of the volatile sulfur compounds. The only safe and clinically-proven way to do so is to “oxidize” away the sulfur compounds and the bacteria that create this problem.

For several decades the large pharmaceutical companies have made commercial products that do not oxidize away the Odorous and Lousy-Tasting Sulfur compounds created by anaerobic bacteria. Many attempt to “help” the public, but merely rely on “masking agents” which essentially cover-up the malodor and sour, bitter tastes produced by the sulfur compounds with other stronger tastes (some medicinal and minty) and fragrances.

Alcohol:

The end result was a “masking chemical” + high levels of alcohol. Alcohol makes your breath worse. Alcohol, in chemical terms, is classified as a DESICCANT, or DRYING AGENT. As you know from information in this website and possibly your own personal problem, the dryer your mouth gets – the worse your breath gets.

Here’s how much alcohol (in Percentage and Proof) is contained in the leading products below:

Product

% Alcohol

As Proof

Other “BAD” Ingredients

You may also ask yourself, “If those common products kill the germs that cause bad breath (like they say they do), then why do I still have bad breath?”

Ingredients in Oral Products

Here are some other “strange” ingredients added to mouthwash and other oral products!

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate: Stop Your Washing Your Mouth With Soap!

Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the ingredients in products they use on a daily basis. For instance, nearly every toothpaste contains an ingredient that has been proven to dry out your mouth, and is now scientifically linked to canker sores. It’s called Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), and is placed into toothpaste (and some mouthwashes) in order to create foaming! (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is also the main ingredient in your shampoo – go check it out.) The harshness of this chemical has been proven to create microscopic damage to the oral tissue which lines the inside of your mouth, which then leads to Canker Sore production. The microscopic damage and “shedding” of vital oral tissues” provides a protein food source to the bacteria that create the volatile sulfur compounds of Halitosis and taste disorders. That’s why TheraBreath Oral Products have never contained Sodium Lauryl Sulfate!

SLS ( sodium lauryl sulfate ) acts just like a detergent. It is used in the laboratory as a membrane destabilizer and solubilizer of proteins and lipids. SLS is used in toothpaste to emulsify (mix) oil and water based ingredients together. In your toothpaste it creates the foam you get when brushing. Since it is classified as a soap, you will easily understand, why this ingredient can cause drying inside the mouth for many individuals. The dryness is one of several factors that will lead to bad breath.

Saccharin:

Would you give Saccharin to your children? Well, you are – when you provide them with Children’s toothpaste from some of the major companies – take a look at their ingredients.

The only toothpaste, formulated to fight bad breath by oxidation AND which does not contain Sodium Lauryl Sulfate & Saccharin is TheraBreath.

Sodium Chlorate:

This is a chemical that is NOT an oxygenating compound. It sounds like a chemical used in oxygenating products, but in order for it to even start to produce oxygenation, the pH of the solution would need to have a pH of -1 (that’s right -1!). Historically, scientific papers refer to many cases of accidental Sodium Chlorate Poisoning. Consequently, oral products containing chlorates were taken off the market in the UK over 60 years ago! (A bibliography of scientific papers on Sodium Chlorate).

Benzalkonium Chloride:

Benzalkonium Chloride had been used for many years as a preservative in eye drops and also in nasal sprays and drops. Recently, researchers in Europe discovered that this preservative was causing a great deal of allergic reaction among users. It is now estimated that fully 10% of the population is allergic to Benzalkonium Chloride.

Other studies have shown a direct relationship between BKC and contact dermatitis, another allergic reaction.

Based on these facts, pharmaceutical companies have started to produce eye and nasal drops WITHOUT BKC in order to provide better products to the public.

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The Effects of Various Foods to your Breath

Monday, September 10th, 2007

As mentioned previously in this website, the bacteria that create the volatile sulfur compounds of bad breath and taste disorders, react to various changes in their environment.

Of course, everyone knows that Onions and Garlic will create bad breath. But do you know why? It’s because the odorous molecules in onions and garlic are actually sulfur compounds themselves, called Mercaptans. (Sulfur is nature’s way of creating odors.) You’re all familiar with the skunk. Its odor is created as a defense and/or attack mechanism. Skunk odor is made up of sulfur compounds (skatoles, etc.) which are natural sulfur compounds.

Food, if it sits out too long will spoil. That action is due to anaerobic bacteria breaking down proteins in that particular food. In milk, the odor of sour milk is caused by relatives of the bugs that create bad breath, when they break down proteins in milk (and all dairy foods). A reaction takes place where ‘the bad breath bugs’ extract sulfur compounds from the amino acids in these proteins. Specifically, the amino acid Cysteine is converted to Hydrogen Sulfide (the rotten egg smell) and Methionine becomes Methyl Mercaptan (which smells like a cross between old socks and garlic.) The same analogy applies to meat if it sits out too long. There are 4 categories of foods that will result in an increase of sulfur production because these categories have a stimulating affect on the bacteria:

1. Drying Agents
2. Dense Protein Foods
3. Sugars
4. Acids

Drying Agents:
The most common drying agent in food is Alcohol. Alcohol of course is the basis of all “adult” beverages such as Beer, Wine, and Hard liquor. It is also used, unfortunately in mouthwash, where it only makes the problem worse.

Alcohol is a drying agent, known chemically as a desiccant. It is used quite often in laboratories to “dry out” hard to reach areas in test tubes and beakers. The same end result takes place in the oral cavity.

To see a list of the alcohol content in Oral Products vs. Adult Beverages, check out the page: “Why Regular Products Don’t Work”

Although cigarettes are not really food, smoking is probably the quickest way to dry out your mouth, with alcohol the second. If you smoke, you are bound to have bad breath!

Dense Protein Foods:
Dairy foods are notorious for creating bad breath. An article in the Los Angeles Times once noted that over 50% of the population in Southern California was “Lactose Intolerant”**. With regards to bad breath, we have found these people (numbering in the tens of millions) end up with MORE dense proteins available as ‘bad breath fuel‘ for the bacteria than those who have no problem with dairy foods (milk, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, etc.) The end result is a buildup of amino acids, which are easily converted into volatile sulfur compounds by the anaerobic bacteria found within the surface of your tongue and throat.

To a lesser extent, we have seen patients who have the same problem with other dense protein foods such as: Beef, Chicken, Fish.

Another problem, thankfully rare, has to do with people who have an inability to break down certain proteins found in beans. This condition is called TMA (Trimethylaminuria) and is sometimes known as the “Fish Odor Syndrome”, because the odor produced is similar to decaying fish. The odor consists of sulfur compounds, plus nitrogen compounds (amines). People with this condition must abstain from beans and other dense protein foods.

Sugars:
Wouldn’t it be great if we could get rid of bad breath by chewing on M&Ms? Or what if the cure for bad breath were Hershey Kisses?

That’s what the makers of ALTOIDS would have you believe. Altoids, and other products of the same ilk, are trying to fool the public into believing that a strong “good” taste in your mouth is equivalent to the “goodness” of your breath. It is so anti-science, as to be absurd. If you think about it for a minute, it doesn’t even make sense.

By using concentrated MINT flavorings, your taste buds pick up MINT as a a taste. However, ALTOIDS, contains 2 types of sugar, which are Fuel for the bacteria to reproduce and create more sulfur compounds. In addition, and here’s the frightening part, other bacteria can take the sugars and produce glycan strands, which in turn end up causing thick layers of plaque on your enamel and around your gums. This leads to tooth decay and gum disease – and of course worse Breath than when you started.

But, since you can’t smell your own breath, you just go merrily along with that great strong mint taste in your mouth, while others close to you are backing away – backing away from your increase bad breath, decayed teeth, and gross swollen, bleeding gums!

Stay away from candies, mints, and chewing gum if they contain sugar.
As an alternative, we have created TheraBreath Oxygenating Chewing Gum. It releases Oxygen molecules directly in your mouth and also contains the antibacterial agent, Zinc Gluconate (found in many cold medications). In addition, as a sweetening agent we chose Xylitol, which is a natural ANTI-DECAY compound (Not SUGAR!) You can order TheraBreath Gum, by clicking the photo on the right:

Acidic Foods
Acidic foods are a problem as you’ll read below. Some foods you should watch out for are:

Coffee – both decaf and regular have acids (Tea is OK)
Tomato Juice

Citrus Juices:
Orange Juice
Pineapple Juice
Grapefruit Juice

pH is a term used to describe the acidity of the environment. (see table) The oral cavity has a normal pH of 6.5 (7 is neutral) which is in the acid range.

We know that acids make the bacteria reproduce much faster. In order to decrease the production of odorous sulfur compounds, we need to neutralize the acid environment. Our products are the only ones to be pH balanced in such a manner to do this most effectively. That is why our products do not leave a strange aftertaste like other products. As one patient recently told me: “I’m so glad I found your products. The taste of (a competitor¹s product) was worse than having the problem.

**According to the NIH (National Institutes of Health), lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, the predominant sugar of milk. This inability results from a shortage of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down milk sugar into simpler forms that can then be absorbed into the bloodstream. When there is not enough lactase to digest the amount of lactose consumed, the results, although not usually dangerous, may be very distressing. While not all persons deficient in lactase have symptoms, those who do are considered to be lactose intolerant. For most people, though, lactase deficiency is a condition that develops naturally over time. After about the age of 2 years, the body begins to produce less lactase. However, many people may not experience symptoms until they are much older. Between 30 and 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75% of all African Americans and American Indians and 90% of Asian Americans are lactose intolerant. The condition is least common among persons of northern European descent.

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