Posts Tagged ‘gum disease’

Pregnant Mothers with Bad Breath May Be Fatal for Babies

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

stillbirths bad breath

Unfortunately, pregnant women with bad breath may have a problem that is staggering in its implications.  Previously, we have discussed the relationship between gum disease and reproductive health (pregnancy gingivitis), which can result in a baby being born prematurely.  Research shows that the bad breath-causing bacteria may even be linked to stillbirths.

Allegedly, the oral bacteria can be transferred to the placenta if it enters the blood stream through open sores in the gums.  The unborn child is not equipped to fight the disease with its immune system in the same manner an adult can. 

Since bleeding gums/pregnancy gingivitis is extremely common among pregnant women, it is vital that expecting mothers brush and floss frequently during the day, after snacks and meals.  Surgery may be needed for serious infections. 

Whereas pregnancy gingivitis is common, the possibility of having a stillbirth is not.  Nonetheless, taking healthy steps will make pregnancy easier and reduce anxiety levels.  Here are some tips for practicing good oral hygiene:

– Go to the dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
– Brush your teeth at least 2-3 times a day, ideally after every meal and snack.  This prevents plaque/tartar building up.
– Floss after every meal.
– Use an oral rinse (like TheraBreath) at least 2 times a day. 
– Use a tongue scraper to prevent the bad breath-causing bacteria from building up.
– Eat healthier (more vegetables, less sweets).

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Periodontal Disease and its Stages

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

Many people (usually around 3 out of 4!) have symptoms of periodontal disease, which is an infection of the tissues supporting your teeth.  These symptoms include persistent bad breath; bleeding gums (especially when you brush); red, swollen, and tender gums; gums that recede from the teeth; pus between the teeth and gums when the gums are pressed; permanent teeth that are loose or separating; changes in your dental structure when biting; and changes in the way dentures fit.  Health gums have a healthy pink color, they do not bleed, and the gum line hugs the teeth tightly. 

 

Here are the various stages of periodontal disease:

1)  Gingivitis:  The gums bleed easily when you brush, floss, or probe them.  The gums are inflamed and sensitive to touch, and there is the possibility of halitosis and bad taste.  The gums between the teeth may look bluish-red in color.

2) Early Periodontitis: The gums may start pulling away from the teeth, and the inflammation and bleeding of the gums is more noticeable.  There is bad breath and bad taste , slight loss of bone (horizontally on X-ray), and there may be pockets of 3-4mm between the teeth and gums.

3) Moderate Periodontitis: The gum may boil, and abscesses may develop.  Since the gums are receding, the teeth appear to look longer.  The front teeth may start to drift, showing spaces.  The person suffering often has chronic bad breath, bad taste, and both horizontal and angular bone loss (on X-ray).  The pockets between the gum and teeth range from 4-6mm deep.

4) Advanced Periodontitis: The teeth become loose or mobile.  Bad breath and bad taste are chronic, and the roots of the teeth are exposed and extra-sensitive to hot and cold temperatures.  On X-ray, there is severe angular and horizontal bone loss, and the pockets between the gum line and teeth are more than 6mm deep.

Gum Disease Cure

So what should you do if you are having any of these symptoms?  You should definitely go and get diagnosed and your teeth cleaned by your dentist.  Also, a good gingivitis cure is PerioTherapy, which is a product line that focuses on gum care.  Try it out!

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85% of People Have Gum Disease, a Major Cause of Bad Breath and Other Problems

Thursday, January 14th, 2010

gum disease

According to the World Health Organization, reports showed that 85% of adults in the US have a type of gum disease, and most are not aware of it.  Various symptoms of gum disease include: swollen, red, tender, bleeding or receding gums; sensitive teeth; obvious plaque, tartar or calculus; persistent bad breath; spaces developing between teeth; or loose or mobile teethBad breath, also known as halitosis, is another common symptom.  These symptoms occur because the body’s immune system is responding to an infection caused by “bad” bacteria in the gums.  People usually ignore the symptoms or don’t take them too seriously, since they probably cannot see the infected regions of the gums.  Just as you would take care of an open wound on your hand, the open wound in your mouth should be remedied.

Why is it so important to treat gum disease as soon as you know that you have it?  Well, gum disease has been linked to major ailments such as:

  • Preterm/Babies with Low Birthweight
  • Respiratory Disease
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Type II Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Blood Clots and Strokes

Knowing this, you should go to the dentist and have him/her diagnose the problem.  The dentist will probably propose a solution to the gum disease (and bad breath!) that includes getting rid of the bad bacteria.  There is also something called PerioTherapy, which is a long-term cure to gum disease.  When treating gingivitis/periodontitis, one must be diligent, otherwise the gum disease can return.

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Gingivitis (a Major Cause of Bad Breath) May Be Genetic

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

gingivitis

More people than you may think have gingivitis–up to half of the U.S. population.  Some people do not even realize that they have it, and they might have common symptoms like bad breath, and/or swollen, red and bleeding gums.  Gingivitis can cause complications like heart disease, pre-term birth, and diabetes if it is not treated.  Most of the time, people think it is caused by a lack of proper oral hygiene or the hormonal changes that occur during a woman’s pregnancy (pregnancy gingivitis). 

A new study, on the other hand, shows that genetics actually can play a major part in the onset and healing of gum disease.  The goal of this study was to pinpoint various changes on a molecular level during the onset and healing processes of the disease.  Research showed that ~30% of the human body’s genes are expressed differently during the formation and healing of gingivitis.  How one reacts to gingivitis depends greatly on how the body’s immune system is activated.  The findings of the study enabled scientists to identify certain biological pathways activated by the onset and remediation of gingivitis, including energy metabolism, immunity response, neural processes, vasculature, chemotaxis, steroid metabolism and wound healing.  The information gathered from this study should certainly help scientists and doctors come up with better cures for gingivitis.

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Forget something? Maybe the reason is in your mouth!

Friday, November 13th, 2009

cognitive function

Did you know that Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, diabetes, and heart disease, can be linked to poor oral health? According to extensive research, various health issues like the ones mentioned can be related to one’s oral hygiene. This is why it is important to brush and floss regularly, as well as visit the dentist for regular checkups.

Researchers have found recently that gum disease can influence brain function in a negative way: gum disease can cause inflammation throughout the body, in turn causing a loss of mental function.

In a study of people ages 60 and older, those with the highest levels of the gum disease-causing pathogen were 3X more likely to have difficulty with verbal memory tests, like recalling a three-word phrase after a period of time. Also, adults with the highest levels of this pathogen were twice as likely to fail three-digit reverse subtraction tests and verbal recall tests.

In the study, the researchers mentioned that there are no epidemiological studies that have shown the relation between periodontitis and cognition, despite the link between periodontitis with stroke and the risk factors of stroke and dementia. However, evidence supports there being a relation between poor oral health and incident dementia. It can be expected that there will be more tests done on this topic in the near future.

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