Posts Tagged ‘gum disease’

Bad Breath in Music

Monday, April 18th, 2011

Music is everywhere within our daily lives. We hear it in the car, at home, on TV and even at the grocery store. Musicians often say they write about everyday life which often includes love, hate, death, fear, job and even bad breath! Here are a few songs from songwriters that don’t tip toe around the subject of halitosis:

Tupac Shakur’s “Check Out Time” is one of the few songs noted to address morning breath.  Shakur writes, “Now I’m up early in the morn’, breath stinkin’ as I’m yawnin’.” The speaker has just woken up in a hotel room. Morning breath is a very common occurrence and can be easily fixed by brushing with TheraBreath toothpaste and then rinsing (without water) with TheraBreath Oral Rinse both before you go to bed and when you wake up. Morning breath is often due to sleeping with your mouth open, which dries out your mouth and leaves a great environment for anaerobic bacteria to cultivate bad breath. To prevent morning breath, make sure to keep hydrated by drinking plenty of water each day. TheraBreath’s line of probiotics is always a great way to keep your breath fresh, especially in the morning.

Blink 182 has a funky song called “Does my Breath Smell?” It’s a big odd because the song doesn’t once ask the actual question or even mention halitosis. It’s mostly a rhetorical question the song writer asks because he is unable to attract members of the opposite sex. Bad breath has been listed as the #1 turn off in people looking for potential partners. Make sure to always have some TheraBreath gum or mints with you so you’re sure to be ready whenever a chance to find a date arises.

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Bad Breath on a Talk Show

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Recently, E! TV’s website posted a short clip of an episode of the Dr. Oz show where Dr. Oz smells a woman’s breath and clearly taken aback by it. While it is a funny scene, and no doubt embarrassing for the woman, Dr. Oz does state that bad breath may be a warning sign of something else and is no laughing matter. It is definitely true that bad breath is not something to be ignored; it may be a symptom of one or more of the following conditions:

Dry mouth and gum disease are often linked to bad breath. This is because the volatile sulfur producing compounds in our mouth that cause bad breath thrive in a dry, anaerobic environment. When our mouths are full of healthy, oxygen-rich saliva, then it is harder for the bacteria to thrive and create bad breath. The best way to avoid dry mouth is to use oral care products that don’t contain alcohol (you may want to check your ingredient labels) and to keep hydrated, drinking plenty of water throughout the day. None of TheraBreath’s products contain alcohol of any sort and are ideal for maintain fresh breath.

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Yogurt: Tooth Decay, Gum Disease and Bad Breath Cure

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

sugarless yogurt

According to Japanese research, sugarless yogurt can serve as another remedy for bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease.  Yogurt had allegedly reduced the levels of hydrogen suphide (a primary cause of halitosis) in 80% of participants in the study conducted by the International Association for Dental Research.  The plaque and gum disease levels were also noticeably lower among those who ate the yogurt. The main bacteria that help reduce bad breath are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

The study group of volunteers ate 90 grams of yogurt every day for six weeks, while maintaining a strict diet, medication intake, and oral hygiene routine. 

People should consider having sugar-free yogurt as a healthy snack, since sugary snacks rank high in causing tooth decay.  According to statistics, 1/4 people have chronic bad breath, and 19/20 have gum disease sometime in their lives!  By cutting down on the consumption of sugary snacks and chocolate and adopting a good oral hygiene routine, one can start adopting better oral health.

Source: BBC News

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Is Bad Breath a Warning Sign of Major Illnesses?

Monday, February 15th, 2010

bad breath

Bad breath (halitosis), especially if its chronic, can sometimes be a symptom of a much more major dilemma. It is very important that people do not overlook this problem, because it can be a sign of a terminal illness. Dental experts have linked halitosis to everything from pneumonia, bronchitis, chronic sinus infections to liver problems, kidney problems, and diabetes. People who have gastritis can have halitosis because of their stomach’s high acidic levels.

Unfortunately, most people do not regard bad breath as a serious problem, and just try to disguise it with peppermint or mouthwash. Halitosis has also been linked to chronic acid reflux and constipation. If one is practicing good oral hygiene, and avoiding foods that cause strong odors like petai, onions, etc., then it is possible that one has a problem that is more than just bad breath.

Many people will find that chewing gum only hides the bad breath and bad tastes temporarily. According to dental experts, 80% of bad breath sufferers have a mouth-related illness causing the problem; however, few people actually make regular visits to the dentist as needed. Tooth decay, cavities, gingivitis, dry mouth (xerostamia, caused by the lack of saliva), and oral cancer all cause halitosis. If a person has gum disease and does not treat it, it can lead to serious damage to the gums and jawbone. Some sources say that mouthwashes containing alcohol have been linked to oral cancer!  TheraBreath is an example of a mouthwash that does NOT have alcohol as an ingredient.

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February is National Pet Dental Month!

Friday, February 5th, 2010

pet health

February is National Pet Dental Month!  According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats allegedly have symptoms of dental disease by age three!  Beyond that, oral disease is also the most commonly diagnosed health issue for our canine and feline friends.  We may hear about bad breath in pets all the time, but that doesn’t mean that it could be caused by something serious. 

Periodontal disease has the same roots in dogs and cats as it does in people.  Bacteria from food can build up in the oral cavity, and if it’s left untreated, the bacteria cause plaque and tartar buildup on the teeth and gumline.  Over time, if the buildup is neglected, periodontitis can form, which is an irreversible condition involving gum inflammation and infection.  If the gums are inflamed, they become separated from the teeth, thus allowing bacteria to enter and attack the tooth’s root.  Furthermore, bacteria can also enter the bloodstream and venture on over to the heart, liver, kidneys, and other organs, and cause serious problems.

These are all reasons as to why it is very important to be proactive about protecting your pet’s health.  Some warning signs that you can look for in your pet are: bad breath, yellow-brown crust on the teeth, bleeding gums, changes in eating/chewing habits, pawing at the mouth, and/or depression.  These are all potential signs that the pet has an infection, and you should schedule a dental checkup as soon as you can.  If the pet is in good health, one should schedule regular veterinarian visits anyway.   A pet owner should schedule a professional cleaning to have the following done: tartar removal, cavity/growth check, diseased teeth extracted, and tooth polishing.  Tooth polishing helps prevent the formation of new plaque/tartar buildup

You should also practice regular brushing with your pet, and follow a home care regimen.  You can introduce toothpaste to your pets by using a small amount on your finger and rubbing it on their teeth.   Make sure to use a toothpaste that is specially made for cats and dogs.  The next step is to have the pet lick the bristles of a toothbrush with the toothpaste on it.  Then, you can begin brushing its teeth.  This should be done twice every week.  Don’t give up if your pet doesn’t seem willing to have its teeth brushed. 

Also, certain pet foods actually help plaque/tartar removal, so you can look for that in stores.  Ask your pet’s doctor for any advice.  Good luck and spread the word!

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