Posts Tagged ‘gum disease cigars’

Past Celebrities and Historical Figures with Bad Breath

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Smoking, consuming alcohol, plaque, gum disease, dry mouth, post nasal drip, and tonsil stones are just a few causes of bad breath. Given the many causes, it’s no wonder that millions of people suffer (and have suffered) from bad breath.

Here are a few high-profile people of the past with bad breath, why they had it, and what they could have done to treat it.

Clark Gable – a famous actor of the 20th century is best known for his role in Gone with the Wind and his strong halitosis.  His co-star Vivien Leigh reportedly complained often of Gable’s bad breath while on-set filming the classic Civil War movie. His foul breath came from his dentures. False teeth and dental bridges can be a source of bad breath, especially when they are not cleaned properly. Perhaps Clark should have washed his dentures in one of TheraBreath’s oral rinses for his on (and off) screen kissing scenes.

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Smoking and Gum Disease, Bad Breath

Friday, August 28th, 2009

Often times, the life expectancy of people who smoke (for a certain length of time) is decreased by 14 years.  Smoking not only alters the body’s immune response and causes bad breath, but it increases the risk of gum disease (periodontal disease) by two to seven-fold.  Of course, the effects that smoking tobacco has on the periodontal tissues depends on how many cigarettes smoked daily and how long the person has sthe habits.  Usually the periodontal tissues of men rather than women are more effected. Also, if you are being treated for gum disease, there are 4,000+ chemicals in cigarettes that slow down the healing of the gums including: formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, ammonia, arsenic.

Smoking also gives a favorable environment for bacteria in the mouth like P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and A.actinomycetemcomitans, because the byproducts of smoking inhibit the mechanisms that restrict the growth of bad bacteria in the oral cavity.  With that said, smoking can encourage the early stages of periodontal lesions.  Smoking cigars and pipes have similar negative effects that cigarettes do on oral health.  So not only does smoking increase the damage that periodontal disease does, but it decreases the gum’s response to treatment, possibly causing refractory disease.  According to resources, if a person quits smoking, it is very likely that the harmful effects of tobacco use (on periodontal health) will gradually be stopped.  Therefore, if you are a smoker with oral health problems, it is definitely the best idea to quit smoking.

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