Posts Tagged ‘grinding teeth’

Scared of Receding Gums? Here’s What You Should Know

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

scared receding gums

Worried that your gum line is gradually eroding? There are ways to help.

Gum recession, where the margin of gum tissue that surrounds the teeth wears away, is a fairly common dental problem. Most people don’t realize they have it because it occurs over a long period of time. However, when gums pull back and expose more of the tooth, pockets start to form between the teeth and the gum line. This makes it easy for disease-causing bacteria to accumulate.

Causes of gum recession
The first way to take action is to know what triggers gums recession.

Periodontal diseases: Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis (early stage gum disease) and periodontitis (late stage gum disease) are the main causes of gum recession. These bacterial gum infections destroy tissue and supporting bones that hold your teeth in place.

Aggressive tooth brushing: People who hold their brushes too firmly and scrub too hard or the wrong way may cause tooth enamel to wear away and gums to recede. It’s also important to replace toothbrushes or tooth heads for electric toothbrushes every two to three months, since bacteria can start to gather on bristles.

Inadequate dental care: Not visiting the dentist enough combined with insufficient brushing and flossing fosters plaque buildup, which turns into tartar, the hard substance that can only be removed by a professional dental cleaning.

Genes: Due to genetic factors, some people are more susceptible to gum disease. Research suggests that 30 percent of the population may be predisposed to gum disease, no matter how well they care for their teeth.

Tobacco products: Cigarettes, cigars, chew and other tobacco products are a big culprit of gum disease, since the chemicals create sticky plaque that damages teeth. In addition, it may cause dry mouth, tooth decay and smoker’s breath.

Hormonal changes: Varying hormone levels associated with life events such as puberty, menstruation, pregnancy or menopause can make gums more sensitive and vulnerable to gum recession. (more…)

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Top Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

lady-mouth-hurtsIs it painful when you drink really cold beverages or eat ice cream? Tooth sensitivity can arise for a number of reasons, and it can make it difficult to enjoy some of your favorite foods and drinks. From using harsh whitening treatments to having a high amount of dental plaque on the teeth, your tooth sensitivity may not be entirely treatable, but you can take measures to ease the pain. Here are a few of the top reasons why you may have sensitive teeth:

Teeth whitening
If you’ve used at-home teeth whitening products, this could be a major contributor to your sensitive teeth. Are those pearly whites worth the pain? Teeth whiteners penetrate into the tooth to increase blood flow and pressure, which can irritate the nerve ending. Also, tooth whiteners are working to strip away the layer of enamel that is stained. When your tooth has less enamel, your tooth becomes more sensitive.

However, you don’t have to forget about white teeth forever! TheraBreath Dental Professional Whitening Kit promotes a whiter smile without the negative side effects. The combination of dental-office-strength peroxide gel and post-whitening remineralization gel gets the teeth beautiful, shiny and protects against nerve pain. While you might notice some slight sensitivity as well as gum discoloration right after applying, this will go away 24 hours after using it. This product is one of the safest available on the market.

Toothpaste
Additionally, if your toothpaste contains whitener, it can be causing you sensitivity just like traditional teeth whiteners. If you take a look at the paste you are using, it’s likely that it has a gritty texture. While this works to literally scrub away stains, it is also abrasive to enamel. Make sure to stick to toothpaste with natural ingredients, which won’t increase your sensitivity.

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Tooth Enamel Erosion and Prevention

Friday, January 13th, 2012

The strongest and hardest tissue in the human body is tooth enamel. Two percent of enamel is comprised of organic material—protein, lipids and citrate. The other 98 percent consist of water and the minerals calcium hydroxylapatite and calcium fluorapatite (1). Enamel completely envelops other components of the tooth structure, including the dentin, cementum and dental pulp. Enamel protects teeth against the daily wear of biting and chewing. It enables the teeth to withstand hot and cold temperatures, acid and other chemicals which have an erosive effect on teeth. (1, 2, 3).

Tooth enamel ranges in thickness from 2.5 to 3.0 millimeters. It appears white, but actually has a semi-translucent color. The enamel receives it white appearance from the dentin underneath. Coffee, tea, wine, and cigarette smoking discolors are some of the main reasons for discolored tooth enamel (3).

Causes of Tooth Enamel Erosion

Enamel has a high mineral content, which makes it vulnerable to “demineralization” from ingested foods, which contain starch and sugar.

Sugar

Candy, soft drink, fruit juices, and other sweets leave a large amount of sugar coatings on the oral cavity. Sugar may constitute the single largest contributor to enamel erosion. Bacteria flourish on sugar and generate lactic acid, which eats into the enamel.

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