Posts Tagged ‘green tea’

The Best Mouthwash is One that Neutralizes Odor Naturally

Monday, November 7th, 2011

Use a common, alcohol-based mouthrinse, and you may find that your bad breath does not go away over time – or worse, that it slowly intensifies. At TheraBreath, we understand this problem. We believe that the best mouthwash is one that neutralizes halitosis naturally while moistening your mouth and keeping its pH balanced.

If you believe that irritation caused by alcoholic mouthwashes is an uncommon occurrence, think again. Numerous studies have  addressed the connection between canker sores and the synthetic chemicals found in typical oral rinses. Likewise, plenty of consumers complain about the ineffectiveness of these products.

For instance, in a recent letter to the UK Telegraph’s LifeCoach column, a reader noted that they suffer from chronic halitosis, even though they clean their teeth regularly. Nutritionist Sara Stanner responded that the best mouthwash, toothpaste and dental care regimens in general are those that promote oral moisture.

She emphasized that merely stimulating natural salivation can reduce the level of bad breath. At TheraBreath, we go one step further by providing products with natural ingredients that both encourage and preserve the production of moisture in the mouth.

Consider the new TheraBreath PLUS Oral Rinse, an oxygenating formula mouthwash containing zinc, tea tree oil, green tea, aloe vera, xylitol and mint oils. These substances do wonders for bad breath by attacking oral microbes and neutralizing their odor compounds.

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Green Tea Helps Prevent Halitosis

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

green tea

There are various food products that help control the bad breath smell that exists in people’s mouths.  As we have previously discussed, halitosis is primarily caused by the volatile sulfur compounds (also known as VSCs) like H2S and CH3SH produced in the mouth.  Bacteria in the mouth convert proteins into substances cysteine and methionine, and these are metabolized into VSCs.  In general, halitosis cures focus on controlling the number of “bad” bacteria in the mouth. 

There is a strong relationship between the natural antioxidants of green tea and good health, since it has been shown to have antimicrobial and deodorizing effects.  For instance, green tea can encourage strength, energy, and decrease a person’s chance for getting cancer.  Methyl mercaptan, as you may have previously read, is one of the foul-smelling volatile sulfur compounds that cause bad breath.  Along with other plant extracts, green tea extracts were analyzed with gas chromatography to see how strong their effects were on neutralizing the smell of methyl mercaptan. 

Research has shown that green tea extracts can deodorize multiple foul-smelling compounds in a person’s mouth, which can exist there from eating meat, smoking tobacco, and so on. 

The components and properties of green tea can help decrease the chances of someone having cavities and gum disease.  It helps mimize the effects of bleeding gums by helping the blood in the mouth clot. 

The deodorizing activity of green tea polyphenols is actually stronger than that of sodium copper chlorophyllin, a derivative of chlorophyll that is known to reduce odors.  Green tea also inhibits a bacteria called Streptococcus mutans, which is a major cause of tooth decay.  Green tea polyphenols also have a lot of positive effects for health issues outside of the oral cavity.  

Sources: Chemistry and Applications of Green Tea by Takehiko Yamamoto
Centre national de la recherche scientifique

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Green Tea Prevents Bad Breath

Friday, August 7th, 2009

Studies are showing that green tea can eliminate bad breath (halitosis). Thus far, green tea has been used for countless things:  preventing cancer, stroke, heart disease, weight loss, and so on.  Green tea has polyphenols, which are antioxidants that protect cells from damage.  The tea extracts help rid the body of disease-causing organisms since the antioxidants raise the body’s immune system. 

The malefic bacteria in our mouths can cause tooth decay and bad breath.  Pace University recently did a study on how effective green tea is at getting rid of bad breath.  In this research project, they mixed green tea with the bacteria that cause tooth decay and strep throat.  Results showed that green tea inhibited the bacterial growth by 30% and decreased the amount of bad breath-producing compounds.  Drinking green tea may also help one prevent getting sore throats and colds, since it helps fight the bacteria harboring in the throat. 

This same study also proved that green tea helps toothpaste and mouthwash fight viruses by eliminating bacteria.  Although, when researchers added green tea to the toothpaste, the bacteria were fairly inhibited, helping the toothpaste effectively fight off the oral viruses.  The malefic bacteria that multiply in the mouth create bad breath-causing compounds.  The tea inhibits these pathogens and helps destroy the foul-smelling compounds, thus putting a halt to bad breath.  Green tea also helps remove plague buildup within your gums and teeth.  Plague is another contributor to bad breath.

Tips to use green tea to combat bad breath:

1)  Drink plenty of green tea.
2)  Use it as a mouthwash.  Rinse your mouth with it before and after brushing your teeth. 
3)  Mix it with your toothpaste before toothbrushing.
 
So for now, skip conventional breath mints– sugar only will make halitosis worse.

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Green Tea May Help Prevent Periodontitis

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

According to research done among middle-aged Japanese, the risks of having periodontitis (gum disease) decreased as their consumption of green tea increased.  The symptoms of gum disease, including receding and bleeding gums, decreased for each cup of green tea they drank on a daily basis.

Obviously this does not mean that having green tea is a replacement for seeing the dentist or practicing good oral hygiene.   One of the researchers of this study, Dr. Yoshihiro Shimazaki, told Reuters Health that the relationship between the consumption of green tea and having a lower risk of gum disease was not strong enough to alter one’s oral hygiene.  Practicing good overall oral care is most important.

The researchers had studied 940 men between ages 49-59 for periodontal disease symptoms in Fukuoka, Japan. The research also involved a questionnaire on topics like smoking, drinking, tooth-brushing habits and green tea consumption.

The studies showed that as one drank more green tea, the likeliness of getting gum disease decreased even with the influence of other lifestyle factors. However, the researchers lacked information on the men’s overall diet, which could have included other nutrients that can protect against gum disease.

Green tea has antioxidant compounds called polyphenols, which would be the reason it would combat gum disease.  Research shows that green tea polyphenols can hinder the strength of the bacteria causing gum disease and the damage it causes.

SOURCE: Journal of Periodontology, March 2009.

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