Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Gum disease a silent epidemic for seniors

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

“Savvy Senior” tells us about gum disease — the current statistics, the causes and effects, and the simple preventive measures we can take. Gum disease is more common — and more dangerous than you think. Periotherapy and good oral hygiene are the best weapons against gum disease.

Gum disease — silent but deadly.

October 16, 2007

Dear Savvy Senior: I recently read that gum disease can cause all different types of deadly health conditions. As a senior who brushes regularly and flosses occasionally, what can you tell me about this? — Hate to Floss

Dear Floss: By taking better care of your mouth (which includes daily flossing), you could actually add years to your life! Here’s what you should know.

Dental Services If you don’t have dental insurance or can’t afford professional dental care, some communities and clinics offer discounted or free services to seniors in need, and most dental schools offer low-cost checkups and cleanings. Contact your state dental association (see www.ada.org/ada/organizations ) or your Area Agency on Aging (call (800) 677-1116 to get your local number) to find out what may be available in your area. Also check out the Bureau of Primary Health Care ( www.ask.hrsa.gov/pc ; (888) 275-4772) and the National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped ( www.nfdh.org — click on “Donated Dental Services” or call (888) 471-6334).

Gum disease

Bleeding GumsAlso known as periodontal disease, gum disease is a silent epidemic in this country. Currently, 80 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of gum disease – which ranges from simple gum inflammation (called gingivitis), to serious a disease (called periodontitis) that can infect the gums, bone and other tissue surrounding the teeth.

Consequences

If you have gum disease, you have greatly increased your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. How? Because the bacteria-rich plaque that builds up on your teeth (that’s what causes gum disease) releases toxins into your bloodstream that can inflame your arteries and cause small blood clots. But that’s not all. There are other health problems linked to gum disease such as pancreatic cancer, respiratory diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach ulcers and even pregnancy complications.

Are you at risk?

Most people develop gum disease because they simply don’t keep their mouths clean. But there are other factors that can increase your risk, including:
• Smoking: Need another reason to quit? Smoking is the number one risk factor for gum disease.
• Age: Older people have a greater risk of periodontal disease because they have more wear and tear on their gums.
• Genetics: If you have a family history of gum disease your risk goes up.
• Medications: Some medications (antihistamines, antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, some heart medicines and many others) can cause dry mouth, and the lack of saliva contributes to gum disease. If you have dry mouth, talk to your doctor or dentist.
• Deficient diet: A diet lacking proper amounts of calcium and vitamin C can contribute to gum disease too.
• Hormonal changes: Changes that occur during pregnancy, menopause or even menstruation can make gums more susceptible for women.
• Diabetes: People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing gum disease. It also makes blood glucose levels harder to control.

Savvy Tip: Check your risk for gum disease at www.perio.org — click on “Assess Your Gum Disease Risk.”

Simple solutions

It only takes about five minutes a day to keep your gums healthy. Here are some simple and familiar ways you can take the bite out of gum disease:
Floss guy• Brush: At least twice a day brush your teeth using fluoride toothpaste and learn how to brush properly. See www.webmd.com/oral-health for a refresher course on brushing and flossing. Also use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. Hard or stiff bristles are more likely to injure your gums. And be sure to replace your brush every three months or so. (Tip: Power toothbrushes with rotating or vibrating bristles have shown to be more effective at removing plaque than manual brushes. See www.oralb.com for oral care products.)
• Floss: Do it at least once a day either before or after you brush. The sequence doesn’t matter as long as you do a thorough job. Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line and is absolutely necessary.• Get checkups: See your dentist every six months for regular cleanings and oral exams.

Source: (http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com)

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Tooth loss may predict later-life dementia: study

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Megan Rauscher explains why the loss of your teeth may predict the loss of your sanity later in life. Lack of proper gum care causes or aggravates unhealthy gums, weakening of teeth, and eventual loss of teeth. Dr. Harold Katz, of course, has a solution. Periotherapy keeps gums healthy and teeth intact.

TheraBreath

Don’t lose your teeth, and your mind

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – To keep dementia at bay, take care of your teeth. That seems to be the message of a new study in which researchers found a possible link between tooth loss or having very few teeth — one to nine, to be exact — and the development of dementia later in life.

The research team analyzed dental records and brain function test results accumulated over 12 years for 144 people enrolled in the Nun Study – a long-term study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease among Catholic sisters of the School Sisters of Notre Dame. The participants ranged in age from 75 to 98 years.

Among subjects free of dementia at the first cognitive exam, those with no teeth or fewer than nine teeth had a greater than 2-fold increased risk of becoming demented later in life compared with those who had 10 or more teeth, the researchers found.

Roughly one third of subjects with fewer than nine teeth, or no teeth, had dementia at the first cognitive exam.

Dr. Pamela Sparks Stein of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and associates report their findings in The Journal of the American Dental Association.

A number of prior studies have shown that people who suffer from dementia are more likely than their cognitively intact counterparts to have poor oral health, largely due to neglect of oral hygiene.

The current study is one of only a few that asked: Does poor health contribute to the development of dementia? These results suggest it may, although the Kentucky team cautions that it is not clear from the study whether the association is “causal or casual.”

“Common underlying conditions may simultaneously contribute to both tooth loss and dementia,” Stein noted in comments to Reuters Health. In addition to gum disease, early-life nutritional deficiencies, infections or chronic diseases that may result simultaneously in tooth loss and damage to the brain, she explained.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Dental Association, October 2007.

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Bad Breath: You Are What You Eat – Dr. Katz interviewed by WGAL news

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

Expert: Odor Sticks Around Until Food Leaves System

This piece comes to us from Michele Biaso of WGAL news in Lancaster, PA, who recently interviewed Dr Katz about the relationship of what you eat and how your breath smells.

Michele Biaso, Staff writer

There you are in the office, sitting down for a meeting when something catches your attention.

It’s the girl from accounting sitting next to you. You are convinced she ate a raw onion on her lunch break. She has no idea that the slice of onion in the pita wrap she ate an hour ago is causing people in the meeting to slowly scoot their chairs farther away.

Halitosis — or bad breath — is more common than people think.

Dr. Harold Katz said one-third of the population suffers from bad breath and some don’t even know it.

“That’s because you can’t smell your own breath,” he said, adding that your brain gets used to your own odor, a process called acclimation.

Katz, founder of California Breath Clinics, said the foods you consume play a direct role in odors you emit from your mouth.

open-mouth.jpg According to the American Dental Association, mouth odors will continue until the body eliminates the food. So from the time you take a bite of that garlic bagel, it becomes absorbed in the bloodstream, gets transferred to the lungs and is then expelled you give off a scent.

Obvious foods such as garlic, onions and curry can directly cause bad breath because they contain sulfur compounds, which is what people smell in bad breath. But Katz said there are less obvious foods that can make your breath clear a room.

Feeding Bacteria In The Mouth

One bad breath myth he wants to debunk is that bad breath comes from the stomach.

In almost every case, he said, a smelly mouth is caused by bacteria that breed beneath the surface of the tongue, throat and tonsils.

Some foods play an indirect role because they provide fuel for the anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that produce chronic halitosis, he said.

Katz said dairy foods like milk, cheese and yogurt can also cause breath problems.

“They contain dense proteins that these nasty bacteria use as a fuel source to create odors,” he said.

What you drink is also important in keeping your breath fresh.

Coffee is a problem because it is very acidic. Katz said bacteria love an acidic environment because they can reproduce faster.

Candy and gum that contain sugar are also major problems because sugar feeds the bacteria. And Katz doesn’t recommend adult beverages either, because alcohol makes the mouth dry, allowing the bacteria to breed.

Those cutting calories should also be careful.

“When one diets, saliva is diminished so there is less natural protection,” Katz said. Also, when the body also starts to break down stored fats, which Katz said can lead to a different kind of bad breath.

Body builders are notorious for this problem because of their high intake of whey protein, which they use to bulk up muscle. Whey protein contains high concentrations of amino acids that contain high amounts of sulfur.

“High-protein diets are a problem because the bacteria create odors by breaking down amino acids in proteins. Then they excrete sulfur compounds as their ‘poop,'” he said.

Water Washes Away Stink

Katz said the best thing people can do to keep their breath fresh is to drink six to eight glasses of water per day. Drinking tea is also a good idea, he said.

Saliva is nature’s way of keeping your breath fresh.

“Saliva contains a high percentage of oxygen, which is the natural enemy of anaerobic bacteria,” he said. “The more saliva, the fresher your breath.”

Katz said foods that contain a lot of water also help. Celery, cucumbers, grapes, zucchini and carrots all have high water content.

Foods that are juicy, such as watermelons and strawberries, also ward off bacteria because they encourage saliva production.

If you can’t stay way from the garlic, onions and other stench-creating foods, Katz said to use an oxygenating mouthwash and toothpaste.

Katz, creator of TheraBreath System formulas, said oxygen compounds in the mouthwash and toothpaste attach themselves to the sulfur compounds and create a non-odorous compound.

therakit.jpg

Mouthwashes that contain alcohol defeat the purpose by creating a dry mouth, Katz said.

Breakfast Important To Odor

One thing Katz recommends is to eat breakfast every day. He said people who skip breakfast tend to have horrible breath because a morning meal stimulates saliva production immediately.

“When one sleeps, there is no saliva production. So, you literally have a sulfur factory in your mouth for seven to eight hours since there is no natural saliva or oxygen to fight the anaerobic bacteria.”

And as your dentist has been telling you since your first visit, brushing your teeth is always a great defense.

According to the ADA, food can collect between the teeth, on the tongue and around the gums. It can then rot, causing an unpleasant odor.

If you don’t brush and floss daily, particles of food remain in the mouth and collect bacteria. This can contribute to halitosis.

In most cases, Katz said, the food you eat will not make you smell bad forever.

“Once saliva kicks in, most people return to fresh breath,” he said.

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Your Toothpaste May be Giving you Canker Sores (and bad breath)

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Canker sores, also known as “mouth ulcers” plague the lives of millions of people all over the world. These small oral ulcers can make life unbearable when eating, drinking, speaking, or swallowing. Frustration sets in when your dentist or doctor doesn’t know how to respond to your questions about these annoying and recurring ulcerations.

Unfortunately, the public ends up creating their own “canker sore” problem, by using commercial toothpastes, which contain an ingredient that has been proven to be linked to canker sores. It’s called Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), and is placed into toothpaste (and some mouthwashes) in order to create foaming. (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is also the main ingredient in your shampoo).

The harshness of this chemical has been proven to create microscopic damage to the oral tissue which lines the inside of your mouth, which then leads to Canker Sores.

The Science of Canker Sores:
For discussions sake, several terms are interchangeable. Canker Sores are also known as: Mouth Ulcers, Aphthous Ulcers, Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, or Oral ulcers.

Some people (and doctors) confuse canker sores with “cold sores” (fever blisters). We know both are painful, annoying, and recurring. Here are the major differences:

Canker Sores
-only occur inside the mouth
-not contagious
-not viral (not caused by a virus
-Caused by damage to oral tissue, often by Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, a common foaming agent ingredient in almost all toothpaste.
Cold Sores
– Mostly on outside of mouth – sometimes on the inside of the mouth, but only on “hard” surfaces (palate).
-Contagious
-not viral
-The first sign is appearance of small blisters (vesicles)

What Causes Canker Sores ( Mouth Ulcers)?
The latest research shows that certain chemical compounds trigger the production of canker sores. Among those items is something that may shock unsuspecting people. It’s SOAP. Yes, but it’s soap, inside your mouth. For many years the major pharmaceutical companies have used Soap (chemically known as Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) in order to create a foaming agent when one brushes their teeth. The reason? The foam does not provide any benefits to the toothpaste, but does “fool” the user (YOU) into thinking that a foaming action is related to a “cleansing” action. After speaking to many of these pharmaceutical companies, the following excuse is used: “We use Sodium Lauryl Sulfate as a surfactant, in order to blend all of our ingredients together and make them work more effectively.” (A surfactant is a chemical agent, which allows other chemical molecules to get closer to each other. However, there are many surfactants out there that are not soapy or do not cause allergic reactions, resulting in canker sore production.”

One of the most exciting advances has been the establishment of the link between canker sores and an ingredient common to almost all toothpastes. The additive SLS or sodium lauryl sulfate may be a culprit in canker sore formation.

SLS ( sodium lauryl sulfate ) acts just like a detergent. It is used in the laboratory as a membrane destabilizer and solubilizer of proteins and lipids. SLS is used in toothpaste to emulsify (mix) oil and water based ingredients together. In your toothpaste it creates the foam you get when brushing. Since it is classified as a soap, you will easily understand, why this ingredient can cause drying inside the mouth for many individuals. The dryness is one of several factors that will lead to bad breath. To avoid this, you must stop using toothpaste that contains SLS. Also, to avoid dryness and bad breath, I recommend toothpaste that oxidizes the mouth, and mouthwash that does not contain alcohol (a drying agent).

The thought is that SLS may, in susceptible individuals, cause microscopic trauma or membrane disruption to the skin cells in the mouth. This along with trauma or actions of the immune system may lead to canker sore formation.

Recent studies have shown a link between the use of toothpastes containing SLS and the occurrence of RAS (canker sores).

The following is a synopsis of 3 European Scientific Studies:
In a study at the University of Oslo in Oslo, Norway, Drs. Barvoll and Brokstad revealed a 60-70% reduction in the number of canker sores in patients who used SLS free toothpaste during the 3 month test period. Additional studies have since shown equally promising results.

In the clinical studies, patients using SLS toothpaste displayed a greater amount of desquamation (loss of a layer of skin lining the inside of the mouth). This has led to the theory that SLS may contribute to RAS (canker sores) by causing injury to the oral epithelial cells (skin cells lining the inside of the mouth).

SLS, by denaturing protective mucus proteins, may also disrupt the protective layer of mucus which lines the inside of the mouth (a denatured protein is a protein which has lost its three dimensional shape thereby becoming nonfunctional and useless). The denaturing of mucus proteins makes the cells lining the mouth more susceptible to injury and canker sore formation.

References
1. Herlofson, Bente and Pal Barkvoll Sodium lauryl sulfate and recurrent aphthous ulcers: A preliminary study Acta Odontol Scand 1994; 52:257-259

2. Herlofson, Bente and Pal Barkvoll The effect of two toothpaste detergents on the frequency of recurrent aphthous ulcers Acta Odontol Scand 1996; 54(3): 150-153

3. Barkvoll, Pal and G. Rolla Possible effects of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on the oral mucosa [abstract] J Dent Res 1989; 68:991

What has been especially exciting is the fact that many of my patients have experienced tremendous improvements as a result of using SLS free toothpaste. Additionally, many of the visitors to this website have also found canker sore relief by using an SLS free toothpaste.

Research is being conducted to determine what makes a person susceptible to canker sores in the first place as well as what actions and mechanisms trigger canker sore outbreaks. Among those things that may trigger an attack or make a person more susceptible are:

A. SLS found in Toothpaste and some mouthwashes
B. Allergies to Food Products and Certain Preservatives
C. Trauma from Brushing your Teeth too vigorously
D. Lip Biting
E. Stress
F. Trauma from Eating Hard, Rough Foods (Potato Chips, Pretzels)
G. Deficiencies in Vitamin B12, iron, and folic acid.

Current theories on the causes of canker sores have focused on the immune system. This research suggests that canker sores may be caused by the body’s own immune system attacking the cells lining the inside of the mouth.

The first canker sores usually occur between the ages of 10 and 20. During life, episodes usually, but not always, become less frequent and less severe. Interestingly, women often report increased susceptibility to canker sore formation during certain times of their menstrual cycle. Some women report complete relief from canker sores during pregnancy.

Interestingly, canker sores ( mouth ulcers ) affect people to varying degrees of severity. Some people may get an occasional outbreak of canker sores once or twice a year while others may suffer near continuous overlapping episodes of canker sores ( mouth ulcers ).

On the Subject of Preventing Canker Sores (Mouth Ulcers)
The most important piece of advice we can give you is to stay away from toothpaste which contains Sodium Lauryl Sulfate. Examine your toothpaste’s ingredient section and see if it contains SLS. You will be saving yourself a lot of pain in the long run. I recommend Therabreath, created in the California Breath Clinics, a clinic that has treated over 13,000 people with bad breath. It doesn’t contain SLS (you’ll notice that it doesn’t create as much bubbles) but does a better job of cleaning your mouth. Avoiding SLS is avoiding canker sores, which no one wants to have.

Secondly, trauma to the inside of the mouth may trigger the production of canker sores. This trauma includes overzealous tooth brushing, biting your cheek or tongue, and scraping the inside of your mouth with hard or sharp foods (like hard pretzels).

Cut down on eating foods like potato chips, hard pretzels, cut apples, and hard candies which might nick, abrade, or otherwise traumatize the oral tissue.

As far as overzealous brushing, most people can not consciously stop brushing so hard, because tooth brushing is such an ingrained habit. Find a soft nylon toothbrush and brush your teeth gently. One is available here.

We know that many bite the insides of their cheeks while sleeping or out of nervousness and stress. We suggest that a mouth guard be worn during sleep. This is often very effective at preventing further oral trauma. Contact your dentist for more information.

Reactions to certain food products may be responsible for many cases of canker sores. Among the foods that may cause canker sores in certain people are: nuts, peanut butter, sea food, wheat products, chocolate, and milk.

Treatment of Canker Sores (Mouth Ulcers)

Usually canker sores clear within 7-14 days without treatment. During this time, however, the canker sores can be painful especially when people eat or drink. Treatment helps ease the pain and may help reduce the amount of time it takes for the ulcers to go away.

Other Viable Treatments:

1. Anti-Microbial Mouthwashes
Surprisingly the use of anti-microbial mouthwashes has provided effective relief for many. Canker Sores are not caused by a bacteria or virus so the mechanisms by which these anti-microbial mouthwashes work remains unclear. Commonly used are anti-microbial Oxygenating mouthwashes.

2. Analgesic (Pain Relieving) and Protective Ointments and Gels:
Your local drug stores stocks some pain relieving medications, including Zilactin or Oragel. After application, they create a protective cover over the sensitive areas.

3. Corticosteroid Rinses and Gels:
These are prescription medications that must be authorized by your dentist or physician and should only be used for severe or painful cases. The application of these types of gels and rinses may be painful at first. The most common is a topical steroid gel (non-alcoholic) of lidex applied very gently to the ulcer 2-4 times per day.

Systemic Conditions Associated with Canker Sores (Mouth Ulcers)
In a very small number of cases, canker sores may be indicative of a bodily (systemic) disorder. A medical condition known as Behcet’s Disease, for instance, has amongst its symptoms: canker sores, genital lesions, eye lesions, and dermal afflictions.

Those infected with HIV may also develop “canker sore like” ulcers.

Some digestive conditions display canker sores as part of their disorder. These include: Crohn’s Disease, Celiac Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and gluten hypersensitivity (wheat allergy).

Consult your physician if any of the above sound like they may be part of your “canker sore” problem.

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The Therabreath System

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Our Product Formulations: An Overview

TheraBreath, AktivOxigen, and TheraBrite are the first chlorine dioxide based products to be sold in retail stores. They are based on clinically-proven formulas developed and tested for many years on thousands of patients at the California Breath Clinics by Dr. Harold Katz. (TheraBreath PLUS & PerioTherapy are available only from us on-line or by phone order.)

Many people have tried to copy our products and their formulations, but as hard as they try, they always come up short. The reason: Our products are made with proprietary pharmaceutical-grade chlorine dioxide and specific oxychlor complexes, both in the active and stabilized formats, using technology developed by the leading scientists in this field. Despite what jealous competitors may say, we use chlorine dioxide in our products at concentrations sufficient enough to make us the best-selling, direct to the public brand, both in the U.S. and worldwide. No one comes close.

When GNC (natural heath product retailers) went searching for the BEST oral products for their very selective customers, they chose TheraBreath, TheraBrite, and AktivOxigen from the California Breath Clinics. When Wegmans Supermarkets wanted the finest breath products, they chose TheraBreath, and when Walgreens searched the ClO2 market, they chose TheraBreath as their exclusive professional breath product. When SelfCare Catalog dropped Profresh because of poor sales, they chose AktivOxigen and TheraBrite.

We do not use any alcohol, detergents (sodium lauryl sulfate), saccharin, artificial colors or artificial flavors in any of our formulas. We do not need to use bleach to generate ClO2 (bleach is used in Profresh). And, we don’t need to fool the public by creating strong medicinal or minty masking flavors, because our formulas work!

If you’re looking for definitive scientific proof on which oral product reduces VSC safely and rapidly, just look at these independent tests from June, 2000.

TheraBreath Nasal Sinus Drops:
The first Oxygenating Solution To attack Bad Breath and Mucous/Post Nasal Drip BEYOND the tongue, sinus, throat, and tonsils. All Natural Triple Strength formula prevents anaerobic bacteria from producing volatile sulfur compounds. No preservatives (no allergens like Benzalkonium Chloride) or artificial flavors.

Simply tilt your head back and squeeze out 3-4 drops into each nostril during the day to get to the source of the problem! And, because it’s all natural, there’s no danger in using too much. If you have post nasal drip, allergies, dry mouth, or tonsils, this product, in conjunction with our other clinically-proven oral products, is the best recommended solution.

The ingredients are: Purified and filtered water, Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized oxychlor compounds), zinc gluconate, sodium bicarbonate, tea tree oil, essential oil of spearmint, citric acid, sodium benzoate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil.

There is no ephedra or drugs used in the formula. All of the components are derived from plants or nature.

Click Here to Order

TheraBreath Nasal-Sinus Spray:
Same powerful formula as our Nasal Sinus Drops, but packaged in a convenient spray bottle. Simply displense 1-2 powerful ‘spritzes’ into your sinuses and feel the oxygenating power of OXYD-8 go to work BEYOND your tongue, sinuses, throat, and tonsils. All Natural Triple Strength formula prevents anaerobic bacteria from producing volatile sulfur compounds. No preservatives (no allergens like Benzalkonium Chloride) or artificial flavors.

Simply place the spray bottle into each nostril and dispense 1-2 ‘spritzes’. With the Nasal Sinus Spray, some patients may notice a slight burning – this is normal and is due to the Tea Tree Oil. If you have post nasal drip, allergies, dry mouth, or tonsils, this product, in conjunction with our other clinically-proven oral products is for YOU!

The ingredients are: Purified and filtered water, Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized oxychlor compounds), zinc gluconate, sodium bicarbonate, tea tree oil, essential oil of spearmint, citric acid, sodium benzoate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil.

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TheraBreath Oral Rinse:
Purified Water, Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), sodium bicarbonate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, essential oil of peppermint, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, tetrasodium EDTA.
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TheraBreath PLUS Oral Rinse:
Purified Water, concentrated Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), zinc gluconate, sodium bicarbonate, tea tree oil, essential oil of spearmint, citric acid, sodium benzoate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil.
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TheraBreath Toothgel:
Sorbitol, hydrated silica, water, aloe barbadensis gel, glycerin, Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), tetrapotassium pyrophosphate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, sodium lauroyl sarcosinate, carrageenan, xylitol, sodium fluoride, essential oil of peppermint, sodium benzoate.
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TheraBreath PowerDrops:
Purified Water, highly concentrated Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), sodium bicarbonate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, essential oil of peppermint, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, tetrasodium EDTA.
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TheraBreath PLUS ToothGel:
Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, water, aloe barbadensis gel, glycerin, oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), tetrapotassium pyrophosphate, tetrasodium pyrophosphate, sodium lauroyl sarcosinate, carrageenan, sodium fluoride, zinc gluconate, ubiquinone (Co-Q10), essential oil of peppermint, natural flavor, sodium benzoate.
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TheraBreath Spray:
Purified Water, concentrated Oxyd-8 (proprietary stabilized Oxychlor compounds), sodium bicarbonate, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil, essential oil of peppermint, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, tetrasodium EDTA.
Click Here to Order. More product ingredient lists to appear so

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