Posts Tagged ‘fluoride’

Keeping Up with Oral Health as You Age

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

oral health as you age

May is National Older Americans Month. Despite the belief that many seniors lose their natural teeth as they age, about 75 percent of people 65 and older have retained all or some of their natural teeth.

With that being said, there’s no doubt that older adults face oral health problems. Sure, one might think that he or she need not be concerned about cavities anymore. But, just like with younger people, tooth decay can cause pain and discomfort as well as wear down the gums. In fact, cavities can occur more frequently in older adults for several reasons. Firstly, seniors may not have been exposed to a fluoridated water system as children or used toothpaste that contains fluoride in the past.

As gum tissue begins to recede in older adults, cavities become more prevalent, since plaque has more space to harbor between the teeth and gums. Also, dry mouth, a result of the natural aging process and certain medications, can lead to more tooth decay. Perhaps most relevantly, older adults are also more likely to have decay around older fillings.

“I wish all fillings and dental work would last forever, but dental work requires maintenance,” Dr. Bruce Terry, a member of the Pennsylvania Dental Association, told the Digital Journal. “Everyone should be seen by their dentist regularly to see if there are any broken teeth or fillings. The health of the gum tissues can also be an early sign of several systemic diseases like diabetes.”

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The Science of Fluoride

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

Fluoride refers to a derivative or reduced form of the element fluorine. Fluorine exists in the earth’s crust, rocks, clay and coal. Plants, air, fresh water and ocean water containfluorine. In the United States, bodies of water have fluorine ranges from 0.1 to 12 parts per (ppm). Public health officials have added fluoride to municipal water supplies since the 1940s.

Many researchers promote the benefits of fluoride, especially in children’s formative years, for the development of strong bones and teeth. On the other end of the scale, excessive fluorine intake may cause dental fluorosis, which is pitted teeth and decay. “If it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles (1, 2, 9).”

Many studies point to the effectiveness of fluoride for maintaining healthy bone strength and teeth. Often, water fluoridation receives credit as the single most important factor, accounting for the 40 to 70 percent reduction in tooth decay among Americans (1, 2).

The History of Fluorine

Fluorine in mining. Fluorite or fluorspar contains fluoride in its natural form. Generally, fluoride compounds derive from fluorspar. Structurally, fluorine has the most stable structure of all the chemical compounds. German miners used fluorspar as a flux or solvent in ore smelting mining. The compound enables miners to use less heat to melt the ore.

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Tooth Enamel Erosion and Prevention

Friday, January 13th, 2012

The strongest and hardest tissue in the human body is tooth enamel. Two percent of enamel is comprised of organic material—protein, lipids and citrate. The other 98 percent consist of water and the minerals calcium hydroxylapatite and calcium fluorapatite (1). Enamel completely envelops other components of the tooth structure, including the dentin, cementum and dental pulp. Enamel protects teeth against the daily wear of biting and chewing. It enables the teeth to withstand hot and cold temperatures, acid and other chemicals which have an erosive effect on teeth. (1, 2, 3).

Tooth enamel ranges in thickness from 2.5 to 3.0 millimeters. It appears white, but actually has a semi-translucent color. The enamel receives it white appearance from the dentin underneath. Coffee, tea, wine, and cigarette smoking discolors are some of the main reasons for discolored tooth enamel (3).

Causes of Tooth Enamel Erosion

Enamel has a high mineral content, which makes it vulnerable to “demineralization” from ingested foods, which contain starch and sugar.

Sugar

Candy, soft drink, fruit juices, and other sweets leave a large amount of sugar coatings on the oral cavity. Sugar may constitute the single largest contributor to enamel erosion. Bacteria flourish on sugar and generate lactic acid, which eats into the enamel.

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Spring Is Here: New Products, New Stores, New Studies!

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

First of all, we’re proud to announce the following:

An article in the UK’s Daily Mail last week about bad breath entitled “How Mouthwash Can Give You Bad Breath and Stain Your Teeth” mentioned many of the studies I’ve been telling you about over the years including the study from the Australian Dental Society linking alcohol in mouthwash to oral cancer.

What was surprising in this article is that they finally corroborated what I’ve been saying about the dangers of Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (the detergent everyone uses in toothpaste — except TheraBreath). Specifically, it says:

“Alcohol based mouthwash has also been linked to an increase risk in oral cancer. Scientists in a study published in The Dental Journal of Australia in 2009 reported that the alcohol in mouthwash allowed cancer causing substances to permeate the lining of the mouth more easily. Some ingredients in toothpaste such as the foaming agent sodium lauryl sulfate can interact with the fluoride in mouthwash and deactivate it so that it loses its effect.”

So as you can see, it literally washes away tons of good stuff, including the fluoride if you’ve previously rinsed with a fluoride mouthwash!

I knew from day 1, that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate was bad news, but the good news is that TheraBreath Toothpaste is and always has been Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and alcohol free! So make sure to visit one of the NEW stores listed above (or click here to find more stores near you), and if you don’t find TheraBreath products on the shelf at any of the stores above, please do me a favor and go talk to the store manager and ask them why not!

To celebrate the new retailers, new products at our current retailers, and the fact that TheraBreath toothpaste does everything we promise it will do, here are some coupons that you can use at any of these stores.

Yours in good oral health,

Harold Katz, DDS

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EPA Calls for Reduction in Fluoride in Drinking Water

Monday, March 7th, 2011

For decades, fluoride has been added to drinking water helping to prevent cavities and fight halitosis and tooth decay in the United States. Recently the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have officially stated that only the minimum requirements of fluoride should be added to drinking water, reducing the current amount.

Along with our water supply, fluoride is found in many oral care products. According to the EPA, fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay by slowing the loss of tooth enamel. Just a small amount between 0.7 and 1.2 milligrams is effective. The EPA and HHS are now suggesting the acceptable level of fluoride in drinking water should be at the minimum of 0.7 milligrams per liter.

The reason for this change is the increasing amount of fluoride that is available through dental cleanings, oral care products such as toothpaste, and tap water.

One of the results of tooth decay is bad breath. When halitosis is prevalent, fluoride in drinking water may do little to help with curing bad breath. While it is important to be hydrated to avoid dry mouth, maintaining a healthy oral care routine is very important. TheraBreath products are guaranteed to stop bad breath. After all, if just drinking water eliminated bad breath and cavities, dentists would be out of business!

Also consider trying an oral care probiotic that can help your body’s ability to resist cavities, sore throats, ear infections, tonsil stones, bad breath and more.

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