Posts Tagged ‘flossing’

Which Preventable Action Leads to Bad Breath?

Monday, September 12th, 2011

As we often talk about, there are numerous causes of bad breath that may not be preventable, but are treatable with TheraBreath products. Just to list a few, these treatable causes include tonsil stones,
odorous foods, dry mouth, postnasal drip
and bad oral hygiene.

Of the preventable bad breath issues, which causes a great deal of bad breath and can be stopped? A group of dental researchers from Kuwait’s College of Health Sciences wanted to find out exactly that answer. This group surveyed more than 1,500 people and of that group, 23% admitted to having some form of bad breath. As this was self-disclosure, the actual number of those inflicted with halitosis might have been  higher, don’t forget that some people that have halitosis don’t even know they do!

What causes these people to have halitosis? Some factors included smoking, use of a toothbrush less than once a day (this group was more than two and half times more likely to have bad breath), smoking, chronic  sinusitis, gastric problems and not flossing.

While there are many factors that can cause foul breath, many of them are preventable. It’s always wise to brush, floss and rinse at least twice a day – using TheraBreath products will help to keep your breath fresh all day.

No Comments Yet »

Why I love to floss…

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

Most people don’t floss very often. They say they do, but they really don’t. Do you? Every day? Before bedtime and before breakfast?

I bet most of you will say no. I’ll be honest – I work for Dr Katz and there are STILL times I skip flossing. But when I do finally get around to it, man is it satisfying. Your teeth feel clean, your gums feel good, and you can actually see all that junk your are scrapping out from in between your teeth.

Have you ever smelled your floss when you were done? Ohmygod… Nasty.

1 Comment »

Gum disease a silent epidemic for seniors

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

“Savvy Senior” tells us about gum disease — the current statistics, the causes and effects, and the simple preventive measures we can take. Gum disease is more common — and more dangerous than you think. Periotherapy and good oral hygiene are the best weapons against gum disease.

Gum disease — silent but deadly.

October 16, 2007

Dear Savvy Senior: I recently read that gum disease can cause all different types of deadly health conditions. As a senior who brushes regularly and flosses occasionally, what can you tell me about this? — Hate to Floss

Dear Floss: By taking better care of your mouth (which includes daily flossing), you could actually add years to your life! Here’s what you should know.

Dental Services If you don’t have dental insurance or can’t afford professional dental care, some communities and clinics offer discounted or free services to seniors in need, and most dental schools offer low-cost checkups and cleanings. Contact your state dental association (see www.ada.org/ada/organizations ) or your Area Agency on Aging (call (800) 677-1116 to get your local number) to find out what may be available in your area. Also check out the Bureau of Primary Health Care ( www.ask.hrsa.gov/pc ; (888) 275-4772) and the National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped ( www.nfdh.org — click on “Donated Dental Services” or call (888) 471-6334).

Gum disease

Bleeding GumsAlso known as periodontal disease, gum disease is a silent epidemic in this country. Currently, 80 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of gum disease – which ranges from simple gum inflammation (called gingivitis), to serious a disease (called periodontitis) that can infect the gums, bone and other tissue surrounding the teeth.

Consequences

If you have gum disease, you have greatly increased your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. How? Because the bacteria-rich plaque that builds up on your teeth (that’s what causes gum disease) releases toxins into your bloodstream that can inflame your arteries and cause small blood clots. But that’s not all. There are other health problems linked to gum disease such as pancreatic cancer, respiratory diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach ulcers and even pregnancy complications.

Are you at risk?

Most people develop gum disease because they simply don’t keep their mouths clean. But there are other factors that can increase your risk, including:
• Smoking: Need another reason to quit? Smoking is the number one risk factor for gum disease.
• Age: Older people have a greater risk of periodontal disease because they have more wear and tear on their gums.
• Genetics: If you have a family history of gum disease your risk goes up.
• Medications: Some medications (antihistamines, antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, some heart medicines and many others) can cause dry mouth, and the lack of saliva contributes to gum disease. If you have dry mouth, talk to your doctor or dentist.
• Deficient diet: A diet lacking proper amounts of calcium and vitamin C can contribute to gum disease too.
• Hormonal changes: Changes that occur during pregnancy, menopause or even menstruation can make gums more susceptible for women.
• Diabetes: People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing gum disease. It also makes blood glucose levels harder to control.

Savvy Tip: Check your risk for gum disease at www.perio.org — click on “Assess Your Gum Disease Risk.”

Simple solutions

It only takes about five minutes a day to keep your gums healthy. Here are some simple and familiar ways you can take the bite out of gum disease:
Floss guy• Brush: At least twice a day brush your teeth using fluoride toothpaste and learn how to brush properly. See www.webmd.com/oral-health for a refresher course on brushing and flossing. Also use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. Hard or stiff bristles are more likely to injure your gums. And be sure to replace your brush every three months or so. (Tip: Power toothbrushes with rotating or vibrating bristles have shown to be more effective at removing plaque than manual brushes. See www.oralb.com for oral care products.)
• Floss: Do it at least once a day either before or after you brush. The sequence doesn’t matter as long as you do a thorough job. Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line and is absolutely necessary.• Get checkups: See your dentist every six months for regular cleanings and oral exams.

Source: (http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com)

2 Comments »

Tooth loss may predict later-life dementia: study

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Megan Rauscher explains why the loss of your teeth may predict the loss of your sanity later in life. Lack of proper gum care causes or aggravates unhealthy gums, weakening of teeth, and eventual loss of teeth. Dr. Harold Katz, of course, has a solution. Periotherapy keeps gums healthy and teeth intact.

TheraBreath

Don’t lose your teeth, and your mind

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – To keep dementia at bay, take care of your teeth. That seems to be the message of a new study in which researchers found a possible link between tooth loss or having very few teeth — one to nine, to be exact — and the development of dementia later in life.

The research team analyzed dental records and brain function test results accumulated over 12 years for 144 people enrolled in the Nun Study – a long-term study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease among Catholic sisters of the School Sisters of Notre Dame. The participants ranged in age from 75 to 98 years.

Among subjects free of dementia at the first cognitive exam, those with no teeth or fewer than nine teeth had a greater than 2-fold increased risk of becoming demented later in life compared with those who had 10 or more teeth, the researchers found.

Roughly one third of subjects with fewer than nine teeth, or no teeth, had dementia at the first cognitive exam.

Dr. Pamela Sparks Stein of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and associates report their findings in The Journal of the American Dental Association.

A number of prior studies have shown that people who suffer from dementia are more likely than their cognitively intact counterparts to have poor oral health, largely due to neglect of oral hygiene.

The current study is one of only a few that asked: Does poor health contribute to the development of dementia? These results suggest it may, although the Kentucky team cautions that it is not clear from the study whether the association is “causal or casual.”

“Common underlying conditions may simultaneously contribute to both tooth loss and dementia,” Stein noted in comments to Reuters Health. In addition to gum disease, early-life nutritional deficiencies, infections or chronic diseases that may result simultaneously in tooth loss and damage to the brain, she explained.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Dental Association, October 2007.

No Comments Yet »

Am I being rude if choose to brush and floss my teeth in the office bathroom?

Thursday, October 11th, 2007

Peter Post of The Boston Globe addresses a reader question about ethics and oral hygiene in the workplace. Is it offensive to brush and floss in a common office bathroom? Let’s see what he has to say.

Q: I like to brush and floss my teeth after lunch. I do this in the office bathroom without any flourish. I stand to the side and don’t engage in conversation or use the sink too loudly. However, I still wonder if I’m being rude, even if I brush and floss following the rules of discretion.

S. J., Newton

A: I applaud your behavior. Not only are you appropriately addressing a personal grooming issue that we should all work on – keeping your breath fresh and your teeth clean – you’re also doing your brushing in the right place. Instead of thinking of yourself as rude, think of yourself as a role model others in your office would do well to emulate.

Bad breath can be a real relationship killer, both in your personal and your professional life. As soon as someone notices bad breath in another person, the focus goes to that person’s bad breath rather than on what he or she has to say. By brushing your teeth after lunch, you’re giving yourself a leg up on all your colleagues who don’t do anything to keep their breath fresh. Rest assured: You are doing the right thing and setting an excellent example.

For fresh breath all throughout your work day, I recommend the Therabreath travel kit. Great for carrying around.

No Comments Yet »