Posts Tagged ‘enamel erosion’

Tooth Enamel Erosion and Prevention

Friday, January 13th, 2012

The strongest and hardest tissue in the human body is tooth enamel. Two percent of enamel is comprised of organic material—protein, lipids and citrate. The other 98 percent consist of water and the minerals calcium hydroxylapatite and calcium fluorapatite (1). Enamel completely envelops other components of the tooth structure, including the dentin, cementum and dental pulp. Enamel protects teeth against the daily wear of biting and chewing. It enables the teeth to withstand hot and cold temperatures, acid and other chemicals which have an erosive effect on teeth. (1, 2, 3).

Tooth enamel ranges in thickness from 2.5 to 3.0 millimeters. It appears white, but actually has a semi-translucent color. The enamel receives it white appearance from the dentin underneath. Coffee, tea, wine, and cigarette smoking discolors are some of the main reasons for discolored tooth enamel (3).

Causes of Tooth Enamel Erosion

Enamel has a high mineral content, which makes it vulnerable to “demineralization” from ingested foods, which contain starch and sugar.

Sugar

Candy, soft drink, fruit juices, and other sweets leave a large amount of sugar coatings on the oral cavity. Sugar may constitute the single largest contributor to enamel erosion. Bacteria flourish on sugar and generate lactic acid, which eats into the enamel.

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Random Dental Health Facts

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

bad breath

Babies are not born with caries-forming bacteria.  They only get it directly if someone blows on food before feeding it to the baby, or if someone kisses the baby and germs get in the mouth.

One of the main sweetening agents in toothpaste, Saccharine Sodium, is actually 500 times sweeter than sugar!  This is not in TheraBreath’s toothpaste.

If you have a cold, sore throat, or some type of infection, make sure to replace your toothbrush.  Bacteria can live on them and proliferate, possibly leading to reinfection.

Try to keep your toothbrush at least 6 feet away from where you brush.  Airborne bacteria from a flush can travel up to 6 feet. 

The year the most popular carbonated drink was launched, there was a massive surge of patients with tooth decay.

Children below 5 years of age should be given non-fluoridated toothpastes, because it can be harmful to swallow too much fluoride. 

Replacing the cap on a toothpaste tube after brushing your teeth allegedly helps bacteria proliferate.

Brushing your teeth too fast or hard can contribute to the problem of enamel erosion, which causes teeth sensitivity, tooth decay, and other oral health problems.

Source: dentalhealthsite.com

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Sports Drinks May Erode Tooth Enamel

Monday, April 27th, 2009

Research has shown that the citric acid in sports drinks can damage teeth.

Researchers at the New York University College of Denstistry used cow teeth to come to this conclusion. They cut the teeth in half and put them in the top-selling sports drinks, and after they soaked up to 90 minutes (similar to a human sipping on drinks throughout the day), they found that the enamel of the teeth was partially eaten away. If the enamel coating is weakened, the sports drinks are more likely to leak into the bonelike material underneath the enamel, which causes teeth to soften and weaken. This condition is called erosive tooth wear, and it can lead to severe tooth damage or the loss of teeth if it is not treated.

Surprisingly enough, Dr. Mark Wolff, chairman of cariology and comprehensive care at the NYU College of Dentistry, said brushing immediately after drinking a sports beverage is likely to cause more damage than waiting a bit. This is because the softened tooth enamel is more vulnerable to the toothpaste’s abrasiveness.

Experts recommend that people should consume sports beverages in moderation, and wait at least 30 minutes before brushing their teeth, so the softened enamel has time to re-harden. It may also be a good idea for someone who consumes a lot of sports drinks to find an acid-neutralizing, re-mineralizing toothpaste to help re-harden soft tooth enamel.

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