Posts Tagged ‘Dog Breath’

Dog Dental Health

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

A dog’s oral health is a very important part of its overall health.  Dogs usually do not get cavities, but food and bacteria can cause plague problems.  Plague can form tartar along the gumlines, and if that is left untreated, periodontal disease can form causing loose teeth, bone loss, infections, and abscesses.  The bacteria that build along the gumline can enter between the gums and the teeth if pockets are created.  If this happens, the bacteria can enter the bloodstream, which could even infect a dog’s liver, kidneys, and heart valves. 

Regular good oral hygiene is key to preventing gum disease and thus, maintaining good oral health.  A pet owner should examine the dog’s mouth and examine it for periodontal disease symptoms like bad breath (halitosis), abnormal gums (bleeding gums, swollen gums, discolored gums, or painful gums), or tartar.  A dog’s teeth should regularly be brushed.

Brushing teeth can get rid of plague but not tartar, and a veterinarian is needed in order to remove tartar.  A routine veterinarian examination includes taking x-rays, cleaning the teeth and gums, and flushing the dog’s mouth with an antibacterial solution. 

Regular veterinarian visits are an intregral part of preventive care and identifying problems before they become severe.  Also, if necessary, dogs can have procedures also available to people: root canals, crowns, braces, etc.

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Dog Breath Remedy

Monday, July 6th, 2009

Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another.  It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth.  Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

Dog Breath Causes

The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague.  There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

Diagnosing Dog Breath

One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath.  A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem.  Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet.  Here are some symptoms:

1.  Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
2.  Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
3.  Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

Dog Breath Cure

Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath.  If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning.  If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating.  If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

Prevent Dog Breath

Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath.  Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention.  Here are some good things to do:

1.  Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
2.  Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
3.  Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
4.  Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday.  Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
5.  Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
6.  Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
7.  Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it.  Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

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Dogs and Cats Have Bad Breath: Oral Products for Pets

Monday, June 1st, 2009

Dog Breath

Does your dog or cat have persistent bad breath? It could mean that your best friend may have a serious problem. Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis, gingivitis or gum disease) is the #1 disease in dogs and cats and bad breath is one sign that your pet may be suffering. Now, there is a way to attack it naturally and effectively.

Dr. Katz for Pets products bring to you and your pet 21st Century science, which fights odors generated by sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria. The basis of these revolutionary home treatments has been proven thousands of times through the use of oxygenating compounds.

Free Dr. Katz for Pets Trial and Printable Guide

Oral Health for Dogs

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Bad Breath in Cats and Dogs

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009

Bad Breath in Dogs Can Mean Serious Health Complications

Imagine your beloved pet coming up to you to cuddle like it does every day, but lately you’ve been noticing your pet has bad breath that is getting worse and worse.  With our furry friends, there could be multiple causes for this bad breath.  These include teeth problems, kidney dysfunction, diabetes, and foreign bodies in the mouth.

Dental disease is the most common, and dirty teeth is one of the main things that the vet will be looking for when looking in your pet’s mouth.  Other things to be checked out are the pet’s hydration status, and the color of its gums.  If the pet’s teeth are covered in chunks of calculus, the solution requires much more than brushing.  Nowadays, pet owners are more aware that their pet’s teeth need to be scaled and polished just as a human’s would.

Oral foreign bodies can cause infections, like a bone embedded in the roof of a dog’s mouth.  Metabolic disorders can occur when the pet’s kidneys are not working properly; thus, toxins in the blood can cause ulcerations in the mouth that cause bad breath. Remember that any mouth ulcerations or inflamed gums can give your pet bad breath, including viral diseases in cats. Diabetes can give a your pet’s breath a certain “ketotic” odor that your vet should recognize.

All in all, brushing and buying tartar control treats for Fido may not always be enough, so remember the possibilities!

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Bad Breath in Dogs

Monday, October 15th, 2007

Shiela Wolf writes about Dog Breath in Buzzle.com. The expression “dog breath” was coined for a reason — because most dogs have bad breath! The good news is Dr. Katz has a solution for this problem – Dr. Katz Oral Solution for Dogs.

Fido may be your best friend, but when he slobbers your face with his kisses, do you notice his horrible doggie breath and pull away? It might be a sign of something much more serious than just malodor. It might even be life-threatening.

 

 

Veterinarians have been much more aware of the connection between periodontal diseases (chronic gum infections) and heart problems than most medical doctors, and seem to have been talking about it far longer. It has just been since the Surgeon General published his report, “Oral Health in America” in May 2000, that the medical profession began to take notice. Infections in your pet’s mouth can travel into their circulatory system, just like in humans, and set up infections in other organs of their bodies. That can cause serious whole-body problems. Having a gum infection can mean your pet is at higher risk for heart attacks, stroke, diabetic complications, respiratory problems, and many other life-threatening illnesses. It is no different from the threat chronic infections pose for us humans. For more info on gum disease, its transmission, and its relationship to general health visit www.mamagums.com.

You should regularly check your pet for:
• Bad, Stale Breath
• Missing, loose, or broken teeth
• Bleeding or swollen gums – (check especially along the gum line)
• Persistent yellowish or brown teeth which may be accumulations of plaque and tartar
• Any unusual growths
• Receding gums
• Any signs of pus or drainage
If your pet is avoiding his toys or bones, not eating well, or won’t drink water that is too cold, you can suspect a problem in his mouth.

Here are ways to examine your pet for mouth problems:
• Take an intimate moment with your beloved animal. Make sure you won’t be disturbed by noise or distractions. Be gentle and take your time.
• To look at the left side molars: Place index finger of left hand on top of muzzle and place left thumb below bottom jaw to prevent your pet from opening their jaw.
• Lift their lips open with right index finger and thumb.
• Visually examine the gum area around the back molars for plaque, tartar, inflammation, and receding gums.
• To check for loose teeth, gently press each tooth (if your pet allows it) If he has bad breath, his gums may be red and inflamed. Be very gentle.
• To check the front teeth, separate upper and lower lips with thumbs & index finger, looking for redness (inflammation or infections) at the gum area at the base of the teeth.
• Repeat same steps on the other side.
• Report areas of tenderness to his Vet.

Don’t let your dog (or kitty) suffer unnecessarily. Although bad breath may not be the same social stigma that it is for us, they still could fall prey to the risks of overall health problems and live a shorter life. Mouth bacteria are transmissible from person to person, and even from Fido to you. Be sure you and your pet are both healthy so you don’t pass your germs to each other.

Click on this link for helpful products. http://www.therabreath.com/art_dogs.asp?affid=3338

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