Posts Tagged ‘Dog Breath’

Pets with Bad Breath

Monday, November 29th, 2010

According to the 2009/2010 National Pet Owners Survey, 62% of all U.S. households own a pet. That is about 71.4 million homes. The majority of these pets are dogs, closely followed by cats.

But these four-legged creatures are often much more than just a pet, they are truly members of the household and family. Many of us care for these pets as if they are our own children.  We take them to the vet and groomers regularly, and spend hundreds of dollars a year on pet care.

While we give them treats (such as raw-hides) to chew on, our pets may still have dental problems and bad breath. Did you know that periodontal disease is the #1 disease in dogs and cats? Bad breath is one major sign that your pet may be suffering from this. So rather than spend large amounts of money on non-anesthetic cleanings or risk the more evasive anesthetic cleanings on your pet, try treating it naturally and effectively with Dr. Katz for Dogs + Cats Oral Solution. (more…)

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Does Your Dog Have Bad Breath? Free Dental Check-ups for Dogs in the UK

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010

In the United Kingdom, March 2010 is the launch of “Oral Care Month“.  Vets are teaming up with a dog food company to give free dental checks for canines.  The veterinary services at Bristol University said that the purpose of these free exams was to put emphasis on the problem of gum disease in dogs.   In adult dogs, gum infections are the most common problem, and it affects 80% of dogs over age three.  That’s only one out of five dogs that is gum disease free!  Unfortunately, only TWO PERCENT of owners employ the use of a regular oral maintenance routine for their pets.

Hopefully, Oral Care Month helps educate pet owners on how important it is to maintain regular dental care, which includes brushing daily and offering a dog chews.  Both of these help to diminish the amount of plaque and tartar buildup in the oral cavity.  Chews can reduce plaque buildup by up to 60%, and tartar buildup as much as 80%.  Also, people will be learning what gum disease symptoms to look for in their pets, like bad breath, picky eating, and so on.  Sometimes these symptoms can signify a health condition, and should not be accepted as ‘normal’.

It is said that dogs need their dental health attended to just like humans.  When a dog hits age three, 80% have gum disease, which is caused by excessive tartar and plaque.  So, if you have a dog and live in the UK, this is the month to take advantage of a free checkup!

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Brushing a Dog’s (or Cat’s) Teeth

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

brush dog's teeth

Does your dog have bad breath? Well, maybe you are not employing the use of proper oral hygiene. After all, us humans need to maintain a level of oral care so that we don’t have halitosis. Also, just like people, dogs and cats can get gum disease–and if a dog or cat’s gums are infected and abscessed, bacteria can enter the bloodstream, causing liver, kidney, and even heart malfunctions. So, what’s a good way to brush your best friend’s teeth?

Here are some tips for brushing your pet’s teeth:

#1 Start off slowly. Make sure to use a toothpaste formula that is specifically made for animals, since human toothpaste can give stomach upsets to animals. Have your pet lick the paste off of your finger, and you might need to try a few different flavors to find one that your pet likes.

#2 Once you can get toothpaste into the animal’s mouth, use a slight amount on your finger and run it across the dog or cat’s teeth. This might even take several days to get your pet to do this agreeably. Once your pet is fine with you doing this to its teeth, use a toothbrush (made for pets) and make small circles on the gum line. Don’t brush too hard!

#3 Be sure to cheer on your pet and express approval during this process. Afterward, you could also give your pet a treat, playtime, a walk, etc., so it will think of brushing as a positive moment.

#4 In order to practice proper oral hygiene with your pet, try to brush your pet’s teeth every day.

Here are some warning signs to look for in your pet’s mouth:

  1. Yellow or brown tartar, especially where the teeth and gums meet
  2. Red, swollen, bleeding, inflamed, tender, and/or receding gums
  3. Chronic halitosis
  4. Teeth that are chipped/broken
  5. Tooth resorption (especially common in cats)- a very painful condition in which the tooth dissolves
  6. A change in the animal’s diet, chewing habits and appetite can signify depression (along with pawing at the face/mouth).

Also, don’t forget to try this oral rinse for dogs and cats that helps prevent plaque and tartar buildup.  Be sure to practice good oral hygiene with your pet, so that the both of you can have great smiles!

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Does Your Dog Have Bad Breath?

Friday, February 12th, 2010

bad breath in dogs

While most people just accept the fact that their dog’s breath smells like…well, dog breath…what they don’t realize is that odor might signify serious health risks with the potential to damage not only your pooches’ teeth and gums but also its internal organs.  To address the significance of oral health care for pets, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and several other veterinary groups have joined to declare February as National Pet Dental Health Month.

Bacteriologist and fresh breath guru, Dr. Harold Katz, is not only an expert on fresh breath for humans, he is also THE expert on fresh breath for man’s best friend. Dr. Katz is available to come in-studio with his electronic breath testing device, the Halimeter, and measure some pups’ breath on air, giving pet parents sensible tips on how to prevent doggie gum disease and get rid of bad breath in dogs for good!

Katz has been a featured guest on tons of local and national TV shows across the country.  Click here to view his most recent interview on Fox & Friends, and to access his full demo reel: http://www.viddler.com/explore/drkatz/videos/123/.

Thanks for your consideration – let me know what you think!

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Dog Breath Remedy

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Most of us are used to the thought of dogs having bad breath, but that may not be a good thing. The dog could have serious health issues causing chronic halitosis. Bad breath is caused by the same anaerobic bacteria that causes this malodor in humans, and these bacteria generally give off a rotten egg smell, since a sulfur substance is excreted. True, dogs may eat and chew on things like rotten bones, and so on, but chronic bad breath can mean serious complications like periodontal disease. It’s a good idea to bring your dog to the vet to try and get a diagnosis. The vet will make some recommendations on what can remedy this condition, based on what causes it. Probiotics may even be helpful in remedying the halitosis. TheraBreath sells a formula specially designed for cats and dogs: just click here for our dog breath remedy. This way, you can make sure your dog kisses from Fido aren’t smelly!

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