Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Gum Disease Almost 100 Percent Preventable

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

gingivitisDo you wear sunscreen on blistering hot days? Do you buckle your seat belt when going on a road trip? Like these measures, taking care of your gums and teeth marks the benefits of preventative care. Think ahead of time. Not only will staying on top of your gum health ward off unwanted accidents, it might also keep money in the bank later on.

The early stage of gum disease, called gingivitis, is the inflammation of your gums. Red tissue, receding gum lines and bleeding gums after brushing are all telltale signs of gingivitis. This occurs when plaque is allowed to accumulate in the pockets between where your teeth meet the gums. Plaque contains bacteria, which produce toxins that slowly eat away at the tissue. Although gums may be irritated at this point, teeth remain firmly planted in their sockets, and no irreversible bone damage has occurred yet.

If left untreated, however, gingivitis may progress to periodontal disease, or advanced-stage gum disease. At this point, the inner layer of the gum and bone begin to pull away from teeth, creating small pockets. The deeper the pockets, the more space bacteria have to grow.

At its nastiest, gum disease can result in the loss of teeth as well as the bones that support the teeth.

Biggest causes of gum diseases:
• Tobacco products: Smoking, chewing and any other use of tobacco has been shown as one of the leading causes of gum disease. The chemicals in tobacco leave harmful bacteria in the mouth, which erodes the gum tissue. When this happens, smoker’s breath might be the least of one’s concerns. Cigarettes, cigars and pipes contribute to gingivitis and periodontitis.

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National Diabetes Month

Monday, November 25th, 2013

550152_84366311November is National Diabetes Month, which helps raise awareness for people who face the day-to-day struggles of the disease. If you’re a diabetic, you likely keep an eye on your diet and nutrition. Diabetics are more at risk for a variety of different conditions, especially dental health problems, including gum diseasedry mouth, tooth decay and oral infections. In fact, people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop gum disease than those with normal glucose function.

During this month, the American Diabetes Association wants to put the ever-growing disease in the national spotlight. At the beginning of November, they asked people to submit a personal image to the association’s Facebook mosaic demonstrating what “A Day in the Life of Diabetes” means to them. If you or anyone you know has diabetes, you already understand how life-changing the condition can be. According to the association, almost 26 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes. Another 79 million Americans have prediabetes, or impaired glucose tolerance, and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

Raising awareness of diabetes
Diabetes is a chronic disease which affects how the body breaks down sugar, or glucose, which is the brain’s main source of fuel. Normally, insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, keeps blood glucose in check. However, those who have diabetes experience insulin resistance, which results in high levels of blood sugar.

There are three main variations of the disease: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Totaling 90 to 95 percent of all new cases worldwide, type 2 is by far the most common form of diabetes.

So, where does the health of your mouth enter the picture? Diabetes can lead to a spectrum of dental issues, with gum disease and dry mouth at the forefront.

Gum disease
Though periodontal disease, or gum disease, is regarded as a complication of diabetes, the connection is a two-way street; diabetics are more prone to gum disease, and in turn, gum disease can influence the development of diabetes.

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Check Out a New Infographic on Periodontal Disease and Cures for Gingivitis

Thursday, April 5th, 2012


Gum disease is much more common than you might think, and it can lead to major health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental

Infographic: Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental.com

It’s not so tough to think about bad breath, ruminate on gum disease or visualize the specialty cures for gingivitis. But can you do it all at once? It might help to have a nice infographic to look at, which is exactly what the folks at 1Dental have made.

The handy chart covers a lot of the bases that we regularly discuss here at TheraBreath. However, if you think it’s only about halitosis and the occasional oral-odor-related faux pas, you’re in for a surprise.

The fact is, gum disease, periodontitis and other serious oral health problems can do much more than foul up your breath. They can also increase your risk for some dire chronic illnesses, making cures for gingivitis more critical than ever.

For starters, the infographic notes that as many as one-half of all Americans have some level of gum disease, while a smaller fraction – between 5 and 10 percent – have serious gingivitis, or even periodontal disease.

As is immediately obvious when you take a peek at the page, these gum diseases come with some nasty baggage:

- People with periodontitis are four times more likely to develop pneumonia, compared to those without the gum condition.

- Fully 95 percent of people with diabetes have periodontal disease!

- Gum disease can contribute to lung infections and chronic pulmonary conditions.

- Mothers-to-be with periodontal disease have a sevenfold greater chance of giving birth prematurely or having an underweight baby.

Check out the infographic for more in that vein, as well as for ways to improve your dental health and avoid gum disease. The risks associated with periodontal disease are some of the very reasons that we’ve been recommending PerioTherapy for years. By fighting bad breath and attending to your gum health today, you may be able to avoid serious risks tomorrow.

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Secrets from Dentists

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

kids bad breath

There are many things that people may not realize regarding oral care and its relationship to overall health.  Dental health is a very important thing and should not be neglected.  Here are certain things that you may not have known about dental care and dentists:

Pay More Attention

  • Just because your mouth may not hurt, does not mean it is healthy. 
  • Your oral health can affect the rest of your body
  • People with HEALTHY gums should go to the dentist twice a year.  Most people do not.  If your gums are NOT healthy, you should go even more. 
  • People tend to brush their front teeth more, and many people have periodontal disease in their back teeth because of this
  • People tend to spend around 2-3 minutes total brushing per day, even though proper oral care requires at least ten minutes of brushing and flossing each day.  Kids tend to spend even less time than adults. 

Bad Breath

  • Chewing gum or mints is not going to cover up the smell from smoking cigarettes.  This is because the smell is deeply ingrained in the mouth and gum tissues.
  • Most dentists won’t tell you if you have halitosis unless you ask.
  • People need to floss since brushing does not go deep into the gums.  If a person brushes and flosses properly, gets regular cleanings, and STILL has bad breath, then he or she should check into diet and health complications.

Children’s Teeth

  • Dentists may secretly blame parents when their kids’ teeth go bad.
  • Cavity-causing bacteria CAN be spread from person-to-person via saliva.  This includes parents to children– if a parent tastes a baby’s food, and puts the same spoon back into the baby’s mouth, the baby is at risk.
  • Children with dental problems, like toothaches, tend to have more problems in school.
  • There’s a significant risk of infection with any kind of mouth piercing if it is not performed in a sterile environment.  Also, tongue piercings tend to chip the front teeth.

Patient Concerns

  • Having metal fillings removed can release more mercury than leaving them in.  Metal fillings are much more durable than tooth-colored fillings.
  • People are exposed to more radiation standing outside for an hour than they are when they have dental X-rays taken.
  • People are getting teeth pulled that don’t need to be just because they can’t afford to fix them.
  • Very few insurance companies cover dental implants, even though they’re better than dentures
  • Teeth that are not aligned correctly can cause migraines
  • Bleeding gums is one of the first signs of diabetes
  • Did you know that teeth get whiter when they dry out?  If you go to the dentist to get your teeth whitened, and your mouth is left open for an hour, the teeth could be two shades whiter from dehydration alone. 
  • Cosmetic dentistry only works in a healthy mouth.  Always treat your gum disease first.
  • When you go to the dentist, check to see if the magazines in the waiting area are up-to-date…this shows if they pay attention to detail.

Here is an interesting quote by dentist Damian Dachowski: “When someone meets you for the first time, the first thing they notice is eyes. Second is teeth, and third is hair. But people spend way more money on their hair than their teeth.”

Source: Reader’s Digest

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Diabetes and Gum Disease

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009

http://www.therabreath.com/productdetail.asp?cat=2&pid=287 A person with diabetes is at a much greater risk for gum / periodontal disease than a person who does not have diabetes.

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