Posts Tagged ‘detergent’

Halitosis Drives People to Extreme Measures

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

If there’s one lesson I’ve learned from being a halitosis professional, it’s that people will try virtually anything to get rid of bad breath. And who can blame them? Oral odor is difficult to get rid of at the best of times, so much so that it’s usually advisable to ditch one’s run-of-the-mill dental products in favor of a specialty breath freshening regimen.

You see, specially formulated, all-natural products can moisten the mouth and oxygenate the palate, thereby neutralizing odors and effectively shoo-ing bacteria out of the oral environment. That’s the open secret of freshening breath: It all boils down to making life hard for your mouth’s microbes.

However, it’s important to do so without synthetic chemicals, irritants, allergens or other harsh substances. These ingredients generally make little or no progress in fighting bacteria; instead, they irritate the tissues in your mouth and parch your palate, making bad breath worse.

Yet these are the types of ingredients many Americans saturate their mouths with every day. And if you think that people won’t go to extremes in the effort to eliminate halitosis, well, buckle up.

Here is a list of some of the bizarrest substances used at one time or another in the fight against oral odor. And before you sneer at them, keep in mind that some of them are probably lurking in your medicine cabinet right now.

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For halitosis, antibacterial agent works just fine without detergent

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

What is necessary in a mouthrinse, toothpaste or specialty breath freshener for getting rid of halitosis? A recent study found that while a common antibacterial and antifungal substance reduced oral odor when combined with a detergent, the latter wasn’t necessary for sweetening breath.

Research published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology noted that triclosan, an agent that can eliminate fungal and bacterial populations, dramatically reduced the scent of bad breath when combined with alcohol or sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS).

However, both of these additives need not be included in an effective mouthwash, the team wrote. Experiments conducted by the authors “support the contention that triclosan exhibits an anti-[volatile sulfur compound] effect per se,” meaning that SLS is not a requirement in a breath freshener.

On the contrary, the team noted that they could not conduct a test on the halitosis-fighting properties of SLS alone because the substance “may cause damage to oral tissues” in solutions stronger than those found in common toothpastes.

What is SLS? A surfactant, or foaming agent, as well as a detergent in stronger doses. Rather than putting what amounts to soap in your mouth and risking getting canker sores, consider using a specialty tongue scraper or SLS-free mouth rinse.

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