Posts Tagged ‘dental plaque’

Link Shown Between Oral Bacteria and Joint Infection

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

STKT-PER-286Doctors and scientists have long been concerned about a link between oral bacteria and joint health. In 2012, researchers studied a small group of participants who suffered from periodontal disease and joint disease, some of whom had joint replacements. Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine questioned the DNA of bacteria from the lubricant fluid in hip and knee joints, which is called synovial fluid. Then, the dental plaque of the patients with periodontal disease was also examined.

Case Western study
In the study “Identification of Oral Bacterial DNA in Synovial Fluid of Patients with Arthritis with Native and Failed Prosthetic Joints,” researchers examined 36 participants, five of whom had a direct link between the DNA of his or her dental plaque and the bacteria in the joints. Eleven of the participants had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 25 were diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) during the time of the study. Of these participants, eight with OA and one with RA had failed prosthetics. Bacterial DNA was detected in five patients with failed prosthetic or native joints, and two of those individuals were identified to have gum disease and identical bacterial clones between the joint and mouth. This study showed a possible link between gum disease and failed joints; however, the findings were not substantial enough to make definitive claims.

The dental plaque that was tracked during the study is the cause of inflammation in the mouth, which, once in the bloodstream, can cause kidney and heart disease, cancer or even premature births or fetal deaths.

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Don’t Get Stressed Out, Your Oral Hygiene will Thank You

Friday, September 13th, 2013

iStock_000008179465MediumOral hygiene is important, but experts say you shouldn’t stress about it! Going to the dentist can cause anxiety and stress for many people, but it’s still incredibly important to get a cleaning twice a year. At the same rate, research has shown the correlation between oral hygiene and good heart health. So whether you’re stressing out at the office, or get anxious just thinking about going to the dentist, take a deep breath and realize it could be affecting both the wellbeing of your mouth and your entire body.

Chill out in the chair
No one likes going to the doctor or dentist, but you’ll probably feel much better after you leave. Most people have negative thoughts toward the industry; however, technological advancements are making the experience much more enjoyable. From personal televisions at every chair to procedures that cause less pain, cavity treatments aren’t a big, bad scary thing anymore. However, preventing them can ease even more anxiety.

By regularly going to the dentist, you can decrease your chances of needing cavity treatments altogether because the hygienist will scrape away built up plaque and tartar that cause tooth decay and gum disease. Additionally, these trips can keep your heart in better condition.

“The relationship between oral health and systemic health is becoming a growing concern of the general public,” Dentist Jack Elder said. “But dentistry can make a major contribution if the right dentist is chosen.”

Research has found gum disease to show the biggest link to heart disease compared with other oral health ailments. Otherwise called periodontal disease, inflammation of the gums is caused by the overall unhealthiness of the mouth. It all depends on what you eat, your daily oral hygiene routine and the regularity that you visit the dentist.

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Milk can Help Fight Cavities

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

1155002_70100397Did your mom ever tell you to drink a glass of milk each day? She was right. Research conducted at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry found that drinking milk after sugary meals, like cereal, can reduce dental plaque buildup and prevent the erosion of tooth enamel. And no, we don’t mean the sugary milk that’s left at the bottom of the bowl.

The research, published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, was conducted on 20 adults who ate 20 grams of dry Froot Loops cereal. After consuming the product, each individual was asked to drink a different beverage: whole milk, 100 percent apple juice or tap water. Those who drank the apple juice didn’t notice a change in their pH levels, while the individuals who drank water saw their pH levels rise from 5.75 to 6.02 in 30 minutes. Those who drink milk had their pH level rise from 5.75 to 6.48 in the same time period.

“Our study results show that only milk was able to reduce acidity of dental plaque resulting from consuming sugary Froot Loops,”  Shilpa Naval, a fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said. “We believe that milk helped mitigate the damaging effect of fermentable carbohydrate and overcome the previously lowered plaque pH.”

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Top Causes of Tooth Sensitivity

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

lady-mouth-hurtsIs it painful when you drink really cold beverages or eat ice cream? Tooth sensitivity can arise for a number of reasons, and it can make it difficult to enjoy some of your favorite foods and drinks. From using harsh whitening treatments to having a high amount of dental plaque on the teeth, your tooth sensitivity may not be entirely treatable, but you can take measures to ease the pain. Here are a few of the top reasons why you may have sensitive teeth:

Teeth whitening
If you’ve used at-home teeth whitening products, this could be a major contributor to your sensitive teeth. Are those pearly whites worth the pain? Teeth whiteners penetrate into the tooth to increase blood flow and pressure, which can irritate the nerve ending. Also, tooth whiteners are working to strip away the layer of enamel that is stained. When your tooth has less enamel, your tooth becomes more sensitive.

However, you don’t have to forget about white teeth forever! TheraBreath Dental Professional Whitening Kit promotes a whiter smile without the negative side effects. The combination of dental-office-strength peroxide gel and post-whitening remineralization gel gets the teeth beautiful, shiny and protects against nerve pain. While you might notice some slight sensitivity as well as gum discoloration right after applying, this will go away 24 hours after using it. This product is one of the safest available on the market.

Toothpaste
Additionally, if your toothpaste contains whitener, it can be causing you sensitivity just like traditional teeth whiteners. If you take a look at the paste you are using, it’s likely that it has a gritty texture. While this works to literally scrub away stains, it is also abrasive to enamel. Make sure to stick to toothpaste with natural ingredients, which won’t increase your sensitivity.

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What’s the Deal with Hydrogen Peroxide?

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

184540_6193Hydrogen peroxide is one of those items that almost everyone has in their medicine cabinet, and it can actually be a great solution for many things. Whether you have a cut on your hand, need to whiten your clothes or want to wipe down mirrors without streaks, hydrogen peroxide can get the job done. It also has many benefits for your mouth, and it is widely, safely and effectively used in dental practices today. Most notably, the solution is used as a home remedy for teeth whitening.

A recent article published in Registered Dental Hygienist reported that the product can be used to treat periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease. In 1913, dentists started using hydrogen peroxide to decrease the amount of dental plaque on teeth and to control gum disease, and it can still be used today. Hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen, which is a powerful antimicrobial action. If hydrogen peroxide can be held in place along the gum line and within the periodontal pockets that appear in those with gum disease, it can penetrate the slime matrix that protects biofilm and then removes bacterial cell walls; however, it needs as least 10 minutes to do so.

The study followed four patients who were suffering from different stages of periodontal disease, and each were given doses of hydrogen peroxide for at least 10 minutes. Depending on the clinical level of each patient’s illness, the time frame of the dosage was increased. Patients received 10-minute dosages either two times a day, or four times a day for five weeks, or 15-minute dosages six times a day for two weeks. After using the solution for the designated amount of time, all four patients had no bleeding when dentists probed the gums as well as no or less bacterial sites.

While hydrogen peroxide does not have the same powers as antiseptics, it works to clear away debris through oxidation, which is why it is very effective for getting rid of dental plaque. Additionally, this may mean that hydrogen peroxide can be used as a tool against bad breath because it prevents bacteria buildup in the mouth if used on a regular basis.

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