Posts Tagged ‘coffee’

Coffee: The Good and the Bad

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

1242486_53460870A recent study published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found that those who drink an excessive amount of coffee could have an increased mortality rate. While coffee has been hailed for its health benefits, this new study shows that an extreme amount of coffee could have adverse effects. Coffee has been known to cause bad breath, so maybe it’s best that you stick to three cups or less anyway!

Researchers said that while they do not believe that coffee is the direct cause of increased mortality rate, it may have some association with it. Women between the ages of 20 and 54 who drank more than 28 cups of coffee each week, or more than four cups each day, were more likely to die from any cause more than those who drank moderate amounts of coffee. Men had a 1.5 times increased risk of death compared with their moderate coffee drinker counterparts.

“People who drink more coffee may be prone to higher mortality; however, this may not be cause-and-effect, as there may be something else about the person who drinks 10 cups per day such as an addicting personality or is easily stressed out,” co-author of the study Carl J. Lavie, medical director of cardiac rehabilitation and prevention at Ochsner Medical Center, told MedPage Today.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Teen Habits and their Effect on Oral Hygiene

Thursday, June 13th, 2013

1184390_72579423Parents strive to teach their children good habits at a young age with the hope that they will continue a healthy lifestyle into adulthood. But once kids hit their teenage years, rebellion takes over and those productive manners may go out the window. Keeping up with good oral health habits as an adolescent can ensure that the gums, teeth and mouth are in top condition for a lifetime. Here are a few things to consider in order to maintain those pearly whites and fresh breath:

Gum

For many teenagers, chewing gum is routine. From the classroom to going out with friends, teenagers have a strange tendency to always be chomping down. While some gum can actually improve breath and help avoid dry mouth, typical packs from the super market are loaded with sugar. Instead of picking up a stick of gum with a layer of “fruit,” try sugarless gum made with the natural sweetener xylitol after meals. Consider having this all-natural gum around the house so your teenager won’t be tempted to pick up a sugar-loaded pack.

Piercings

Body piercings have become much more acceptable in modern society, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t consequences that come along with them. Tongue and lip piercings can cause teeth to chip and gums to recede. In addition, these piercings can be prone to infection, which causes bad breath and creates other issues throughout the entire mouth. Encourage children to avoid this type of body art.

Soda/sports drinks

Teenagers can sometimes down soda like it is water! There are countless harmful side effects to drinking these carbonated beverages, and they can wreak havoc on the entire mouth. Not only is one can filled with 38 grams of sugar or more, its sticky, syrupy texture lingers on the teeth, gums and tongue for much too long. Drinking just one bottle of soda pop a day can increase the amount of anaerobic bacteria in the mouth, cause bad breath, promote tooth decay and dry out the mouth. Unfortunately, sports drinks are not much better. Kids who play sports in school tend to carry along one of these beverages after or during a meet or game, but they are often loaded with a similar amount of sugar as soda. Instead, encourage teenagers to drink plenty of water, or even coconut water. Coconut water is all-natural and rehydrates better than typical sports drinks.

(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Learn to Battle Your Sugar Addiction

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

1174350_90884706When you think of an addiction, you’re probably thinking of a life-ruining substance, but research shows that sugar addiction may cause the body to respond in the same ways it would when introduced a habit-forming drug. Maybe that’s why you can’t end a meal without a sweet treat or you routinely toss five sugar packets in your coffee each morning. Whatever your bad sugar habit may be, it can be a leading cause of bad breath.

Sugar and your oral health
Sugar is the mouth’s worst enemy. It acts as food for the anaerobic bacteria that live in the mouth and produce foul odors. Sugars are a form of fermentable carbohydrate, which are introduced to the digestion process in the oral cavity. This process creates acid and a lower pH in the mouth and works against the teeth’s enamel. What this means is that your sugar addiction may be causing halitosis and tooth decay. These issues will be more severe if you do not keep up brushing, flossing and rinsing.

Steps to minimizing your addiction to sugar
Sugar is one of the top bad breath foods, and it may be in a lot more things than you think. Instead of putting yourself in a situation where you have to give up all of your sugar habits, take it one step at a time. Following any sugary treat, make sure to drink water to help wash down any remnants left in the mouth that will cause halitosis or tooth decay.

Coffee
Whether you load your morning cup of Joe up with several packets of sugar or you1331114_30176503 regularly visit the local cafe to pick up a vanilla latte, this sugar intake can be deceiving. Since coffee is naturally bitter, you may not consider this a major part of your problem – but it is. Slowly train your palate to enjoy less sugar or densely sweetened creamer. After some time, you’ll actually start to enjoy the natural taste of coffee. If you still need a little something to perk up your coffee, try it with unsweetened vanilla almond milk. The vanilla taste may be enough to satisfy your craving.

Snack swap
Pay attention to the nutritional value of the snacks you typically consume. You may find that the yogurt you’re eating is advertised as a healthy snack, but it actually has loads of sugar – this may be why you’re so dependent on it. Take some time to look at the sugar content in other similar products and swap them out for something healthier. Better yet, munch on strawberries, an apple or grapes – these naturally sweet snacks are great for your overall and oral health.

The same goes with soda. Swap out your afternoon can of cola for an ice tea sweetened with honey or agave nectar.

1 Comment »