Posts Tagged ‘cigarettes’

Risks of Chewing Tobacco on Oral Health

Friday, November 15th, 2013

452622_30653429Much has been made about the harmful effects of cigarettes on oral health as well as overall health. But what about the stuff you don’t inhale, such as snuff and chew? In fact, these forms of smokeless tobacco are on the rise among Americans. In a study conducted between 2002 and 2008, there was a 47 percent increase in the number of new smokeless tobacco users.

Snuff is a finely ground or shredded tobacco that users “dip” between the gum and cheek. Chewing tobacco comes in a loose leaf, twist or plug form, which the user places inside the cheek. In the U.S., smokeless tobacco has long been associated with baseball. Players keep a wad in their bottom lips to keep their mouth moist, then spit the liquid out onto the field. Many people know the product simply as chew, spit, dip, plug and chaw. But whatever the name, the health risks remain.

Is smokeless tobacco better for you than cigarettes?
No. All tobacco, including snuff and chew, contains nicotine, which is highly addictive. Though nicotine is absorbed more slowly from smokeless tobacco than a cigarette, the amount that enters that bloodstream is three to four times greater than its smoking counterpart, while more nicotine per dose is absorbed stays in the blood longer. According to the National Cancer Institute, at least 28 chemicals in snuff and chew have been found to cause cancer.

Gum disease
One of the most common triggers from smokeless tobacco is gum disease, also known as gingivitis (in the early stage) and periodontal disease (in the advanced stage). When you put a pinch of chew on the inside of your lip, the chemicals in the tobacco irritate and erode the gum line, causing the gums to pull away from the teeth. Many regular chew users experience receding gums and permanent discoloration of their teeth. If you’ve ever seen a picture of someone who has a history of dipping, their bottom and top rows of teeth are a brownish-yellow. As the level of the gums sink, plaque and tartar find the bigger pockets to stick to and destroy the teeth. Extreme forms of gum disease lead to tooth loss.

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Halitosis Drives People to Extreme Measures

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

If there’s one lesson I’ve learned from being a halitosis professional, it’s that people will try virtually anything to get rid of bad breath. And who can blame them? Oral odor is difficult to get rid of at the best of times, so much so that it’s usually advisable to ditch one’s run-of-the-mill dental products in favor of a specialty breath freshening regimen.

You see, specially formulated, all-natural products can moisten the mouth and oxygenate the palate, thereby neutralizing odors and effectively shoo-ing bacteria out of the oral environment. That’s the open secret of freshening breath: It all boils down to making life hard for your mouth’s microbes.

However, it’s important to do so without synthetic chemicals, irritants, allergens or other harsh substances. These ingredients generally make little or no progress in fighting bacteria; instead, they irritate the tissues in your mouth and parch your palate, making bad breath worse.

Yet these are the types of ingredients many Americans saturate their mouths with every day. And if you think that people won’t go to extremes in the effort to eliminate halitosis, well, buckle up.

Here is a list of some of the bizarrest substances used at one time or another in the fight against oral odor. And before you sneer at them, keep in mind that some of them are probably lurking in your medicine cabinet right now.

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Cigarettes Cause the Worst Bad Breath

Thursday, March 18th, 2010

According to studies, researchers found that people said that least desirable breath smell in a kissing partner was cigarette breath.  Also, the survey found that 70% of people said they don’t even want to talk to someone who has just smoked a cigarette.

Cigarettes ranked higher than garlic, Marmite, onions, beer, pickled onions, fish, curry, coffee and unbrushed teeth as the least desirable breath smell.  One of the researchers discussed how much of a big deal halitosis was in dealing with personal situations.  The researcher also mentioned that bad breath (i.e. garlic breath) may make a difference in whether or not a person lands a job.

Also, only 40% of people were brave enough to tell someone else that they had bad breath.

Want to tell someone that he or she has bad breath anonymously?  Just click here!

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