Posts Tagged ‘children’

When Pulling Teeth, Beware of Dry Mouth, Dry Sockets and Bad Breath

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

In childhood, pulling baby teeth is a rite of passage. At first it can be a little scary, but most kids get used to it, and many look forward to their next empty socket – and visit from the tooth fairy. Of course, some tykes need help with their first loose tooth, and that means being prepared as a parent to deal with blood, germs, dry mouth and bad breath.

According to a recent post at Nanny.Net, it’s not too tough to help your child pull his or her first tooth. To start, you’ll need to wash your hands, get some gauze ready and keep your little one relaxed…

Then comes the actual pulling

This can require some wiggling or apple-eating. (Ditch the string. It’s no better than using your hands.) Finally, the source recommends putting pressure on the empty socket after the tooth comes out to stanch the blood flow, then applying ice in order to numb any little aches your child may feel.

However, things don’t end there. What many parents don’t realize is that a newly pulled tooth presents a unique opening for infections, dry mouth and bad breath. In large part, this is due to a side effect familiar to nearly anyone who’s had their wisdom teeth pulled: a dry socket.

A clot, lost

Dry sockets occur when a blood clot, the one that fills the hole in lieu of a tooth, accidentally falls out. This is most common among teens and young adults, whose wisdom teeth removals often leave large, tenuous scabs at the back of the jaws. A little too much negative pressure – say, from sucking on a straw – can pop one of these clots out.

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All Natural Oral Care Products May Be Best for Children

Monday, June 6th, 2011

Many toothpastes and mouthwashes at the drug store often contain dyes to give them their bright and attractive colors. It’s a great marketing tactic. However, HealthDay News reports that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will hold a panel of healthcare experts to determine whether or not these dyes are linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

As many parents know, there are many cases of ADHD in the US. Almost 10 percent of children from age 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with this disease, according to estimates done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s about 5.4 million American children and teens!

There currently is not a clear connection established between food dyes and ADHD, however many experts have already commented saying they do suspect a connection. David Schaub, a psychiatric researcher, professor at Columbia University and FDA panel member told HealthDay News that the upcoming discussion is a “big step forward.”

While the link is still unsure, why risk it? As you probably already know, all of TheraBreath products are free of artificial dyes and preservatives. It’s also important to steer clear of alcohol, sugar and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS).  Just click on the links if you want to learn more.

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Bad Breath in Kids

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009
Bad Breath in Children Can Mean a More Serious Health Issue

Bad breath in children can get worse throughout the day because as they breathe, their mouth becomes dryer, allowing bacteria to grow. Children need to see a pediatrician especially if they have to breathe out of their mouths due to colds, sinus infections, allergies, or bigger-than-average tonsils and adenoids blocking their nasal passages. Thumb sucking can also dry out the mouth.

For children, here is a list of uncommon bad breath odors that may be a sign of a much more serious health complication:

  • Acetone – diabetes or acetone, alcohol, phenol, or salicylate ingestion
  • Ammonia – possibly a urinary tract infections or kidney failure
  • Asparagus – eating asparagus (yes, it may happen)
  • Bitter almonds – cyanide poisoning
  • Cat’s urine – odor of cats syndrome (beta-methyl-crotonyl-CoA-carboxylase deficiency)
  • Celery – Oasthouse urine disease
  • Dead fish – stale fish syndrome (trimethylamine oxidase deficiency)
  • Fresh-baked bread – typhoid fever
  • Foul – tonsillitis, sinusitis, gingivitis, lung abscess, or dental cavities
  • Garlic – arsenic, phosphorus, organic phosphate insecticides, or thallium poisoning
  • Horse-like (also described as mouse-like or musty) – phenylketonuria
  • Rancid butter – rancid butter syndrome (hypermethionemia and hypertyrosinemia)
  • Raw liver – liver failure
  • Sweaty socks – odor of sweaty feet syndrome (Isovalryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) or sweaty feet syndrome II (Green acyldehydrogenase deficiency)
  • Violets – turpentine poisoning

Also, don’t forget that little kids often stuff things in their mouth or noses, so always pay close attention, especially if there’s discolored nasal discharge.

Source: Alan Greene MD FAAP

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