Posts Tagged ‘cavity’

Red Wine as a Cavity Fighter

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

red wine cavity fighterGreat news for oenophiles: You might have heard that red wine benefits the heart, but a recent study suggests that drinking a glass of red wine a day may also prevent cavities.

For the study, which was published in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers grew bacterial cultures related to dental diseases, namely Streptococcus mutans. Then, they dipped them into different liquids including red wine, red wine without alcohol, red wine spiked with grape seed extract and water with 12 percent ethanol.

Red wine with or without alcohol as well as wine with grape seed extract proved the best at getting rid of bacteria. By fighting off odorous anaerobic bacteria with non-alcoholic red wine, you could also help avoid bad breath.

Dental diseases are extremely prevalent not only in the U.S., but throughout the world. An estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population is affected by cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss, according to the report. 

The problem originates when harmful bacteria in the mouth gather to form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that produce acid and plaque that damages the walls of the teeth. Of course, brushing with toothpastes that contain fluoride, flossing and rinsing your mouth out with alcohol-free mouthwash can help kill the bacterial plaque.  (more…)

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Fight Off Tooth Decay and Bad Breath with Magnolia Bark Extract

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

The magnolia is one of the oldest flowering tree types in the world.  Magnolia bark contains polyphenols, which have been used for centuries by Chinese and Japanese medicine.  Now, the magnolia bark chemicals have been proven to get rid of bad breath.  Research printed in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows that breath mints containing magnolia bark extract kill the majority of bacteria that cause tooth decay and bad breath within a half hour.  Magnolia bark extract significantly improves oral health around the world, and may be beneficial if used in chewing gum.

The mouth is an ideal environment for the bacteria that causes bad breath–especially four species of bacteria: Veilonella alcalescens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides melaninogenicus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.  These bacteria feed on food remains, dead cells, and other chemicals in the mouth, and in the process of their feeding, they release foul-smelling gases.  This putrefaction can lead to gum disease and tooth decay.

Regular chewing gum tends to only guard against these bacteria for a short period of time, and anti-bacterial products tend to have negative effects like tooth staining.  A team conducted a research project where they tested the power of a mint with and without the magnolia bark extract.  Without the extract, the mint destroyed just 3.6%  of the bacteria, and with the extract, 61% of the bacteria was killed. 

Furthermore, the extract has also been found to be useful for guarding against cavity-causing bacteria. 

Source: Softpedia

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