Posts Tagged ‘cavities’

A Pessimistic Attitude and Bad Breath

Monday, November 16th, 2009

pessimism effects

If you’re feeling down in the dumps….rumor has it it that you may not only have a bad attitude, but you you might have bad breath as well!  Pessimists are more likely to have dental problems, like halitosis, cavities, or missing and decayed teeth.  They are more likely to have a negative attitude about going to the dentist as well. 

This research was done on the attitudes and dental records of 1,037 people in the 30s.  These people also filled out questionnaires, one about their feelings towards dentists, and the other one rating character traits.   Some of these pessimists admitted being afraid of dental visits, avoiding checkups, and only going to the dentist when having an issue.  These people tended to be more easily stressed and less sociable.  Because of this, these people tended to have more tooth decay than those not afraid of going to the dentist, and had twice as many rotten/missing teeth and fillings by the age of 32.  These people generally had more anxiety problems and were more able to deal with life’s issues in a positive fashion.

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Five Secrets That Dentists Keep From You

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

dentist cartoon

Aside from brushing and flossing, there are other things that your dentist could you tell so you can better care for your teeth.  There are secrets that dentists know that their patients do not.  These usually include the following:

1)  Your dentist can tell if you smoke.  Even if someone brushes their teeth or tries to cover it up with mints, gum, or mouthwash, the smell is actually embedded in the mouth, especially the gum tissue!

  • Smokers are also 4X more likely to get periodontal disease than those who do not smoke.

2)  The oral bacteria that causes cavities can spread on food and cutlery.  For instance, mothers will share their utensils and food with their kids, but bad bacteria can be spread this way.  This also goes to say that one should take special care when kissing (especially their little ones) if he or she has gum disease or cavities, since these bacteria are contagious.

3)  When most people brush, they only clean less than 1/4 of their mouths!  Most people brush for 30 seconds or less, and good oral hygiene requires at least five minutes of brushing and flossing each day.  One should brush at least 2-3 minutes at a time, and floss for 1-2 minutes each time.  When people brush only 30 seconds, they are missing their back molars 90% of the time. 

4) Bleaching Teeth Too Much Can Make Them Translucent!  Teeth whitening can thin the enamel, so never bleach your teeth more than once every six months.  If the gel bothers your gums and teeth, try a fluoride rinse or gel before and after using the bleaching gel.  This will make your teeth less sensitive. 

5) Don’t get your mouth deep cleaned when you only need a regular cleaning.  Some dentists want to charge your insurance more, so they will tell you that you need a deep cleaning when you do not.  Those who need a deep cleaning are people who have a lot of tartar on their roots or other symptoms of disease. 

Source: ABC News

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Cancer Patients Need to Maintain Dental Health Prior to Therapy

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

cancer


After the recent deaths of many celebrities including Farrah Fawcett and Michael Jackson, people are realizing that maintaining their health is more important than ever. People who have just learned that they have cancer may not be thinking about taking care of their oral hygiene, but this can have significant consequences. Cancer patients who do not discuss their sitaution with a dentist before starting chemotherapy or radiation may put the health of their teeth in jeopardy or delay their treatment.

 Dr. Mitchell Josephs, a dentist at Palm Beach Towers, tells people about to start chemotherapy that they should get a dental cleaning and X-ray to make sure that there are no abscesses. If there is an emergency extraction to remove an infected tooth, this could disrupt cancer treatment. Obviously, if you have to have emergency dental work done after you started cancer treatment, your healing ability is going to be reduced.

 Therapies can also weaken teeth and cause tooth decay. Chemotherapy and radiation can reduce the mouth’s ability to produce saliva temporarily. Saliva is what protects and coats the teeth so they are not damaged by acidic foods. If a person uses a custom fluoride tray to coat the teeth in a concentrated fluoride solution daily(ten minutes a day) while going through chemotherapy, their teeth are much less likely to be discolored and weakened.

 Decay is usually caused by a very dry mouth. Inflammation of the gums can also be caused by cancer treatment. Dentures that do not fit correctly can make the situation worse by possibly causing ulcerations. This problem can be fixed by getting new dentures or dental implants for replacing the teeth permanently.

 Mouth rinses can help reduce mucositis, which is the ulceration and inflammation of the mouth’s tissue. According to Dr. Daniel Spitz, when a patient goes through chemotherapy, any underlying dental problems will increase the likelihood of there being cavities, bone loss, and tooth loss. If the blood count gets low, bacterial infections can grow out of control.

Source: Palm Beach Daily News

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Fight Off Tooth Decay and Bad Breath with Magnolia Bark Extract

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

The magnolia is one of the oldest flowering tree types in the world.  Magnolia bark contains polyphenols, which have been used for centuries by Chinese and Japanese medicine.  Now, the magnolia bark chemicals have been proven to get rid of bad breath.  Research printed in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows that breath mints containing magnolia bark extract kill the majority of bacteria that cause tooth decay and bad breath within a half hour.  Magnolia bark extract significantly improves oral health around the world, and may be beneficial if used in chewing gum.

The mouth is an ideal environment for the bacteria that causes bad breath–especially four species of bacteria: Veilonella alcalescens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides melaninogenicus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.  These bacteria feed on food remains, dead cells, and other chemicals in the mouth, and in the process of their feeding, they release foul-smelling gases.  This putrefaction can lead to gum disease and tooth decay.

Regular chewing gum tends to only guard against these bacteria for a short period of time, and anti-bacterial products tend to have negative effects like tooth staining.  A team conducted a research project where they tested the power of a mint with and without the magnolia bark extract.  Without the extract, the mint destroyed just 3.6%  of the bacteria, and with the extract, 61% of the bacteria was killed. 

Furthermore, the extract has also been found to be useful for guarding against cavity-causing bacteria. 

Source: Softpedia

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