Posts Tagged ‘cavities’

Red Wine as a Cavity Fighter

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

red wine cavity fighterGreat news for oenophiles: You might have heard that red wine benefits the heart, but a recent study suggests that drinking a glass of red wine a day may also prevent cavities.

For the study, which was published in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers grew bacterial cultures related to dental diseases, namely Streptococcus mutans. Then, they dipped them into different liquids including red wine, red wine without alcohol, red wine spiked with grape seed extract and water with 12 percent ethanol.

Red wine with or without alcohol as well as wine with grape seed extract proved the best at getting rid of bacteria. By fighting off odorous anaerobic bacteria with non-alcoholic red wine, you could also help avoid bad breath.

Dental diseases are extremely prevalent not only in the U.S., but throughout the world. An estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population is affected by cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss, according to the report. 

The problem originates when harmful bacteria in the mouth gather to form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that produce acid and plaque that damages the walls of the teeth. Of course, brushing with toothpastes that contain fluoride, flossing and rinsing your mouth out with alcohol-free mouthwash can help kill the bacterial plaque.  (more…)

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Definitive Guide: Quick answers to your oral health questions

Friday, June 20th, 2014

Quick answers oral health questions

In the last several years, there has been a heavy push underlining oral health’s role in systemic well-being. Since the mouth is the gateway to your body, it’s crucial to pay attention to the small daily steps we can take to keep those pearly whites clean and problem-free. To answer your burning questions, from getting rid of bad breath to removing tonsil stones, here are the solutions and oral health tips:

Where is my bad breath coming from?
Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can come from a range of different sources. The main culprits are: food, poor oral hygiene habits, cavities, using tobacco or alcohol, tonsil stones and dry mouth. Most often, the mouth odor comes from what you eat and your dental hygiene habits. The anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that live on the surface of the tongue and throat may derive from foods such as onions, garlic or peppers as well as other pungent foods.

It is likely that bad breath originates from plaque buildup that lingers on the teeth and gums. By failing to remove plaque through brushing, flossing and rinsing, your mouth turns into a habitable environment for the bacteria to grow and produce the foul smell.

Not filling cavities properly and skipping professional dental cleaning contributes to a rotten odor. What’s more, dentures should fit well to prevent bacteria from gathering in pockets.

Smoking or chewing tobacco and drinking alcohol dry out the mouth and cause unpleasant breath, so these habits should be avoided.

A lot of times, not drinking enough water or skipping meals can trigger halitosis. Make sure to gulp down plenty of H2O throughout the day. (more…)

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Keeping Up with Oral Health as You Age

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

oral health as you age

May is National Older Americans Month. Despite the belief that many seniors lose their natural teeth as they age, about 75 percent of people 65 and older have retained all or some of their natural teeth.

With that being said, there’s no doubt that older adults face oral health problems. Sure, one might think that he or she need not be concerned about cavities anymore. But, just like with younger people, tooth decay can cause pain and discomfort as well as wear down the gums. In fact, cavities can occur more frequently in older adults for several reasons. Firstly, seniors may not have been exposed to a fluoridated water system as children or used toothpaste that contains fluoride in the past.

As gum tissue begins to recede in older adults, cavities become more prevalent, since plaque has more space to harbor between the teeth and gums. Also, dry mouth, a result of the natural aging process and certain medications, can lead to more tooth decay. Perhaps most relevantly, older adults are also more likely to have decay around older fillings.

“I wish all fillings and dental work would last forever, but dental work requires maintenance,” Dr. Bruce Terry, a member of the Pennsylvania Dental Association, told the Digital Journal. “Everyone should be seen by their dentist regularly to see if there are any broken teeth or fillings. The health of the gum tissues can also be an early sign of several systemic diseases like diabetes.”

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The Differences Between Regular, Soy and Almond Milk

Monday, January 27th, 2014

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Many people have chosen sides for which type of milk they prefer. Cow, soy and almond varieties all provide nutritious sources of vitamins and minerals, but let’s look at which are the healthiest for your body and teeth.

For a healthy mouth, calcium and vitamin D rank as two of the best nutrients. As your mom told you, calcium helps promote strong bones and teeth. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium, thereby increasing bone density and reducing the risk for softening. This will help lower the risk of cavities and other oral health problems, including gum disease. Besides soaking up the sun, you can get a healthy dose of vitamin D from fortified cow’s milk.

Cow’s milk
What we normally call “regular” milk is cow’s milk, a product of the cow’s mammary gland. In the store, you’ll typically find four various types of milk made from cows: whole (which is 3.5 percent milk fat), 2 percent, 1 percent and fat-free. Consumers who want to cut calories typically opt for fat-free milk. As far as nutrients go, milk is a great a source of calcium, vitamin D and protein.

Lactose, the primary carbohydrate in cow’s milk, creates a digestive problem for some people who are lactose intolerant. They are often deficient in the enzyme lactase​, which is required to break down milk sugar. Too much milk (or milk products) with not enough lactase can trigger bloating, gas and diarrhea.

Soy milk
Soy milk, on the other hand, is not technically milk, but rather a beverage made from soybeans. It is made from soaking, grinding and boiling soy beans with water. This milk contains twice as much vitamin B-6 and a lot more iron than cow’s milk.

Almond milk
Almond milk is a beverage ground from almonds. Many people prefer its sweeter flavor to other milk alternatives. Since almonds are naturally very nutritious, almond milk does not need to be fortified with other ingredients like regular and soy milk. It is often the healthiest of these three milk options.

While 1 percent milk has around 30 percent of your recommended daily intake of calcium, soy milk contains roughly 6 percent of calcium. Unsweetened almond milk surpasses both of those, with 45 percent of your daily intake. There is around 25 percent of vitamin D in regular milk, none found in soy and 25 percent in almond milk. Cow’s milk has half of the total fat of soy, still less fat than almond, with almost the same amount of sugar. All nutritional facts are based on a one cup, 2,000 calorie diet.

The bottom line: Almond milk is healthier than cow’s and soy milk. It is a great alternative for those who are lactose intolerant, as well as people looking to strengthen their smile and ward off cavities.

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Racing Toward Better Dental Health with Danica Patrick

Monday, January 20th, 2014

1397111_44698680NASCAR speedster Danica Patrick has launched a new campaign to give thousands of in-need Americans better oral health. Teaming up with Aspen Dental and Oral Health, the program is called the Healthy Mouth Movement, a community initiative designed to deliver free dental care to thousands of low-income communities across the country, spreading oral health education to millions more.

“Last year 100 million Americans didn’t visit a dentist, and millions more live in communities with little or no access to dental care,” Patrick, driver of the No. 10 Chevrolet SS in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, told Digital Journal. “This is an issue that affects a lot of hard-working people, including NASCAR fans, who are often living in pain. It’s time to do something about it, and that’s why I’m proud to partner with Aspen Dental and Oral Health America.”

Too many people live with gum disease – a problem that’s 100 percent preventable – and toothaches caused by cavities. These issues are a roadblock to staying focused at school and work, and can affect the body as a whole. After all, periodontal disease, or advanced stage gum disease, has linked diabetes and oral health together. Patrick reminds us that a healthy mouth paves the way for a healthy body.

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