Posts Tagged ‘cat breath’

Pets with Bad Breath

Monday, November 29th, 2010

According to the 2009/2010 National Pet Owners Survey, 62% of all U.S. households own a pet. That is about 71.4 million homes. The majority of these pets are dogs, closely followed by cats.

But these four-legged creatures are often much more than just a pet, they are truly members of the household and family. Many of us care for these pets as if they are our own children.  We take them to the vet and groomers regularly, and spend hundreds of dollars a year on pet care.

While we give them treats (such as raw-hides) to chew on, our pets may still have dental problems and bad breath. Did you know that periodontal disease is the #1 disease in dogs and cats? Bad breath is one major sign that your pet may be suffering from this. So rather than spend large amounts of money on non-anesthetic cleanings or risk the more evasive anesthetic cleanings on your pet, try treating it naturally and effectively with Dr. Katz for Dogs + Cats Oral Solution. (more…)

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Brushing a Dog’s (or Cat’s) Teeth

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

brush dog's teeth

Does your dog have bad breath? Well, maybe you are not employing the use of proper oral hygiene. After all, us humans need to maintain a level of oral care so that we don’t have halitosis. Also, just like people, dogs and cats can get gum disease–and if a dog or cat’s gums are infected and abscessed, bacteria can enter the bloodstream, causing liver, kidney, and even heart malfunctions. So, what’s a good way to brush your best friend’s teeth?

Here are some tips for brushing your pet’s teeth:

#1 Start off slowly. Make sure to use a toothpaste formula that is specifically made for animals, since human toothpaste can give stomach upsets to animals. Have your pet lick the paste off of your finger, and you might need to try a few different flavors to find one that your pet likes.

#2 Once you can get toothpaste into the animal’s mouth, use a slight amount on your finger and run it across the dog or cat’s teeth. This might even take several days to get your pet to do this agreeably. Once your pet is fine with you doing this to its teeth, use a toothbrush (made for pets) and make small circles on the gum line. Don’t brush too hard!

#3 Be sure to cheer on your pet and express approval during this process. Afterward, you could also give your pet a treat, playtime, a walk, etc., so it will think of brushing as a positive moment.

#4 In order to practice proper oral hygiene with your pet, try to brush your pet’s teeth every day.

Here are some warning signs to look for in your pet’s mouth:

  1. Yellow or brown tartar, especially where the teeth and gums meet
  2. Red, swollen, bleeding, inflamed, tender, and/or receding gums
  3. Chronic halitosis
  4. Teeth that are chipped/broken
  5. Tooth resorption (especially common in cats)- a very painful condition in which the tooth dissolves
  6. A change in the animal’s diet, chewing habits and appetite can signify depression (along with pawing at the face/mouth).

Also, don’t forget to try this oral rinse for dogs and cats that helps prevent plaque and tartar buildup.  Be sure to practice good oral hygiene with your pet, so that the both of you can have great smiles!

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Dog Breath Remedy

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Most of us are used to the thought of dogs having bad breath, but that may not be a good thing. The dog could have serious health issues causing chronic halitosis. Bad breath is caused by the same anaerobic bacteria that causes this malodor in humans, and these bacteria generally give off a rotten egg smell, since a sulfur substance is excreted. True, dogs may eat and chew on things like rotten bones, and so on, but chronic bad breath can mean serious complications like periodontal disease. It’s a good idea to bring your dog to the vet to try and get a diagnosis. The vet will make some recommendations on what can remedy this condition, based on what causes it. Probiotics may even be helpful in remedying the halitosis. TheraBreath sells a formula specially designed for cats and dogs: just click here for our dog breath remedy. This way, you can make sure your dog kisses from Fido aren’t smelly!

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Dogs and Cats Have Bad Breath: Oral Products for Pets

Monday, June 1st, 2009

Dog Breath

Does your dog or cat have persistent bad breath? It could mean that your best friend may have a serious problem. Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis, gingivitis or gum disease) is the #1 disease in dogs and cats and bad breath is one sign that your pet may be suffering. Now, there is a way to attack it naturally and effectively.

Dr. Katz for Pets products bring to you and your pet 21st Century science, which fights odors generated by sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria. The basis of these revolutionary home treatments has been proven thousands of times through the use of oxygenating compounds.

Free Dr. Katz for Pets Trial and Printable Guide

Oral Health for Dogs

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Bad Breath in Cats and Dogs

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009

Bad Breath in Dogs Can Mean Serious Health Complications

Imagine your beloved pet coming up to you to cuddle like it does every day, but lately you’ve been noticing your pet has bad breath that is getting worse and worse.  With our furry friends, there could be multiple causes for this bad breath.  These include teeth problems, kidney dysfunction, diabetes, and foreign bodies in the mouth.

Dental disease is the most common, and dirty teeth is one of the main things that the vet will be looking for when looking in your pet’s mouth.  Other things to be checked out are the pet’s hydration status, and the color of its gums.  If the pet’s teeth are covered in chunks of calculus, the solution requires much more than brushing.  Nowadays, pet owners are more aware that their pet’s teeth need to be scaled and polished just as a human’s would.

Oral foreign bodies can cause infections, like a bone embedded in the roof of a dog’s mouth.  Metabolic disorders can occur when the pet’s kidneys are not working properly; thus, toxins in the blood can cause ulcerations in the mouth that cause bad breath. Remember that any mouth ulcerations or inflamed gums can give your pet bad breath, including viral diseases in cats. Diabetes can give a your pet’s breath a certain “ketotic” odor that your vet should recognize.

All in all, brushing and buying tartar control treats for Fido may not always be enough, so remember the possibilities!

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