Posts Tagged ‘bad breath causes’

Bad Breath in Fiction

Friday, January 14th, 2011

For many, bad breath is a part of daily life – but it doesn’t have to be if you are using TheraBreath products! Unfortunately, not everyone knows that TheraBreath stops bad breath, and our toothpastes and mouthwashes haven’t always been around.

Writers throughout history have made references to halitosis. It’s no surprise as bad breath can be caused by dry mouth, dental decay, tonsil stones, gum disease, diet and more.  Here are a few noteworthy pieces of literature that make mention of foul breath.

Canterbury Tales – written over 650 years ago, author Geoffrey Chaucer created a character called the summoner whose breath is notably foul, along with the rest of his demeanor. Even back in the 14th century, Chaucer new some of the causes of bad breath. The summoner has halitosis because “he loved garlic, onions and leeks, and for to drink wine as red as blood. “ Diet has long been a cause of stinky breath, especially aromatic foods like onions and garlic. The alcohol in wine can lead to dry mouth, making the summoner’s mouth a prime breeding ground for bad breath.

Much Ado About Nothing – William Shakespeare definitely agreed that bad breath can put a damper on intimate relationships. Benedick: “Only foul words; and thereupon I will kiss thee.” Beatrice: “Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkiss’d.” Like most singles, Beatrice found bad breath to be a huge turn off.

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Truths and Fallacies of Bad Breath Causes

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Mouth (2)Are you suffering from bad breath? If you just cupped your hand in front of your mouth when you read that and blew into it, you’re a victim of one of the fallacies that are prevalent about bad breath and bad breath causes. You cannot smell your own bad breath. The body isn’t built that way. It has a defense mechanism which protects you from being overwhelmed by your own odors. Others can smell it, but you can’t.

Another fallacy about bad breath causes is that it is caused by poor oral hygiene. This can contribute to the condition, but it’s not the cause. Bad breath, also known as halitosis, is caused by the sulfur emissions of anaerobic bacteria which live in everyone’s mouth. Not cleaning your teeth will provide nourishment to these bacteria, causing them to produce more sulfur. That is what causes that smell, not rotting food between your teeth as many people believe. (more…)

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This Gadget Can Test for Bad Breath!

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

breath test

So, it’s common knowledge that bad breath isn’t something that people are too fond of.  It can hurt friendships, work relationships, romances, and so on.  Allegedly, Barack Obama wakes up ‘stinky and snory’, according to his wife Michelle!

Now, in the United Kingdom, a machine that is 50 times more sensitive than the human nose exists that can supposedly get rid of halitosis – for good!  This gas chromatography machine measures and identifies the three primary types of bad breath-causing bacteria.  It doesn’t just say if someone has halitosis, but it specifically identifies the kinds of molecules that are causing the problem.  This helps dental professionals target the halitosis more precisely.  This machine was developed in Australia, and it costs around £8,000 (which is over $12,000 in America).   The machine works by having patients give a breath sample into a plastic syringe, and it usually gives results within 15 minutes. 

After diagnosing the bad breath, the dentists recommend nasal flushes, medicated mouthwash, etc., in order to banish the anaerobic bacteria causing the bad breath.  Depending on where the anaerobic bacteria is located (i.e. mouth, throat, or nose), it gives off different smells.  The tongue is usually the culprit if the bad breath is coming from the mouth, since the smell could be comng from proteins being broken down into amino acids.  In the throat, bad breath often comes from the tonsils, from certain growths that are usually formed by food debris.  Tonsil stones are not uncommon.  Through the nose, sinus infections and excess mucus (post nasal drip) often cause bad smells.

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Get Rid of Bad Breath from Onions and/or Garlic

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

garlic onions

Sometimes brushing your teeth after eating onions or garlic won’t stop you from having bad breath. Garlic can stay in your lungs for 1-2 days after you consume it! Therefore, making your breath fresh after eating onions and garlic is more complex than brushing your teeth and gargling. Here are some pointers:

  1. Try drinking some green or mint tea after consuming garlic/onions.
  2. Eat a lemon/drink lemonade.
  3. Chew on parsley, mint leaves, or other strong-tasting fresh herbs
  4. Try eating mixed veggies crushed into a mashed potato like mushrooms, carrots, and other types.
  5. Chew mint/spearmint flavored gum
  6. Drink a small amount of alcohol because it can kill the bacteria that feeds on leftover food in the oral cavity. 
  7. Eat a hard cheese like cheddar or swiss (not American) to cover up the smell
  8. You can try to use a smaller amount of onion or garlic while cooking
  9. Use a spoon to clean off your tongue if you don’t have access to a tongue scraper
  10. Don’t forget to brush your teeth and rinse out your mouth, of course.
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Stop Bad Breath, Halitosis

Monday, December 7th, 2009

Bad breath plagues everyone from time to time.  In order to cure bad breath, one must know what is causing it.  The cause determines the cure for halitosis.  Sometimes food can cause bad breath (i.e. foods with spices like cumin and curry) for days on end, after they’re eaten and digested.  Food that becomes stuck in the oral cavity and lodged between teeth can definitely cause foul smells.  Poor dental health like tooth decay, a lack of oral cleanliness and periodontal diseases can all contribute to the bacteria that causes bad breath.  These bacteria build up between the teeth and omit foul odors.  It is important to practice good oral hygiene by brushing teeth regularly and using floss and oral rinse after eating.  Also, one should take trips to the dentist at least twice a year.

Morning breath is extremely common among humans because some people have their mouths open while sleeping, which dries the tongue, gum, and cheek tissues.  Saliva, which normally flows through the mouth during waking hours, cleans up dead cells.  When one is sleeping, this does not happen, thus creating halitosis.

Underlying illnesses can frequently cause bad breath, like some cancers, diabetes, liver issues, lung sicknesses, kidney failure, lingering acid backwash, and metabolism problems.  If you have any abnormal symptoms, you should get checked out by a doctor.

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