Posts Tagged ‘bad breath cause’

Video of the Week

Monday, November 5th, 2007

Dr. Katz, our Bad Breath Detective, makes an appearance in FOX 11 news in L.A. His headline– Bad breath can be an indicator of a more serious disease. For example, sweet breath may be an indicator of Leukemia, and people with kidney problems develop a fish odor when they eat foods with protein.

In this video, we see the progress of Mark, one of Dr. Katz’s patients. Let’s see how he finally finds the solution to bad breath with a little help from Dr. Katz.

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Gum Disease Linked to Heart Disease

Thursday, October 25th, 2007

In The Toronto Daily News, we read about how the health of your gums is directly related to the health of your heart. Gum disease is no less serious than other bodily diseases, and should be prevented with purposeful, conscientious oral hygiene. Dr. Katz has created Periotherapy and Hydrofloss for daily gum care.An increasing evidence shows a link between gum disease and heart disease.

PerioTherapyA French study, reported just last month at the Congress of the European Society of Cardiology, has shown that the more severe the periodontal (gum) disease, the more widespread the damage to the arteries.

It’s not yet known how gum disease might trigger heart disease, but there’s a suggestion that bacteria released from infected gums may enter the bloodstream where they activate the immune system causing inflammation and narrowing of the blood vessels.

Bacteria also cause tooth decay. They collect on and between the teeth as dental plaque, and react with sugars in our diet to destroy the tooth enamel. The result: is inflammation, cavities, root canal infection and gum disease.

The role of fluoride in preventing tooth decay is well established – whether that fluoride comes from fluoridated water or from pastes, mouthwashes or gels. Dental fluorosis, mottling or marks on the teeth from excessive fluoride intake, is rare but occasionally occurs in children at the time of the formation of tooth enamel if the children swallow too much fluoride from either pastes or supplementation.

So parents should clean their infants’ teeth with just a soft brush – no toothpaste; and for older children, up to the age of six years, the tooth pastes specially formulated for children (containing a low concentration of fluoride) should be used.

For adult tooth cleaning, I recommend Waterpik Sensonic Professional Toothbrush. It works on advanced, high-speed SONIC plaque removal. It’s softer and gentler than other electronic toothbrushes and buffs the tooth surface and hard-to-reach areas between teeth and the gumline. For more advanced gum problems, there’s Hydrofloss, which works on hydromagnetic techonology to blast away hard to reach plaque.

Gum disease is very common. Generally it can be managed by reasonable attention to oral hygiene; but recurrent or ongoing gum disease may be indicative of a serious underlying cause.

Gingivitis is the name given to inflammation of the gums. Periodontitis is a more severe form of gingivitis when the connective tissue around the teeth is progressively destroyed. Apart from lack of attention to tooth and gum care, other factors which might frequently cause or worsen these conditions are common mouth infections, such as oral thrush, more serious infections (such as HIV) where the immune system is compromised, poorly controlled diabetes, smoking and certain medicines, notably: phenytoin, cyclosporin and the calcium channel blocker blood pressure medicines. Periotherapy is available for those who need gum repair and need to take extra care of their gums on a daily basis.

Medicines are also a major, possibly the most common, cause of dry mouth known medically as xerostomia.

As we get older, all our body secretions are reduced in both quantity and quality. We get dry skin, dry eye and we’re more likely to have dry mouth. When taking a few medicines as well, then dry mouth becomes a strong probability.

Antidepressants are among those most commonly implicated, but the list of possible offenders also includes some non-prescription medicines such as antihistamines (particularly the older, more sedating antihistamines) and the so-called anticholinergic medicines used for stomach cramp. The high dose codeine-containing pain relievers might also be a problem for some people.

There are a number of useful products for the treatment of dry mouth – mouth sprays, mouthwashes, gels and toothpastes. Pharmaceutical Society’s Self Care health information program has a fact card titled Dry Mouth which offers suggestions on how to avoid this condition. Therabreath oral rinse and toothgel oxidize the mouth and prevent dry mouth.

The Mouth Ulcers card is another useful fact card. It explains the likely causes and the possible `cures’. Local trauma is often the reason for a mouth ulcer – maybe from a hard bristle toothbrush, dentures or some other form of orthodontic appliance.

Periotherapy Oral Rinse is especially helpful for people who are experiencing the onset of periodontal disease. When combined with the Periotherapy toothpaste treatment and the Hydrofloss it is extremely effective at halting gum diseases. It attacks the initial production of the Volatile Sulfur Compounds before symptoms get worse, preventing serious gum problems.

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Gum disease a silent epidemic for seniors

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

“Savvy Senior” tells us about gum disease — the current statistics, the causes and effects, and the simple preventive measures we can take. Gum disease is more common — and more dangerous than you think. Periotherapy and good oral hygiene are the best weapons against gum disease.

Gum disease — silent but deadly.

October 16, 2007

Dear Savvy Senior: I recently read that gum disease can cause all different types of deadly health conditions. As a senior who brushes regularly and flosses occasionally, what can you tell me about this? — Hate to Floss

Dear Floss: By taking better care of your mouth (which includes daily flossing), you could actually add years to your life! Here’s what you should know.

Dental Services If you don’t have dental insurance or can’t afford professional dental care, some communities and clinics offer discounted or free services to seniors in need, and most dental schools offer low-cost checkups and cleanings. Contact your state dental association (see www.ada.org/ada/organizations ) or your Area Agency on Aging (call (800) 677-1116 to get your local number) to find out what may be available in your area. Also check out the Bureau of Primary Health Care ( www.ask.hrsa.gov/pc ; (888) 275-4772) and the National Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped ( www.nfdh.org — click on “Donated Dental Services” or call (888) 471-6334).

Gum disease

Bleeding GumsAlso known as periodontal disease, gum disease is a silent epidemic in this country. Currently, 80 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of gum disease – which ranges from simple gum inflammation (called gingivitis), to serious a disease (called periodontitis) that can infect the gums, bone and other tissue surrounding the teeth.

Consequences

If you have gum disease, you have greatly increased your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. How? Because the bacteria-rich plaque that builds up on your teeth (that’s what causes gum disease) releases toxins into your bloodstream that can inflame your arteries and cause small blood clots. But that’s not all. There are other health problems linked to gum disease such as pancreatic cancer, respiratory diseases, kidney disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach ulcers and even pregnancy complications.

Are you at risk?

Most people develop gum disease because they simply don’t keep their mouths clean. But there are other factors that can increase your risk, including:
• Smoking: Need another reason to quit? Smoking is the number one risk factor for gum disease.
• Age: Older people have a greater risk of periodontal disease because they have more wear and tear on their gums.
• Genetics: If you have a family history of gum disease your risk goes up.
• Medications: Some medications (antihistamines, antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, some heart medicines and many others) can cause dry mouth, and the lack of saliva contributes to gum disease. If you have dry mouth, talk to your doctor or dentist.
• Deficient diet: A diet lacking proper amounts of calcium and vitamin C can contribute to gum disease too.
• Hormonal changes: Changes that occur during pregnancy, menopause or even menstruation can make gums more susceptible for women.
• Diabetes: People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing gum disease. It also makes blood glucose levels harder to control.

Savvy Tip: Check your risk for gum disease at www.perio.org — click on “Assess Your Gum Disease Risk.”

Simple solutions

It only takes about five minutes a day to keep your gums healthy. Here are some simple and familiar ways you can take the bite out of gum disease:
Floss guy• Brush: At least twice a day brush your teeth using fluoride toothpaste and learn how to brush properly. See www.webmd.com/oral-health for a refresher course on brushing and flossing. Also use a toothbrush that has soft bristles. Hard or stiff bristles are more likely to injure your gums. And be sure to replace your brush every three months or so. (Tip: Power toothbrushes with rotating or vibrating bristles have shown to be more effective at removing plaque than manual brushes. See www.oralb.com for oral care products.)
• Floss: Do it at least once a day either before or after you brush. The sequence doesn’t matter as long as you do a thorough job. Flossing removes plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line and is absolutely necessary.• Get checkups: See your dentist every six months for regular cleanings and oral exams.

Source: (http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com)

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Tooth loss may predict later-life dementia: study

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Megan Rauscher explains why the loss of your teeth may predict the loss of your sanity later in life. Lack of proper gum care causes or aggravates unhealthy gums, weakening of teeth, and eventual loss of teeth. Dr. Harold Katz, of course, has a solution. Periotherapy keeps gums healthy and teeth intact.

TheraBreath

Don’t lose your teeth, and your mind

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – To keep dementia at bay, take care of your teeth. That seems to be the message of a new study in which researchers found a possible link between tooth loss or having very few teeth — one to nine, to be exact — and the development of dementia later in life.

The research team analyzed dental records and brain function test results accumulated over 12 years for 144 people enrolled in the Nun Study – a long-term study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease among Catholic sisters of the School Sisters of Notre Dame. The participants ranged in age from 75 to 98 years.

Among subjects free of dementia at the first cognitive exam, those with no teeth or fewer than nine teeth had a greater than 2-fold increased risk of becoming demented later in life compared with those who had 10 or more teeth, the researchers found.

Roughly one third of subjects with fewer than nine teeth, or no teeth, had dementia at the first cognitive exam.

Dr. Pamela Sparks Stein of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and associates report their findings in The Journal of the American Dental Association.

A number of prior studies have shown that people who suffer from dementia are more likely than their cognitively intact counterparts to have poor oral health, largely due to neglect of oral hygiene.

The current study is one of only a few that asked: Does poor health contribute to the development of dementia? These results suggest it may, although the Kentucky team cautions that it is not clear from the study whether the association is “causal or casual.”

“Common underlying conditions may simultaneously contribute to both tooth loss and dementia,” Stein noted in comments to Reuters Health. In addition to gum disease, early-life nutritional deficiencies, infections or chronic diseases that may result simultaneously in tooth loss and damage to the brain, she explained.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Dental Association, October 2007.

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Like a breath of fresh air, even after the onion

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Marian Scott of The Gazette writes about her interview with Dr. Harold Katz as he continues his crusade against bad breath in Montreal.

Halitosis doctor. Easiest way to fight jungle mouth: drink more water.

Published: Tuesday, October 16

Harold Katz bit into a raw onion and watched the numbers shoot up on his Halimeter.

The box, which looks like a large clock radio, measures bad breath. “It went up to 2,000,” Katz observed.

Bad breath doesn’t get any worse than this.

A reading of zero to 100 means your mouth smells okay, explained the Los Angeles dentist, in town to promote his line of breath-freshening products.Anything over 200 can be grounds for marriage breakdown, job loss or even suicide.

Suicide?

That’s right.

Since he gave up his regular practice 12 years ago to wage full-time war on halitosis, Katz has seen its ravages.

He has treated patients who tried to slit their wrists, couples who sleep with a pillow between them, employees forced to work from home and lovelorn Romeos who can’t get a date – all because of jungle mouth.

One patient had her sweat glands removed and several had teeth pulled in unsuccessful attempts to tame the problem.

Katz has developed a mouthwash, toothpaste and breath spray, available in drugstores, under the brand name TheraBreath. He even sells clean-breath products for dogs and cats.

One person in three has bad breath, and most adults wake up with it in the morning.

And most of the things we use to fight it – mouthwash, toothpaste, breath mints and gum – don’t work, said Katz.

That’s because most contain ingredients like alcohol that cause a dry mouth – the No. 1 cause of halitosis, Katz explained. “If your tongue is pink and glistening, your breath is probably okay.”

A white coating on your tongue is a sign your mouth is overproducing anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria that cause bad breath.

Sugar in gums and mints feed those bacteria.

Drinking six to eight glasses of water a day is the best way to cure bad breath. Foods that freshen breath include celery, carrots, apples and watermelon.

Katz also recommends taking vitamin C, D and zinc.

Spending five minutes a day in the sun is an even better way to get your vitamin D, he added.

Coffee causes dehydration and sours your breath, said Katz, who downs six to eight cups of java every day. “I always have a chaser of water.”

It’s a myth that bad breath comes from food digesting in your stomach. However, halitosis does plague lactose-intolerant people who eat dairy products. The odour-causing bacteria that break down proteins are working overtime in their mouths and throats.

It’s no surprise that cigarettes and liquor make your breath stink. The reason is that dry the mouth.

The anaerobic bacteria that cause bad bread feast on post-nasal drip. Snoring and bad breath often go hand-in-hand.

Babies’ breath smells sweet because they have plenty of saliva. After age 25, our mouths get progressively drier.

Many medications cause dry mouth, including antihistamines, antidepressants and blood-pressure medications.

Katz started researching halitosis when his 13-year-old daughter came home in tears because friends were complaining about her breath.

“She said, ‘All my friends keep offering me mints and gum.’ ”

She had good oral hygiene and still has no cavities at age 28. The culprit was a rough tongue and large tonsils, combined with a dry mouth from doing sports. “That combination became a breeding ground for bacteria.”

Katz won’t divulge the names of celebrities he has treated for halitosis, but he does say that singers often have the problem because their mouths get dry.

One patient found out about her bad breath the hard way.

“She was belting out a song and the people in the front row got up and left,” he said.

“It’s well known that Clark Gable had terrible breath.” The silver-screen heartthrob wore dentures.Katz swished with his patented mouthwash to erase the onion fumes. Seconds later, his breath reading was down to a kissable 114.

His fresh-breath crusade has earned him far more kudos than his regular dental practice ever did, Katz said. “You could do the best root canal in the world, no one’s going to thank you.

“But if you cure their bad breath, you’ve got a friend for life.”

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