Posts Tagged ‘bad breath cause’

Bad Breath in Kids

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009
Bad Breath in Children Can Mean a More Serious Health Issue

Bad breath in children can get worse throughout the day because as they breathe, their mouth becomes dryer, allowing bacteria to grow. Children need to see a pediatrician especially if they have to breathe out of their mouths due to colds, sinus infections, allergies, or bigger-than-average tonsils and adenoids blocking their nasal passages. Thumb sucking can also dry out the mouth.

For children, here is a list of uncommon bad breath odors that may be a sign of a much more serious health complication:

  • Acetone – diabetes or acetone, alcohol, phenol, or salicylate ingestion
  • Ammonia – possibly a urinary tract infections or kidney failure
  • Asparagus – eating asparagus (yes, it may happen)
  • Bitter almonds – cyanide poisoning
  • Cat’s urine – odor of cats syndrome (beta-methyl-crotonyl-CoA-carboxylase deficiency)
  • Celery – Oasthouse urine disease
  • Dead fish – stale fish syndrome (trimethylamine oxidase deficiency)
  • Fresh-baked bread – typhoid fever
  • Foul – tonsillitis, sinusitis, gingivitis, lung abscess, or dental cavities
  • Garlic – arsenic, phosphorus, organic phosphate insecticides, or thallium poisoning
  • Horse-like (also described as mouse-like or musty) – phenylketonuria
  • Rancid butter – rancid butter syndrome (hypermethionemia and hypertyrosinemia)
  • Raw liver – liver failure
  • Sweaty socks – odor of sweaty feet syndrome (Isovalryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency) or sweaty feet syndrome II (Green acyldehydrogenase deficiency)
  • Violets – turpentine poisoning

Also, don’t forget that little kids often stuff things in their mouth or noses, so always pay close attention, especially if there’s discolored nasal discharge.

Source: Alan Greene MD FAAP

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Getting Close on Valentine’s Day without embarrassing Bad Breath

Thursday, January 31st, 2008

The Day of Hearts is coming again – a time when we celebrate romantic love, cherish it with our special someone, or celebrate the beginnings of a romantic relationship. It is different things for different people. Some of us will have a valentine, some of us won’t.getting closeChances are though, on Valentines Day, we will get close to someone.We will meet new people. Because of this, having fresh breath at all times is very important, because you never know when it’s time to get close. How can you have on-the-date freshness if you don’t have time to brush?

Be armed and safe with Therabreath Gum and Zox Mints. “French Kiss”, the gum used by Hollywood Celebrities is also available.

Why won’t regular gum do? Why does it have to be Therabreath? Because most gum out there in the market are sugar-based, and sugar actually feeds the anaerobic bacteria already in mouth. The worse thing that you can do is pop an Altoid in your mouth after you eat – unless you’re egalitarian and you feel that the bacteria should eat too.

Now. . . Exactly what do I put in my gum that makes it so great at keeping your breath fresh? Simple. . . zox

First, I’ve included Zinc Gluconate. Zinc is a known inhibitor of acid production by mutans streptococci (the bacteria in your mouth that cause bad breath). These bacteria thrive in an acidic environment, so when you neutralize acids you kill bacteria (and you help prevent that annoying tinny, metallic taste). In addition, a high level of oral acids is bad for your tooth enamel, so you’re helping to keep a brighter, whiter smile as well. Zinc ions also perform an interesting function when they meet anaerobic bacteria – they “clog” up certain receptors on the outer cell wall of anaerobic bacteria, so that that “bugs” cannot create sulfur compounds. (Zinc gluconate is the best tasting of all the zinc compounds which can be used in oral products.) Lastly, Zinc Gluconate (and only Zinc Gluconate) has been proven to restore sour/bitter/metallic tastes. Studies have shown that people with long term taste disorders can experience a rejuvenation of their taste buds after long-term use of Zinc gluconate gum or lozenges. . . (which is what we use in ZOX and all of our chewing gum formulas – as well as ALL Plus formulas.)

Second, I’ve used Xylitol as a sweetener, instead of sugar or Aspartame (Nutrasweet) like so many other chewing gums. Xylitol is an all-natural sweetener made from the bark of hardwood trees. It is also naturally produced in small quantities in our own bodies.

It is a sugar alcohol, with makes it safe for diabetics because the body doesn’t react to sugar alcohols the same way that it does to sucrose or glucose (found in most of the popular kiddy-flavored gums, such as Big Red, Juicy Fruit, etc.)

Most importantly, it has an interesting property in that it has been proven to fight tooth decay and is the only “sweetener” that does so – the complete opposite of sugar – which oral bacteria use to generate acids, which lead to tooth decay.

Simply put, a good amount of xylitol provides a healthy environment for an oral ecosystem.

Finally, I’ve included Oxygenating Compounds, specially designed to work with chewing gum base, to gently bathe your mouth and throat with oxygenating molecules designed to neutralize any and all volatile sulfur compounds, located in your mouth, throat, tonsils, and even in the upper reaches of your esophagus. Every time you swallow, your saliva – now loaded with oxygen and zinc molecules – bathes the back of your tongue, throat, tonsils area, and even the very beginning of your esophagus, a formerly ignored hiding place for anaerobic sulfur-producing bacteria.

Don’t go out on Valentines without these essentials. Carry your box of chocolates in one hand, your roses in the other, and Therabreath Gum or Zox mints in your pocket. The sweetness of your breath really does effect how sweet a time you’ll have with your loved one.

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Scientists bringing bad breath out of the closet

Monday, January 14th, 2008

Tom of “Up to your health” writes about the taboo that is bad breath. Scientists are bringing it out into the open and brainstorming to keep it out of existence. The science of bad breath – revealed.

CHICAGO – On the list of social offenses, bad breath ranks right up there with flatulence and body odor.
And while store shelves are well stocked with remedies ranging from chewing gum and mouthwash to breath strips and drops, researchers are just starting to understand the science of bad breath.

“It’s taboo,” said Patricia Lenton, a clinical researcher at the University of Minnesota’s School of Dentistry. “You are typecast as the smelly person.”

Lenton was one of nearly 200 scientists who attended the International Conference on Breath Odor Research this week in Chicago. Attendees ranged from dentists, chemists and microbiologists to psychologists and even flavor researchers.

Their research ran the gamut from studies on the most effective natural flavors for treating bad breath — cinnamon is a good choice — to the development of an artificial nose for sniffing out oral malodor and links between exhaled air and disease.

“We want to advance the science in this field,” said Christine Wu, a researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Dentistry, who helped organize the conference.

“In dental research, bad breath is neglected because it is not a disease that will kill people,” she said in an interview. “But it’s a huge problem. Everybody suffers from bad breath at one point in their lifetime.”

For most, bad breath occurs when bacteria in the mouth breaks down proteins, producing volatile sulfur compounds that make for foul-smelling breath.

Dry mouth, tooth decay, certain prescription drugs, sinus problems, even diseases like diabetes can cause bad breath.

Most bad breath originates in the mouth, and about 90 percent of the smell comes from the tongue, Lenton said.

“It’s warm. It’s moist. It’s like a large incubator of bacteria,” she said.

Lenton said good oral care is the best weapon for routine bad breath. She recommends regular brushing and flossing, a tongue scraper to remove bacteria from the back of the tongue, and a final rinse with antibacterial mouthwash.

For some, however, it is not actual bad breath that’s the problem. Lenton said anywhere from 4 to 17 percent of the people who seek treatment for breath odor are convinced they have bad breath — even though they do not.

It is a condition some refer to as halitophobia, or the fear of bad breath, and it can interfere with daily life.

“It’s an obsessive compulsive disorder,” Lenton said.

Lenton and Wu hope the conference and others like it will raise the profile of breath research.

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Start the New Year with a Bang, Not with Bad Breath

Monday, December 31st, 2007


Happy New Year! Most of us will be starting the year with a party, singing Auld Lang Syne whiletoasting and drinking to our heart’s content.New Year’s Eve parties usually mark the end of the year past and the beginning of the coming year, and alcohol is a staple presence in these parties. It is good to keep everything in moderation — you would want to remember that party, and not have the party remember you for the wrong reasons, right?It is still possible to have great fun without losing consciousness and proper judgment. Make sure that you are sober enough to drive when you do go home, or have a sober person drive you home.

One thing that you also have to be aware of is your breath. Alcohol consumption causes bad breath, something that you wouldn’t want to have in any party.

Alcohol is one of the top bad breath instigators — just next to cigarettes. It is a DESSICANT, or drying agent that makes the anaerobic bacteria in your mouth go crazy and party along with those smelly VSC’s or Volatile Sulfur compounds. You are starting the Year of the Rat, not the year of the Dragon Breath! As you know from information in this website and possibly your own personal problem, the dryer your mouth gets – the worse your breath gets.

Here’s how much alcohol (in Percentage and Proof) is contained in the leading products below:

Product

% Alcohol

As Proof

Other “BAD” Ingredients

Jack Daniels Bourbon

43%

86

bad breath and halitosis

Amaretto Liqueur

28%

56

bad breath and halitosis

Wine – Chardonnay

12.5%

25

bad breath and halitosis

Wine – Merlot

11.5%

23

bad breath and halitosis

Beer

3

6

bad breath and halitosis

TheraBreath

0%

0

bad breath and halitosis

The most common drying agent in food is Alcohol. Alcohol of course is the basis of all “adult” beverages such as Beer, Wine, and Hard liquor. It is used quite often in laboratories to “dry out” hard to reach areas in test tubes and beakers. It is also used, unfortunately in mouthwash, where it only makes the problem worse. If you’re planning to gargle with the same old alcohol-based mouthwash just right before going to that party, or after, before you drive, stop right there.

Your current store bought mouthwash contains ALCOHOL that dries your mouth and SWEETENER that actually feeds the smelly bacteria in your mouth.

That burning sensation you get from regular mouthwash doesn’t kill the bacteria, it just irritates your mouth. We’ll show what WILL do the job quickly and effectively without irritation.

Commercial products are based on outdated theories—That alcohol can stop these problems. In fact, alcohol-based mouthwash may create poor oral health, because it dries out the mouth which in turn causes an increase of dangerous Volatile Sulfur Compounds.

Just a tiny amount of alcohol can make your mouth dry instantly. As we already know, a dry mouth mimics an anaerobic (low oxygen) environment. Now, you’ve already learned what happens when the mouth is dry – it’s a perfect environment for the anaerobes to multiply and create more bad breath! Those strong mediciny or minty tastes are actually put into the mouthwash to mask bad breath – not get rid of it! (By the way, the leading mouthwash contains 27% alcohol – that’s more than a six pack of beer, and believe me, the beer tastes better!) And another interesting point – why do they make their mouthwash blue, green, or brown? What does color have to do with getting rid of bad breath?The answer, is, nothing.

Dr. Katz has created the mouthwash that addresses the root of the bad breath problem.Therabreath mouthwash does not contain alcohol and is the best solution to getting rid of bad breath before and after alcohol intake. It contains aloe vera which is good for gum health, does not contain saccharin (a sugar that feeds the bacteria), and does not leave a stinging feeling in the mouth – falsely believed by many as a sign of great breath. Gargling with alcoholic mouthwash after drinking alcohol is like swallowing ice in a snowy, cold day – it doesn’t make sense. You are merely aggravating the drying effects of the alcohol you drank.

One thing you must also avoid aside from alcohol-based mouthwash is breath mints or gum that are sugar-based. A common “solution” to situational bad breath is to pop a sugar-based breath mint or sugar-based gum. Although you may have a cinnamon-like taste in your mouth, what you’ve really just done is made your bad breath problem MUCH worse. Let me explain:

During your party dinner, you introduced two ‘triggers’ to your mouth (protein and alcohol) that weren’t previously there and made your particular oral environment very eager to begin creating those foul-smelling VSC’s.

Then after dinner, by sucking on that mint, you actually gave those bacteria a food source they LOVE (sugar) to help along the VSC production. Yes, it’s true you TASTE cinnamon or mint, but that’s only a temporary cover up and what people actually SMELL is usually a lot worse.

Dr. Katz has invented a breath mint that really does it job. It’s called Zox — The First Breath Mint To Actually NEUTRALIZE Bad Breath Production.

Dr. Katz created ZOX because he wanted to address the fact that almost all the other ‘breath mints’ on the market DO NOT take into account the principles of halitosis prevention that he’s been studying for the last 10 years. Most of them are created to TASTE GOOD and that’s about it. ZOX was created based on the same clinically proven Zinc/Oxygen/Xylitol principles used by the rest of the TheraBreath product line. It is literally bad breath prevention science packed into a roll of breath mints.

ZOX has no sugar – your breath mint should NEVER have sugar in it. ZOX uses xylitol which is a natural sweetener and has also been proven to have tremendous anti-decay properties.

Dr. Katz also has sugar-free gum alteranatives – Therabreath gum, “French Kiss” (a cinammon flavored gum used in Hollywood) and “Guy” a gum created especially for guys.

So eat, drink, and be merry, but don’t forget to be conscious of your breath.Check out the www.therabreath.com to find the best product that will enable you to enjoy the New Year’s eve festivities (and the entire year to come) without bad breath worries. Therabreath is also available in select stores – please check out the store locator for the location nearest you.

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Overweight People More Likely To Have Bad Breath, Study Finds

Monday, December 17th, 2007

The health of your body directly affects the health of your mouth. Obesity is found to be linked to having bad breath.  For the bad breath cure that helps people of all shapes and sizes, turn to Therabreath, the only real solution for bad breath.

ScienceDaily (Dec. 14, 2007) — Now there’s another good reason to go on that diet after the holidays. Tel Aviv University researchers have published a study that finds a direct link between obesity and bad breath: the more overweight you are, the more likely your breath will smell unpleasant to those around you.

The research, led by breath expert Prof. Mel Rosenberg from the Department of Human Microbiology and The  Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, was reported in the Journal of Dental Research in October. The study also reported, for the first time, scientific evidence that links bad breath to alcohol consumption.

“The finding on alcohol and bad breath was not surprising because the anecdotal evidence was already there,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “However, the finding that correlated obesity to bad breath was unanticipated.”

A Weighty Sample

The study was done in Israel and included a sample of 88 adults of varying weights and heights. While at a clinic for a regular check-up, they were asked by graduate student Tsachi Knaan, a co-author in the study, whether he could test the odor of their breath and ask questions about their daily habits.

Prof. Rosenberg, Knaan and Prof. Danny Cohen concluded from the data that overweight patients were more likely to have foul-smelling breath. “This finding should hold for the general public,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “But we don’t have any scientific evidence as to why this is the case. That will be the next step.”

He surmises that the connection between obesity and bad breath could be caused by several factors. Obese people may have a diet that promotes the condition of dry mouth. Prof. Rosenberg also suggests that people who are obese may be less in tune with taking care of their mouths and bodies. “We have certainly opened a window of questions here,” says Prof. Rosenberg.

Halitosis of the Ancient World?

While widespread obesity is a modern invention, bad breath is not. The phenomenon goes back thousands of years.

Says Prof. Rosenberg, “I have read reports of bad breath in ancient Egypt.  In ancient Rome there was a man named Cosmos who sold breath-freshening agents.  Bad breath is frequently mentioned in Jewish scripture  The Talmud stating that if you were a ‘Cohen’ (a priest) you couldn’t perform holy duties on the Temple if your breath was bad.

“If you were a newlywed groom, you could annul a marriage if on your wedding night you discovered that your wife has bad breath. In ancient times, we learn, bad breath was considered a ‘no-no,’ as bad as having leprosy.”

Self-Examination Not a Possibility

The problem remains today. Bad breath — and the fear that you might have it — plagues millions of people because it isn’t easy for one to check one’s own breath. Indeed, nine people in the study were unaware of their bad breath.

Says Prof. Rosenberg, who co-edits the Journal of Breath Research, “I can’t go out into the world and smell everybody’s breath, and quite frankly I’ve already smelled many thousands of cases. My goal now is to give people a list of the potential factors that could lead to this condition, so they can treat themselves.” Obesity is now added to the list, which includes dry mouth, poor dental hygiene, and possibly even the morning cup of coffee.

“You should tell people in your family if they have bad breath,” says Prof. Rosenberg. “It is curable in almost all instances, and it can be a sign of disease. As for work colleagues, they might be happy for the advice, but they might not.”

And don’t be embarrassed if it happens to you, he adds. Even professors of dentistry and experts in the field of bad breath sometimes have malodorous mouths.

Tel Aviv University (2007, December 14). Overweight People More Likely To Have Bad Breath, Study Finds. ScienceDaily.

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