Posts Tagged ‘alcohol-free mouthwash’

Best and Worst Hors D’oeuvres for a Party

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

Cut sausage and cold boiled pork with vegetablesThe New Year’s celebrations are over, the ball dropped; you’ve celebrated with your family and friends. Whether or not you’re already planning another party anytime soon, you pretty much know what to expect: Uncle Mike is walking around with a martini in his hand, and friend of a friend Suzy – who you’ve never liked – is bumping into people with her bad breath. She’s exhaling all over guests since she has that loud, guttural laugh. If you’re hosting a party or bringing any of the appetizers, be sure to cook foods that don’t worsen breath or reputations. Besides, alcohol and certain foods don’t mix. Discover the best and worst hors d’oeuvres to serve at a party – keep these in mind for next year’s shindig.

Worst hors d’oeuvres to serve

1. Garlicky bruschetta: Tasty, easy-to-make, perfect for any party, right? Wrong. These little tomato bread bites are something you won’t want to smell on your neighbor’s breath later in the night.

2. Cipollini onions braised in red wine: Despite being a Food Network favorite, this classy app is another bad breath offender. They are delicious, but only if you don’t want a kiss when the ball drops.

“Unfortunately, brushing after you eat onions or garlic doesn’t help,” Richard Price, dentist and spokesperson for the American Dental Association, explained to WebMD. “The volatile substances they contain make their way into your blood stream and travel to your lungs, where you breathe them out.”

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Get a Blindingly White, Celebrity-worthy Teeth

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

ist_000000361485Hugh Jackman. Emma Stone. Halle Berry. (Hallelujah, she’s got a smile). You name it, all these celebrities have picture-perfect teeth, which many of us seek to emulate. But what’s the best natural way to do whiten your smile? Teeth-whitening? Dedicated brushing after every meal? That’s a start.

A lot of celebrities have porcelain veneers, razor-thin strips of porcelain that are bonded over the front and sides of the original teeth, yet this cosmetic makeover can run anywhere from $1,000 to $2,500 per tooth. It’s ridiculously high, and most people don’t want to shell out the money unless they’re looking for a lone sparkling-white front tooth. In fact, they were not even created for the average working man or woman. The porcelain veneers were invented in the 1930s by a California dentist who wanted to improve the smiles for actors and actresses on stage and in front of the cameras in Hollywood.

But even if you aren’t casted for Transformers 7, is there a way to brighten that beautiful smile?

Best ways to get healthy white teeth

Like the celebrities, you likely want to show off that smile when you can.

Brush before breakfast
When we sleep, saliva production slows and plaque and bacteria starts to form on our teeth. When you brush after breakfast, the acids from sugary food multiply bacteria levels in your mouth. That’s why it’s important to brush prior to breakfast – not to mention to getting rid of morning breath. In addition, brushing too soon after the meals may be counter-productive. Acids from food weaken tooth enamel, so wait 30 minutes before brushing in order to avoid scraping the enamel off.

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Ad Council Campaign Successful in First Year

Friday, October 11th, 2013

dental hygiene productsOne year ago, the Ad Council and the Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives announced a campaign to encourage parents to promote good oral hygiene habits in their children. The Kids’ Healthy Mouths campaign received more than $33 million in free ad time and space donations from TV, print, outdoor and digital media outlets. The widespread publicity of the campaign urged parents to encourage their children to brush twice a day for two minutes to avoid tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath.

The motto, ”2min2x,” is used to encourage kids to take precautionary efforts to avoid painful procedures in the future. Preventative measures, like brushing every day, using alcohol-free mouthwash and flossing, can even make it easier for kids to go to the dentist, as they won’t have to fear cavity treatments.

According to the Ad Council study conducted one year after the start of the campaign, more than 50 percent of parents said they had heard or seen the PSAs.

The survey noted a significant increase in the number of parents who reported that their child brushes at least twice a day, compared with prior to the start of the campaign. Specifically, the study showed that 55 percent of English speaking parents, up from 48 percent; and 77 percent of Spanish speaking parents, up from 69 percent, reported better routines since 2012.

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Your Alcohol-free Mouthwash need not Turn Your Urine Blue

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Occasionally, the need for an alcohol-free mouthwash may send you searching through popular health blogs in the hopes of finding a product that will clear up your bad breath. Well, search no more, because TheraBreath offers a number of alcohol-free rinses that can neutralize odor and clean the mouth, all without harsh chemicals.

And if you think synthetic chemical are never marketed as halitosis solutions anymore, just look at how often photodynamic therapy for bad breath, or “blue light therapy,” appears in headlines. This treatment, which is totally unnecessary for eliminating oral odor, uses a chemical that can turn your urine and eye whites blue.

What is photodynamic therapy?

Most recently, an article published by the UK’s Daily Mail discussed using such a treatment for halitosis. In a piece that also touched on using “light therapy” for such conditions as epilepsy, cancer, stroke and stomach ulcers, halitosis stands out a bit. And the article uses a photo of a house lamp to illustrate “harnessing the power of light.” Hopefully your skepticism has been aroused.

As it turns out, so-called blue light treatments for halitosis are based on photodynamic therapy (PT), a century-old medical practice that uses photosensitizing chemicals (plus a narrow spectrum of light wavelengths) to kill pathogens or fight disease.

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To Avoid a Breathalyzer Mix-up, use an Alcohol-free Mouthwash for Your Bad Breath

Monday, February 27th, 2012

So here’s an odd little conundrum: If you’d like to have sweet-smelling breath the next time you’re pulled over, it’s highly advisable that you use mouthwash every day. (After all, you can’t predict when you’ll be stopped by cops, unless you’re planning on speeding.) However, unless you use an alcohol-free mouthwash, there is a chance that your anti-halitosis regimen can land you a DUI charge.

This is true no matter what country you live in, as evidenced by a recent article in the Hong Kong Standard. The piece pointed out that in India, the odds of this happening are especially tilted, since police officers there often use their noses to diagnose drunkenness, rather than utilizing a breathalyzer.

Why would Indian cops use their sniffers instead of a finely calibrated machine?  ”If we start checking each of them with sensors, it will lead to traffic snarls on the road,” one officer explained to the news source.

Still, even in the U.S., where breathalyzers set the standard for DUI evidence collection, any driver who doesn’t use a specialty, alcohol-free mouthwash runs the risk, however slight, of getting hauled in for boozing that they didn’t have the pleasure of actually experiencing.

The ability of alcohol-based mouthwashes to register on a breathalyzer is no myth. Studies in journals like the aptly titled Alcohol and Alcoholism show that recent use of an alcohol-based mouthrinse can easily mimic a blood-alcohol content above 0.08.

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