Memorial Day Sale at TheraBreath!

May 19th, 2014

memorial day sale

Hi there,

Memorial Day is only a week away. Along with being a three-day weekend, it’s also the unofficial start to summer and a time to break out the barbeques and sunscreen. Hot dogs and hamburgers almost always are on the Memorial Day menu and while they are delicious, they can also cause bad breath. Nitrites in hot dogs and the onions and garlic you might add into your hamburger patties for extra flavor can produce some nasty odors in your mouth – you can read more about that here.

Don’t let BBQ breath ruin your holiday! Stock up on TheraBreath’s bad-breath-busting products during our Memorial Day Sale. From now until May 26, get 15% off your order of $49 or more PLUS free shipping! All you have to do is enter coupon code AMEM4 during checkout.*

Shop now and save on all of our products – no exclusions! That means whether you just need some on-the-go products like gum or lozenges or need to stock up on oral rinse and toothpaste, you’ll save 15% and get free shipping.

Going somewhere for the long weekend? Be sure to grab our travel size oral rinses and toothpastes so you can have fresh breath wherever you are.

Have a happy and safe Memorial Day!

* Offer valid on orders shipped to the US and Canada only. Offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Offer expires at 11:59pm PDT May 26, 2014.

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Bad Breath Triggered by Colds

May 17th, 2014

bad breath cold pnd

In the thick of cold and flu season, getting sick can come with an odorous side effect: bad breath.

It’s already difficult to detect your own foul breath, and when your nose becomes clogged, it becomes even trickier. However, I have talked to a handful of spouses who can tell that their loved one is getting sick based on the stench of their exhalations.

There are several ways breath gets fouled by a cold. Most of the time, the culprit is a combination of post-nasal drip and cough, according to experts at the Colgate Oral and Dental Health Resource Center. When an individual catches a cold, the body quickly begins to expel foreign matter – in this case, bacteria or viruses – through mucus production. The yellowish mucus, which normally runs out the front of your nose in the form of runny nose, now thickens and drips down the back of the throat. With this mucus building in the back of the throat, the mouth becomes a breeding ground for halitosis.

Congestion can also spur another issue. When we have a stuffy nose, we tend to sleep with our mouth open, which severely dries the palate and causes repugnant morning breath. Doctors point out that inhaling and exhaling this zaps the mouth of saliva - typically a natural cleaning agent – and makes your breath susceptible to odor-causing sulfuric bacteria. During colds, a dry mouth harbors these smelly bacteria on the tongue, gums and cheek.

Furthermore, a cough complicates cold-related halitosis. Since the reflex occurs when the throat and lungs are exposed to irritants, post-nasal drip can play a role in triggering it. Coughing not only drags up stale, ammonia-smelling air from the lungs, but also continues to parch the throat, mouth and palate.

Other incidental aspects of being sick can worsen halitosis. Drinking thick, syrupy cough medicine can leave breath smelling bitter. Constantly eating savory foods, like chicken noodle soup, may create a film of oil on the teeth, which can result in more odor-causing bacteria.

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Athletes Upping Oral Health Game for Improved Performance

May 14th, 2014

athletes oral health

After reports from the 2012 London Olympics showed dreadful oral health among athletes, many elite performers have started learning from their mistakes. 

Dentists say athletes stand a better chance of winning if they take care of their teeth, which makes sense, since oral health may reflect overall health.

At the 2012 Games, 55 percent of athletes recruited for dental examinations had cavities, 45 percent had dental erosion and a staggering 76 percent suffered from gingivitis. Nearly half of the participants had not seen a dentist within the previous year. With such a dismal oral health track record, roughly 4 out of 10 athletes said they were bothered by the condition of their mouths, many complaining that it had hindered their training and performance.

At this elite level of play, the margin between winning or losing is so minute that even a small improvement could mean standing on the podium versus going home empty-handed.

Earlier this year at the Sochi Winter Games, Olympians took the advice in stride. There were several dental clinics located in the Olympic Winter Games facilities, where about 600 athletes, officials and coaches visited for screenings, routine dental care – including cavity treatments - and emergency care.

“Maintaining good oral health and hygiene is a critical part of an athlete’s overall health regimen and, in turn, their effectiveness,” Dr. Tony Clough, a consultant during the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, explained to the source. “Surprisingly, however, there are a lot of elite athletes that lack access to care and preventative products.”

Dentists point out that tooth pain can disrupt sleep and inflammation of the gums could impact the rest of the body, worsening performance. But it’s not unheard of for poor oral health to have larger effects. According to the National Institutes of Health, an unhealthy mouth is linked to Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular problems.

Success story 
The boxing team from Great Britain has been improving their oral health as of late, with doctors and dentists looking after athletes’ teeth and gums. The boxers are now receiving regular dental checkups, and brushing and flossing regularly to fight off gingivitis and dental caries (cavities).

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Dry Mouth During Menopause

May 12th, 2014

dry mouth during menopause

During menopause, many women suffer from dry mouth, a symptom that’s exactly what it sounds like: having a sticky, dry feeling in the mouth. While everyone has a dry mouth once in a while from being nervous or stressed out, dry mouth in middle-aged or older women is likely brought on by a change in hormone levels. The condition may cause trouble chewing, tasting or speaking, and though these symptoms sound alarming, rest assured that they can often be alleviated.

Explaining dry mouth
As a woman enters menopause, her body’s endocrine system undergoes a dramatic shift that results in a drop in estrogen and progesterone, according to health experts. These fluctuating hormone levels impact the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and postmenopausal women with a persistent feeling of dryness in the mouth.

In all its forms, dry mouth is triggered by the lack of saliva. Saliva plays a bigger role in oral hygiene than you might think, as it works to moisten our mouths and wash away food debris from meals. Think of it as a natural cleansing agent – controlling bacteria and protecting the teeth against plaque buildup.

Yet without enough saliva, the mouth turns into a breeding ground for bacteria. Not only can dry mouth cause discomfort along with bad breath, it can also increase your risk for gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and other mouth infections, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. What’s more, your body might not be getting the nutrients it needs if you cannot chew and swallow certain foods properly.

According to a study from the National Institute of Health, roughly 20 percent of people experience dry mouth, medically known as xerostamia. In menopausal women, estrogen levels fall and, in turn, reduce the moisture in the mucus membranes lining the mouth and nose.

Burning mouth syndrome
Some people complain of burning in the mouth too, since the nerve endings become more sensitive. Menopause may also lead to burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a frustrating condition that results in a burning sensation in the tongue, lips and mouth. While it is a very rare problem, the main demographic who grapples with it is middle-aged to older women.

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National Smile Month

May 7th, 2014

national smile month

Our neighbors across the pond are celebrating National Smile Month from May 19 to June 19. As the largest and longest-running oral health campaign in the U.K., National Smile Month seeks to heighten awareness about vital oral health issues such as cavities and gum disease, and while they might be some 3,000 miles away, the power of a smile can go a long way.

For the majority of Americans and Brits, one’s teeth is the first thing they notice when meeting someone. According to a British study, white teeth can make you look 20 percent more attractive and up to 16 percent employable. They can also chip five years off of how old you look. First impressions are everything, and your smile has an instant impact on those around you.

The mouth-body connection
Beyond the sheer appearance of your pearly whites, the mouth is considered the gateway to the body. What foods you eat, beverages you drink and chemicals you smoke enter the mouth to affect the system as a whole. Research has shown that rotten oral health is connected to an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, Type 2 diabetes and complications during pregnancy. In one study published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with serious gum disease were 40 percent more likely to have a chronic condition.

So, what comes to mind when you think of poor oral health? Yellow teeth, gap smile and rancid bad breath. While that’s certainly the epitome of things, there are many more common problems that we tend to overlook – and many more people suffer from them than you may think.

You wouldn’t ignore a bleeding foot, so why ignore bleeding gums? Puffy, red and bleeding gums can be a sign of gum disease. On a basic level, the condition is attributed to plaque building up along the gum line, which irritates the tissues and erodes dental enamel. As it progresses, the gums become inflamed, a condition known as gingivitis.

If plaque is not removed with regular brushing and dental appointments, it will harden into what is called tartar – and only a dentist can get rid of it. In the most severe cases, tartar buildup may lead to gum recession, or periodontitis, that wears away at the jawbone and usually results in tooth loss.

Tips to maintain proper oral health
To avoid these concerns, here are the three key ingredients for a clean smile and healthy gums:

  1. Brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Read the rest of this entry »
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