If You can’t get rid of Bad Breath, can an Employer get rid of you?

April 20th, 2012

Halitosis in the workplace: It’s one of those things that can instantly put you off your lunch or, if you’re the one with the odor problem, may get you in hot water with your superiors. But can it get you fired? Should you get rid of bad breath before your boss starts toying with the idea of getting rid of you?

Unfortunately, there are no easy answers here, which is why eliminating halitosis should be a top priority. Freshen your mouth, banish bad breath and keep your superiors happy.

Of course, before federal law made it illegal to fire people for physical disabilities, it seems possible (if not likely) that a person could have been fired for having halitosis. That’s certainly the drift of the propaganda that used to be slipped into ads for ineffective mouthwashes.

Around 1930, alcohol-based mouthwashes were marketed as being the only thing standing between you and the bread lines. Here’s some choice copy from a couple of the hokier ads:

- “Get rid of halitosis – It may get you fired!”

- “You can’t blame a man for firing an employee with halitosis to hire one without it.”

- “Don’t fool yourself! Since halitosis never announces itself to the victim, you simply cannot know when you have it.”

That last bit is certainly true. Your oral odor doesn’t exactly formally introduce itself every time you get it. Instead, you have to be extra vigilant in order to notice when you’ve got halitosis. This may mean occasionally licking the back of your hand and sniffing it to see if you detect a scent.

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Studies Show Most People Have Some Sign of Gum Disease

April 17th, 2012

With 70 percent of people over the age of 36 showing signs of periodontal disease, dental professionals must consistently communicate to their patients the significance of prevention or halting gum disease in its early stages. Over the past few decades, the dentistry profession has made significant progress in eliminating cavities. However, gum disease remains a significant, but preventable and treatable health threat to the public (1, 12).

Prior to the onset of periodontal or gum disease, many patients experience gingivitis. Gingivitis represents a “mild form of gum disease” and starts as inflammation of the gums. Typically, the patient has red or swollen gums, which may bleed when the person brushes his or her teeth. Although some people may experience gum irritation, the teeth remain tightly rooted in the sockets.

Gum disease starts with the accumulation of bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria mix with mucus, food particles and other organic matter, which cause a build-up of plaque. Failure to remove plaque, by brushing and flossing, results in the material hardening into calculus or tartar. The person cannot remove tartar by brushing. The condition requires a deep cleaning by a dental hygienist or dentist.

When left untreated, gingivitis becomes progressively worse and may escalate into periodontitis. Periodontal inflammation affects the ligaments and bones, which surround the teeth and provide support. When teeth lose their support, they become loose and fall out (2).

TheraBreath recommends our PerioTherapy Oral Rinse formula, which attacks anaerobic bacteria associated with the initial stages of gum disease. Many patients combine the PerioTherapy Oral Rinse with Periotherapy toothpaste treatment and use of a Hydrofloss for a highly effective three-prong approach to preventing gum disease.

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Join TheraBreath on Pinterest

April 13th, 2012

Do you Pinterest? We do! Soon you will be able to pin our products and various other information from our site on to your own boards. Want to see what TheraBreath is up to and what we love? Follow us!

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Have a great weekend! We can’t wait to see your boards!

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Zac Efron says: To get rid of Bad Breath, Skip the Tuna and Onions

April 11th, 2012

Though he recently denied being a heartthrob, actor Zac Efron has kissed his fair share of starlets onscreen – from Vanessa Hudgens in High School Musical to, most recently, Taylor Schilling in The Loved One. The latter has a steamy bedroom scene, one that Efron said frequently made him and his co-star giggle. So what helped keep him in character? In a recent TV interview, he recounted his quest to get rid of bad breath by skipping smelly foods.

“No onions!” Efron told Access Hollywood. He added that on the day he and Schilling filmed their intimate scene, he chewed tons of gum to mask any halitosis.

Of course, regular gums may temporarily cover up oral odor, but they can’t get rid of bad breath. That’s a job for all-natural, specialty breath freshening gum like TheraBreath chewing gum or mints (such as our Mouth Wetting Lozenges or ZOX), which neutralize odor molecules even as they wet the palate.

However, Efron didn’t just avoid onions. He also steered clear of seafood, based on his experiences making a previous film.

“I had a kissing scene one time, and I ate a tuna sandwich,” he told the news source. “It was the first [scene] I had to do, and I got called out on it.”

Understandably, Efron had a hard time staying in his head.  ”It was so embarrassing,” he added. “You don’t do that, don’t be that guy!”

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Cures for Halitosis?

April 9th, 2012

As a dentist, and an oral care expert, I am constantly being asked about cures for bad breath. Some are more out-there than others. While there are many so-called cures for halitosis, are they really effective? Here are some that you might find interesting and are definitely worth noting.

I’m a big believer in using specialty breath-freshening products to bust bad breath. These include rinsing with an odor-neutralizing mouthwash, gently using a tongue scraper and having an oral probiotics regimen. But can chewing roots or herbs be a natural halitosis cure?  The notion that herbs can help cure bad breath has been around for a long time and it’s totally unfounded. Natural herbs and spices such as turmeric, coriander, mint and sage have been used for hundreds of years to freshen breath. While these flavorful fighters help to cover up bad breath, they really don’t address the bacteria that cause it. The journal Internal and Emergency Medicine states that an ancient Egyptian cure for halitosis can be found in the Eber Papyrus which dates back to 1550 BC. What was Greek physician Hippocrates’s suggestion to kill oral odor? This Father of Western Medicine suggested rinsing one’s mouth with anise, dill seeds and wine. Herbal remedies for bad breath aren’t just a thing of the past –  you can find many books at your local bookstore that recommend remedies such as eating items to freshen breath that include: celery, parsley, coriander, cabbage and carrots. The book Prescription for Herbal Healing, written by nutritional consultant Phyllis Balch, lists tea tree oil, alfalfa, cat’s claw, hawthorn and grape root to strike oral odor. Are these natural elements a cure for halitosis? While they can help take care of bad breath, long term they won’t affect the bacteria in the oral cavity, so halitosis will reoccur. The best bet to neutralize bad breath at its source it to use oral care products that address the volatile sulfur compounds that cause it. However, there’s nothing wrong with snacking on some crisp fruits and vegetables to help the process along – just be sure to brush afterwards so you don’t give oral microbes more to eat and thrive.

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