Archive for the ‘toothpaste’ Category

TheraBreath Goes to the Golden Globes

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

Well, we weren’t walking the red carpet, but we were lucky enough to take part in Connected’s Celebrity Gifting Suite Celebrating the 2011 Golden Globe Awards. The event was held at Ben Kitay Studios in Hollywood on Saturday, January 14th. Each celeb received a TheraBreath gift bag that included our TheraBreath Oral Rinse, TheraBreath Toothpaste and our Mouth Wetting Lozenges. The lozenges were a big hit and we actually found out that a few of the stars already used our products! Here are some photos, enjoy!

Rico Rodriguez of Modern Family and Raini Rodriguez of Austin & Ally and Mall Cop

Raven Goodwin of Glee and Good Luck Charlie

Morgan Saylor and Jackson Pace of Homeland

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The Science of Fluoride

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

Fluoride refers to a derivative or reduced form of the element fluorine. Fluorine exists in the earth’s crust, rocks, clay and coal. Plants, air, fresh water and ocean water containfluorine. In the United States, bodies of water have fluorine ranges from 0.1 to 12 parts per (ppm). Public health officials have added fluoride to municipal water supplies since the 1940s.

Many researchers promote the benefits of fluoride, especially in children’s formative years, for the development of strong bones and teeth. On the other end of the scale, excessive fluorine intake may cause dental fluorosis, which is pitted teeth and decay. “If it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles (1, 2, 9).”

Many studies point to the effectiveness of fluoride for maintaining healthy bone strength and teeth. Often, water fluoridation receives credit as the single most important factor, accounting for the 40 to 70 percent reduction in tooth decay among Americans (1, 2).

The History of Fluorine

Fluorine in mining. Fluorite or fluorspar contains fluoride in its natural form. Generally, fluoride compounds derive from fluorspar. Structurally, fluorine has the most stable structure of all the chemical compounds. German miners used fluorspar as a flux or solvent in ore smelting mining. The compound enables miners to use less heat to melt the ore.

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Characteristics of a Toothbrush and how to Select the Right One for You

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The toothbrush is an essential oral hygiene tool used to clean the tongue, gums and teeth.  Studies have shown that brushing one’s teeth on a regular basis, while using proper techniques will help to remove plaque from teeth.  Removing plaque prevents the build-up and calcification, which if left alone will harden into calculus or tartar (1, 4). This is why plaque removal may constitute the single most important oral health activity and prevention method to fight cavities, gingivitis and gum disease.  When used with a bead of toothpaste, the toothbrush is also an effective tool at cleaning hard-to-reach areas and removing food particles from in-between the teeth.

Toothbrush History

The history of the toothbrush goes back to ancient times.  Excavations have put the date on these instruments as far back as 3000 BC. Throughout history the toothbrush has been a variety of different materials and been used in different ways, but at the core it was there to serve one purpose which is to clean the mouth. Ancient Roman and Greek writing discussed the practice of using toothpicks to clean the teeth and mouth.  It was also been documented that ancient Babylonians used chewing sticks to clean their teeth.

Around 1600 BC, the Chinese people chewed on a twig until one end became brush-like. They would then fashion the opposite end of the stick to a point and use it to clean food particles from between teeth. Later on, in 1600 AD, China became the birthplace of the first “true bristle” toothbrush, which is an instrument made of bristle boar hairs attached to a bamboo or bone handle.

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The Science of Teeth Whitening

Monday, December 19th, 2011

With cavities and periodontal disease less of a concern, more dental patients have turned their attention to improving their overall appearance with teeth whitening. Cosmetic treatments have become the most common service requests from dental patients, with more than ten million Americans spending $1.7 billion a year on teeth whitening products and services. Teeth whitening refers to “any procedure that changes the shade and appearance of teeth without using restorative materials” (1). This includes products dispensed by dental professionals and over-the-counter products.

Studies have shown patients who feel good about their physical appearance tend to adjust to illnesses better and experience shorter recuperation times.

The semi-clear, but hard outer layer tooth surface consists of enamel, which provides protection for the dentin. In 1951, a study revealed that radioisotope-labeled hydrogen peroxide could penetrate enamel to the dentin pulp. Hydrogen peroxide makes up the main ingredient in many tooth whitening products (1, 2). Other whitening products contain carbamide peroxide.

The tooth enamel is made of hydroxyapatite crystals. The formation of microscopic hexagonal rods makes the tooth enamel porous. The teeth change color due to the penetration of staining agents into the enamel, which makes it a challenge to clean the otherwise harmless stains from the tooth surface.

Causes of Teeth Discoloration

The success of teeth whitening treatments has as much to do with the type, intensity and location of the discoloration. The diagnosis performed by the dental professional represents the most important aspect of addressing tooth discoloration issues. The dentist’s evaluation determines if the discoloration  lies in the enamel surface or is a deeper staining, which affects the tooth’s structure.

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Toothpaste

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Toothpaste Basics and Commonly Available Options

Toothpaste or dentifrice refers to a substance, such as a paste, gel or powder, used for cleaning and polishing teeth. Dentifrice is the most commonly used consumer product for maintaining the aesthetics and health of teeth in children and adults (1, 4). It has multiple functions, including removing plaque, limiting halitosis and  applying fluoride to the tooth structure.

Certain active ingredients in toothpaste also impede tooth disease and gingivitis (1, 4). Used in conjunction with a toothbrush, toothpaste enhances the mechanics of brushing, cleaning and polishing with a toothbrush and enables it to reach accessible teeth surfaces (1, 4).

The History of Toothpaste

Research suggests the ancient Egyptians began using toothpaste for oral hygiene around 5000 BC. At nearly the same time, Roman and Greek residents started using toothpaste. Around 500 BC, the populace occupying the regions of India and China also gravitated to the practice of using dentifrice. Like modern humankind, these people used the earliest forms of toothpastes for cleaning their teeth and gums, and eliminating halitosis.

The ingredients in early toothpastes differ from culture to culture. The Egyptians used a combination of  ingredients, including burnt eggshells, ox hooves’ ashes and water. Various powdered mixtures prevailed up to the early 1800s. The modern era of toothpastes began when soap was added to the product, giving it a paste form.

In the 1850s, consumers could buy toothpaste packaged in jars; Colgate started this method of packaging its product in 1873. In the 1890s, Colgate transitioned to selling toothpaste in tin/lead tubes– similar to the toothpaste dispensers used today.

In 1914, manufacturers started adding fluoride to toothpaste. During World War II, a shortage of lead/tin, and leakage of the metal alloy into toothpaste, caused a switch to plastic tubes. Soap remained an ingredient in toothpaste up to 1945. Subsequently, it was replaced with sodium lauryl sulfate.

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