Archive for the ‘toothbrush’ Category

February is National Pet Dental Month!

Friday, February 5th, 2010

pet health

February is National Pet Dental Month!  According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats allegedly have symptoms of dental disease by age three!  Beyond that, oral disease is also the most commonly diagnosed health issue for our canine and feline friends.  We may hear about bad breath in pets all the time, but that doesn’t mean that it could be caused by something serious. 

Periodontal disease has the same roots in dogs and cats as it does in people.  Bacteria from food can build up in the oral cavity, and if it’s left untreated, the bacteria cause plaque and tartar buildup on the teeth and gumline.  Over time, if the buildup is neglected, periodontitis can form, which is an irreversible condition involving gum inflammation and infection.  If the gums are inflamed, they become separated from the teeth, thus allowing bacteria to enter and attack the tooth’s root.  Furthermore, bacteria can also enter the bloodstream and venture on over to the heart, liver, kidneys, and other organs, and cause serious problems.

These are all reasons as to why it is very important to be proactive about protecting your pet’s health.  Some warning signs that you can look for in your pet are: bad breath, yellow-brown crust on the teeth, bleeding gums, changes in eating/chewing habits, pawing at the mouth, and/or depression.  These are all potential signs that the pet has an infection, and you should schedule a dental checkup as soon as you can.  If the pet is in good health, one should schedule regular veterinarian visits anyway.   A pet owner should schedule a professional cleaning to have the following done: tartar removal, cavity/growth check, diseased teeth extracted, and tooth polishing.  Tooth polishing helps prevent the formation of new plaque/tartar buildup

You should also practice regular brushing with your pet, and follow a home care regimen.  You can introduce toothpaste to your pets by using a small amount on your finger and rubbing it on their teeth.   Make sure to use a toothpaste that is specially made for cats and dogs.  The next step is to have the pet lick the bristles of a toothbrush with the toothpaste on it.  Then, you can begin brushing its teeth.  This should be done twice every week.  Don’t give up if your pet doesn’t seem willing to have its teeth brushed. 

Also, certain pet foods actually help plaque/tartar removal, so you can look for that in stores.  Ask your pet’s doctor for any advice.  Good luck and spread the word!

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Jersey Shore’s ‘The Situation’ is Against Bad Breath

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

Last week it was Simon Cowell, now this week we have yet another celebrity who has a phobia of halitosis.  We found out something that Jersey Shore resident Mike, also known as ‘The Situation’, can’t function without!  It’s not a tanning bed, the gym, or a washer/dryer– it’s a toothbrush!

According to a source, “The Situation always has a toothbrush on him. Always. Bad breath is the one thing that scares him more than pale people at the beach.”

Bad breath is just not ‘cool’, is it?

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Cure Gingivitis Before It Causes Bad Breath and Tooth Loss

Monday, February 1st, 2010

gingivitis

Gingivitis is a general term for different types of infections in the gingiva. Bad breath-causing bacteria cause gingivitis, so it is important to keep the oral cavity clean. By exercising proper oral hygiene, you can clean up any gingivitis that you have and prevent it from occuring.

You should brush at least 2-3 times a day, and it is also important that you use a decent toothpaste. PerioTherapy is excellent for those with periodontal infections. Flossing is very important because it gets rid of the plaque between the teeth. Generally, you should floss twice a day (at least once for sure) before you brush your teeth. Try using oral rinse every day (preferably twice at least), since this can reach areas that your dental floss and toothbrush do not reach. A tongue scraper will eradicate bacteria from the tongue. Also, after you use a tongue scraper and toothbrush, make sure to rinse them with hot water.

If left untreated, gingivitis can be really severe and turn into gum disease. Bleeding, swollen, and painful gums all can occur, as well as tooth loss that could allegedly lead to heart disease. If you are dedicated to curing your gingivitis and doing the right procedure, you can get rid of this oral health problem and potentially the bad breath that goes along with it. It not only depends on your dentist, but it also depends on your habits and the oral care products you use.

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Pregnant Mothers with Bad Breath May Be Fatal for Babies

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

stillbirths bad breath

Unfortunately, pregnant women with bad breath may have a problem that is staggering in its implications.  Previously, we have discussed the relationship between gum disease and reproductive health (pregnancy gingivitis), which can result in a baby being born prematurely.  Research shows that the bad breath-causing bacteria may even be linked to stillbirths.

Allegedly, the oral bacteria can be transferred to the placenta if it enters the blood stream through open sores in the gums.  The unborn child is not equipped to fight the disease with its immune system in the same manner an adult can. 

Since bleeding gums/pregnancy gingivitis is extremely common among pregnant women, it is vital that expecting mothers brush and floss frequently during the day, after snacks and meals.  Surgery may be needed for serious infections. 

Whereas pregnancy gingivitis is common, the possibility of having a stillbirth is not.  Nonetheless, taking healthy steps will make pregnancy easier and reduce anxiety levels.  Here are some tips for practicing good oral hygiene:

- Go to the dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
- Brush your teeth at least 2-3 times a day, ideally after every meal and snack.  This prevents plaque/tartar building up.
- Floss after every meal.
- Use an oral rinse (like TheraBreath) at least 2 times a day. 
- Use a tongue scraper to prevent the bad breath-causing bacteria from building up.
- Eat healthier (more vegetables, less sweets).

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New Year’s Resolution: No Bad Breath!

Monday, January 4th, 2010

new years resolutions
Happy new year everyone!  Since we all want a fresh start with the new year, why not also start with fresh breath? In order to combat bad breath, we need to know what causes it in the first place. Anaerobic bacteria exists in the biofilm that is formed on the tongue, and these bacteria break down proteins in food, resulting in the production of offensive smells due to gases like hydrogen sulphide and skatol.

Here are some tips to help avoid halitosis this new year:

1) Proper oral hygiene. One should gargle with lukewarm water after eating, even if it’s just a snack. Brushing should be done 2-3 times a day, and you should also use floss and a tongue scraper. Add TheraBreath to your daily regimen.
2) Proper brushing techniques. Avoid brushing too vigorously, as this does damage to the gums. Excessive brushing can damage tooth enamel. Try to brush the upper teeth in a downward direction, and the lower teeth in a upward direction.
3) Tooth picks
4) Food habits. Some foods that people eat are certainly smellier than others. Sometimes they say “an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but a raw onion a day keeps everybody away.” Also, try to maintain regularity in food timing.
5) Water intake. Keep hydrated to maintain a stable level of saliva.
6) Natural fresheners. Try spices like clove, cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, and cumin seed. Citrus fruits can help banish bad breath.

And if these bad breath cures do not work, try the following:
1) Remove the underlying cause. Get checked out for general and systemic diseases like gastric disorders, diabetes, fevers, liver diseases, etc. If you have an infection, antibiotics, antifungal and antiviral medicines can help. You may even want to try saliva-producing tablets.
2) Get regular dental checkups and cleanings. If you have caries, make sure they get filled.
3) Tonsillectomies can help if you have recurrent tonsilitis.
4) Homeopathy. In this case, medicines are selected based on the physical, mental, social, and emotional characteristics of a person.
5) Psychological counseling.  Sometimes chronic halitosis sufferers are very depressed and have the tendency to avoid the public. 

Good luck and happy 2010!

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