Archive for the ‘toothbrush’ Category

6 Back-to-school Tips for Kids’ Oral Health

Friday, August 29th, 2014

 

oral health back to school

School is right around the corner. And that means preparing your youngster for class, buying new books and making sure he or she looks presentable - that includes oral hygiene. No one wants to show up on the first day with bad breath, so check out these simple back-to-school tips. 

1. Swap toothbrushes
The start of school is a great time to for your child to ditch his or her old, summer-scuffed toothbrush for a new one. Dentists recommend getting a new toothbrush every two to three months. Otherwise, bad bacteria and food particles can cause microbes to grow on bristles and handles. If your kid has an electric toothbrush, swap heads – and make sure they clean the handle, too.

2. Instill brushing and flossing into their routine
In the morning routine, your kids can start the day off right by brushing and flossing their teeth. Scrubbing your chompers will get rid of morning breath while flossing can detach food debris from those hard-to-reach places. Everyone’s supposed to brush their teeth for two minutes, twice a day. If 120 seconds feels like an eternity to your little one, tell them to hum their favorite song while brushing – whether it’s Beyonce, Justin Timberlake or Sam Smith, it’ll likely get them to clean a little bit longer.

Don’t forget a nighttime scrub! Dental experts say brushing habits that children develop between the ages of 4 to 14 affect the way they’ll brush for the rest of their lives.

3. Invest in mouthwash
Say goodbye to bad breath with alcohol-free mouthwash. Ingredients in mouthwash bind to the surface of germs and cause them to burst, which helps reduce buildup on teeth and gums. Avoid mouthwash that contains alcohol, as it actually dries out the mouth, which can lead to stinky breath.

4. Eat a balanced breakfast
We hear that phrase a lot in cereal commercials – “a balanced breakfast.” Yet most people skip the fruits and head straight for the box of sugary cereal. A healthy morning meal contains a mix of complex carbohydrates and protein to fuel your child until lunch. You can pair more nutritious whole-grain breakfast cereals or whole-wheat toast with a protein source such as milk, yogurt, eggs, peanut butter or cheese. Add an apple, orange or banana to the mix and your child will have a truly balanced meal.
(more…)

No Comments Yet »

Get a Blindingly White, Celebrity-worthy Teeth

Thursday, October 24th, 2013

ist_000000361485Hugh Jackman. Emma Stone. Halle Berry. (Hallelujah, she’s got a smile). You name it, all these celebrities have picture-perfect teeth, which many of us seek to emulate. But what’s the best natural way to do whiten your smile? Teeth-whitening? Dedicated brushing after every meal? That’s a start.

A lot of celebrities have porcelain veneers, razor-thin strips of porcelain that are bonded over the front and sides of the original teeth, yet this cosmetic makeover can run anywhere from $1,000 to $2,500 per tooth. It’s ridiculously high, and most people don’t want to shell out the money unless they’re looking for a lone sparkling-white front tooth. In fact, they were not even created for the average working man or woman. The porcelain veneers were invented in the 1930s by a California dentist who wanted to improve the smiles for actors and actresses on stage and in front of the cameras in Hollywood.

But even if you aren’t casted for Transformers 7, is there a way to brighten that beautiful smile?

Best ways to get healthy white teeth

Like the celebrities, you likely want to show off that smile when you can.

Brush before breakfast
When we sleep, saliva production slows and plaque and bacteria starts to form on our teeth. When you brush after breakfast, the acids from sugary food multiply bacteria levels in your mouth. That’s why it’s important to brush prior to breakfast – not to mention to getting rid of morning breath. In addition, brushing too soon after the meals may be counter-productive. Acids from food weaken tooth enamel, so wait 30 minutes before brushing in order to avoid scraping the enamel off.

(more…)

1 Comment »

Characteristics of a Toothbrush and how to Select the Right One for You

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The toothbrush is an essential oral hygiene tool used to clean the tongue, gums and teeth.  Studies have shown that brushing one’s teeth on a regular basis, while using proper techniques will help to remove plaque from teeth.  Removing plaque prevents the build-up and calcification, which if left alone will harden into calculus or tartar (1, 4). This is why plaque removal may constitute the single most important oral health activity and prevention method to fight cavities, gingivitis and gum disease.  When used with a bead of toothpaste, the toothbrush is also an effective tool at cleaning hard-to-reach areas and removing food particles from in-between the teeth.

Toothbrush History

The history of the toothbrush goes back to ancient times.  Excavations have put the date on these instruments as far back as 3000 BC. Throughout history the toothbrush has been a variety of different materials and been used in different ways, but at the core it was there to serve one purpose which is to clean the mouth. Ancient Roman and Greek writing discussed the practice of using toothpicks to clean the teeth and mouth.  It was also been documented that ancient Babylonians used chewing sticks to clean their teeth.

Around 1600 BC, the Chinese people chewed on a twig until one end became brush-like. They would then fashion the opposite end of the stick to a point and use it to clean food particles from between teeth. Later on, in 1600 AD, China became the birthplace of the first “true bristle” toothbrush, which is an instrument made of bristle boar hairs attached to a bamboo or bone handle.

(more…)

1 Comment »

The Tooth Brush Debate – Hard or Soft?

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Have you ever taken a stroll down the toothbrush aisle and noticed all of the choices one has to make? There are toothbrushes of all shapes, sizes, colors and hardness. Toothbrushes range from hard to soft, but in recent years, “hard” or “firm” tooth brushes have become scarcer.

Why is this? Well just because you are using a hard toothbrush doesn’t mean you are doing your gums and teeth any favors. In fact, you may be damaging them more than taking care of them. Dr. Katz recommends a supersoft toothbrush.  This is much less damaging on gums and allows you to brush much more thoroughly. It is important to do a thorough job when brushing your teeth, but make sure you are doing it gently and angling the toothbrush towards your gumline.

By brushing 2-3 times a day with a soft toothbrush and doing a gentle, yet thorough job, you will be taking the best care of your teeth and gums without doing any damage that a firm toothbrush might do.

So don’t be fooled by all the expensive toothbrushes with the bells and whistles. Use a simple, high quality supersoft toothbrush and put in the time (3 full minutes) to brush your teeth and gums properly.

No Comments Yet »

Random Dental Health Facts

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

bad breath

Babies are not born with caries-forming bacteria.  They only get it directly if someone blows on food before feeding it to the baby, or if someone kisses the baby and germs get in the mouth.

One of the main sweetening agents in toothpaste, Saccharine Sodium, is actually 500 times sweeter than sugar!  This is not in TheraBreath’s toothpaste.

If you have a cold, sore throat, or some type of infection, make sure to replace your toothbrush.  Bacteria can live on them and proliferate, possibly leading to reinfection.

Try to keep your toothbrush at least 6 feet away from where you brush.  Airborne bacteria from a flush can travel up to 6 feet. 

The year the most popular carbonated drink was launched, there was a massive surge of patients with tooth decay.

Children below 5 years of age should be given non-fluoridated toothpastes, because it can be harmful to swallow too much fluoride. 

Replacing the cap on a toothpaste tube after brushing your teeth allegedly helps bacteria proliferate.

Brushing your teeth too fast or hard can contribute to the problem of enamel erosion, which causes teeth sensitivity, tooth decay, and other oral health problems.

Source: dentalhealthsite.com

No Comments Yet »