Archive for the ‘research’ Category

International Study Broadens Benefits of BLIS K12 Probiotics

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TheraBreath’s own BLIS K12 probiotics got a bit of a boost this year, as a recently published study has confirmed that the specialty breath freshener has even more benefits than once thought. The report found that this particular brand of probiotic treatment may prevent oral candidiasis by keeping its pathogens from sticking to the walls of the mouth.

Not bad for a product that already modifies the flora of the mouth, eliminates bad bacteria, neutralizes bad breath and leaves the mouth smelling sweet!

What can’t probiotics do?

This latest investigation was conducted by researchers from Canada, Japan and New Zealand. The results – which appeared in the January issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology – indicated that BLIS K12 probiotics keep yeast from taking hold in the mouth.

Oral candidiasis, also known as thrush, is a painful condition caused by a fungal infection of the mouth. This disorder is pretty easy to notice: Besides causing rank bad breath, thrush also leaves the tongue coated in a startling shade of white. Many people with the condition appear to have a mouthful of cottage cheese.

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New Research Confirms SLS in Toothpaste can Aggravate Cold Sores

Monday, May 2nd, 2011

When we do the daily routine of brushing, rinsing and flossing at least twice a day, we all have a common goal: a healthy mouth and teeth. However, one specific ingredient in your oral care products may actually be hurting your oral health rather than helping it.

Do you suffer from cold or canker sores? Then you may want to check the ingredients in your toothpaste. Research done by clinical professor of oral biology at the University of California, Los Angeles, Fariba Younai recently gave a talk that discussed sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) – a common ingredient in many toothpastes.  Dr. Younai’s research shows that SLS can increase the chances of chronic aphthous ulcers (cold sores) for people with less than perfect immune systems.

What is SLS? It’s a surfactant which is a type of foaming or wetting agent found in many of your common toothpastes. It creates the foaming action while you brush with the toothpaste. However, this foam is only to make the user think that the product is more effective, it actually doesn’t have any added benefit – actually the converse. Past studies have noted that SLS can irritate the walls of the inner cheeks, gums and underside of lips where the toothpaste has the most contact with skin.

Dr. Younai suggested the use of TheraBreath toothpaste amongst the recommended brands that are SLS-free. TheraBreath toothpaste does not contain SLS and will not have the same risk of sores developing in the interior of the mouth – just another benefit of using TheraBreath products. Not only do they keep your breath fresh, you also won’t have to worry about dealing with constant and reoccurring painful cold sores.

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Mice Look for Bad Breath in Their Peers

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Mice have a fairly simple life. Their main goals are to eat, survive, and procreate – if only we had it so easy! While mice are seemingly basic creatures, a new study published in the journal Current Biology shows that mice may be more intelligent in selecting their meals than previously thought – they use halitosis!

Past studies showed that rodents do use their noses to decide what to eat when around peers, they just couldn’t figure out how. This new study by US, German and Russian physiologists and neurobiologists finds that mice determine their meal choices based on the bad breath and sulfuric chemicals on the breath of other mice. Mice have a GC-D necklace subsystem (a subset of the olfactory system) that can detect chemicals on mouse breath. This allows mice to identify if a food source is safe or not.

The chemical mice can detect is carbon disulfide. Bad breath in humans is usually composed of similar sulfur-based molecules including hydrogen sulfide (which smells like rotting eggs) and dimethyl sulfide (which smells like cabbage).

The research team found that mice that do not smell carbon disulfide on other mice will not change their eating habits. However, mice that do find the stinky smell will alter their meals choices. Even mice don’t want to have bad breath!

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