Archive for the ‘“pregnancy gingivitis”’ Category

Starting the Conversation Regarding Pregnancy and Oral Health Care

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

914398_40100404The importance of one’s oral health is gaining attention from the media after recent studies noted more evidence that Alzheimer’s disease and poor oral hygiene are linked. Led by the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry, the study found bacteria in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients that could have stemmed from the same bacteria that cause bad breath, gum disease and tooth decay. But the association between oral health and overall wellbeing doesn’t end there. According to the August 2013 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, proper care of the teeth and gums is pertinent for pregnant women. The Committee Opinion piece published in the journal urges gynecologists to discuss oral health with patients for the health of themselves and their babies.

Between 2007 and 2009, 56 percent of women did not seek oral health checkups during pregnancy, and cost could play a role. Access to proper dental care procedures and treatments may have prevented some from visiting the dentist during this important time in their lives. Although there is no solid evidence that associates proper oral care with pregnancy issues, concerns still arise based on the potential of transmission of bacteria from mother to infants. A 1996 study found an association between periodontal disease and pre-term birth; however, large trials have not proved this conclusion.

It’s also likely that pregnancy can cause oral health issues, such as gum disease and tooth decay, due to an increased inflammatory response, greater consumption of acidic and sugary food and drink, and the teeth’s exposure to gastric acid from morning sickness. Pregnancy gingivitis, benign oral gingival lesions, tooth erosion, tooth mobility, dental caries and periodontitis are all common conditions in pregnant women.

According to the authors, “for many women, obstetrician-gynecologists are the most frequently accessed health care professional, which creates a unique opportunity to educate women throughout their lifespan, including during pregnancy, about the importance of dental care and good oral hygiene.”

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Mouthwash: A Tip for a Full Term Pregnancy

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Did you think that mouthwash was just for your oral health? A new study conducted suggests that rinsing with mouthwash while pregnant (for mothers that have gum disease) have more of a chance of carrying a baby to full term. This study was published by Reuters Health and states a fact that we often discuss: pregnant women with periodontal disease tend to have more premature babies than women with healthy gums. Why? We’re still not sure (even after this study) however, it is known that rinsing regularly with an alcohol-free mouthwash (like any of TheraBreath’s Oral Rinses) may cut a woman’s risk of delivering early by almost 75%! Isn’t it worth trying?

The research term in this study asked 71 pregnant women with gum disease to gargle twice daily with an alcohol-free mouthwash. The team then compared the number of preemies with a group of 155 pregnant women who also had gum disease that only gargled with water. For the water only group, one in five (34 moms total) gave birth early – meaning before 35 weeks of pregnancy. Of the 71  others that rinsed with mouthwash, only 4 moms gave birth early (about one in five).

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Gingivitis During Pregnancy

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

During pregnancy, a woman’s body goes through various (if not dramatic) changes: back aches, swelling of the feet and ankles, random food cravings, and more.

With all that is going on with your body and all of the planning required to welcome this new little one into the world, I bet that your teeth and gums are probably the last thing on your mind.

However, did you know that the hormonal changes your body is experiencing during pregnancy can lead to “Pregnancy Gingivitis”?

If you already have gingivitis going into pregnancy, this condition is likely to get worse without proper gum care. Pregnant women that have gum disease are also six times more likely to have a baby that is premature or has a low-birth weight. (more…)

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Pregnant Mothers with Bad Breath May Be Fatal for Babies

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

stillbirths bad breath

Unfortunately, pregnant women with bad breath may have a problem that is staggering in its implications.  Previously, we have discussed the relationship between gum disease and reproductive health (pregnancy gingivitis), which can result in a baby being born prematurely.  Research shows that the bad breath-causing bacteria may even be linked to stillbirths.

Allegedly, the oral bacteria can be transferred to the placenta if it enters the blood stream through open sores in the gums.  The unborn child is not equipped to fight the disease with its immune system in the same manner an adult can. 

Since bleeding gums/pregnancy gingivitis is extremely common among pregnant women, it is vital that expecting mothers brush and floss frequently during the day, after snacks and meals.  Surgery may be needed for serious infections. 

Whereas pregnancy gingivitis is common, the possibility of having a stillbirth is not.  Nonetheless, taking healthy steps will make pregnancy easier and reduce anxiety levels.  Here are some tips for practicing good oral hygiene:

– Go to the dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
– Brush your teeth at least 2-3 times a day, ideally after every meal and snack.  This prevents plaque/tartar building up.
– Floss after every meal.
– Use an oral rinse (like TheraBreath) at least 2 times a day. 
– Use a tongue scraper to prevent the bad breath-causing bacteria from building up.
– Eat healthier (more vegetables, less sweets).

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Gingivitis (a Major Cause of Bad Breath) May Be Genetic

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

gingivitis

More people than you may think have gingivitis–up to half of the U.S. population.  Some people do not even realize that they have it, and they might have common symptoms like bad breath, and/or swollen, red and bleeding gums.  Gingivitis can cause complications like heart disease, pre-term birth, and diabetes if it is not treated.  Most of the time, people think it is caused by a lack of proper oral hygiene or the hormonal changes that occur during a woman’s pregnancy (pregnancy gingivitis). 

A new study, on the other hand, shows that genetics actually can play a major part in the onset and healing of gum disease.  The goal of this study was to pinpoint various changes on a molecular level during the onset and healing processes of the disease.  Research showed that ~30% of the human body’s genes are expressed differently during the formation and healing of gingivitis.  How one reacts to gingivitis depends greatly on how the body’s immune system is activated.  The findings of the study enabled scientists to identify certain biological pathways activated by the onset and remediation of gingivitis, including energy metabolism, immunity response, neural processes, vasculature, chemotaxis, steroid metabolism and wound healing.  The information gathered from this study should certainly help scientists and doctors come up with better cures for gingivitis.

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