Archive for the ‘Pet Oral Care’ Category

Bird Bad Breath

Friday, July 10th, 2009

Does Your Bird Have Bad Breath?

Thus far, our posts have mentioned dogs and cats having bad breath…but never have we discussed bad bird breath.  As someone who is a bird owner and avid bird fan, I thought it was necessary.  Birds can have bad breath!

If a bird has bad breath, that is almost always the sign of a bacteria infection, and it needs to see an avian veterinarian.  Generally, foul breath in our avian friends means that there is some abnormality in the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, or even with the oropharynx

If a bird has vitamin-A deficiency, it may be more susceptible to bacterial or yeast infections like Candida sp.  Infections like these can cause halitosis.  Also, a bird’s diet can affect its breath–so don’t give it rotten food/seed.

The bacteria that normally resides in the gastrointestinal tract (like the colon of mammals) are known as coliform bacteria.  Coliform bacteria and other bacteria are accompanied with a fecal-type odor.  If a bird is infected with one type of these bacteria, its breath (if the mouth, crop, or proventriculus has the infection) or its droppings (if the lower gastrointestinal tract has the infection) can develop a strong fecal odor.

Where Do These Bacteria Come From?

People use fertilizer frequently when growing fruits and vegetables, and this is a strong bacterial source.  Soil can also be contaminated with fecal material.  Fruits and vegetables need to be washed properly before a bird eats them, because the bird can ingest the bacteria.

Also, if a bird is in the bathroom when the toilet is flushed, the coliform bacteria can become aerosolized and breathed in by the bird.  Also, bird owners need to wash their hands after using the bathroom before handling their bird. 

Avian Gastric Yeast (AGY, formerly known as megabacteria) can be found in middle of the proventriculus and ventriculus and may also be found in other places of the gastrointestinal tract.  Unfortunately, this is hard to track in live birds, and it can be the cause of bad breath.  An ulcer in the crop, proventriculus or ventriculus that has been contaminated by bacteria can also cause bad breath.

Other Bad Breath Causes

Other gastrointestinal issues can cause halitosis, like Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD).  Spirochetes, an unusual type of organism, might cause halitosis, especially in lovebirds.  Both benign and malignant tumors in the gastrointestinal tract can also cause bad breath, especially if they erode or cause ulceration into the GI tract.  These can be diagnosed by a combination of blood work, X-rays, endoscopy, or ultrasound.  Within the GI tract, protozoal infections (i.e. trichomoniasis in the oropharynx, giardia) can be hard to diagnose and may cause bad breath.  Most protozoal infections can be treated with ronidazole. 

Treatment Plan

According to many avian vets, vinegar can by used to help acidify the interior of the proventriculus and ventriculus as well as treat many diseases, mostly in the GI tract.

If your bird has bad breath and any other symptoms, bring it to a vet and have a physical exam and work-up done.  These include: complete blood count; plasma chemistry panel; Gram’s stains of the choana, crop, and cloaca; bacterial and fungal cultures; appropriate serological tests; full-body X-rays and maybe an endoscopy.

Depending on what your avian veterinarian tells you, you can suggest a consultation with a board-certified avian specialist (some veterinary labs will offer this).  If your vet is not experienced enough, you can have them refer you to a referral center or avian specialist. 

Unlike pet mammals and humans, birds do not have teeth (aside from the single egg tooth that is not made of the structures in a mammalian tooth), meaning that the cause of bad breath in birds cannot be attributed to dental and gum disease (usually caused by a bacteria infection).  However, bacterial infections concerning the bird’s gastrointestinal tract or lungs can cause bad breath and impact its health. 

Source: Bird Channel

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Dog Breath Remedy

Monday, July 6th, 2009

Most of us have smelled dog halitosis (bad breath) at one time or another.  It is the result of the foul odor-producing bacteria buildup in a dog’s lungs, gut, or mouth.  Chronic halitosis in a dog can indicate that it needs better dental care or there is a serious issue in its gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, or liver.

Dog Breath Causes

The more common serious issues are gum (periodontal) or dental disease, and generally the smaller a dog is, the more vulnerable it is to tartar and plague.  There are more serious issues that are possible, but less common, which include more extreme medical problems in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract, organs, or respiratory system.

Diagnosing Dog Breath

One should normally bring his or her pet to the veterinarian to diagnose the reason behind the chronic bad breath.  A vet can do a physical eam and laboratory work to pinpoint the problem.  Come prepared with information on your dog’s diet, exercise routine, and behavioral habits.

When Should I Take My Dog To The Vet?

As soon as your dog’s breath has an unusual smell, bring it to the vet.  Here are some symptoms:

1.  Unusually fruity/sweet breath can signify diabetes, especially if the dog has been drinking fluids and urinating more than usual.
2.  Dog breath that smells like urine can mean kidney disease.
3.  Bad breath along with vomiting, lack of appetite, and yellow-tinged corneas and/or gums can signify a liver problem.

Dog Breath Cure

Obviously, treatment depends on the cause of dog breath.  If plaque is the cause, the dog may need a professional dental cleaning.  If diet is the cause, then you should change what your dog is eating.  If the cause of bad breath is related to gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, or lung issues, the vet should know the best route to take.

Prevent Dog Breath

Just because a dog is older does not mean that it is normal to have bad breath.  Always take action and provide the best care that you can for your pet, as a method of prevention.  Here are some good things to do:

1.  Bring the dog in for regular checkups at the vet to make sure it has no underlying medical issues.
2.  Have the vet monitor the condition of the dog’s teeth and breath.
3.  Provide the dog with a high-quality and easily digestible diet.
4.  Brush the dog’s teeth everyday if possible–or as frequently as you can if you cannot everyday.  Be sure to brush with a toothpaste made for dog’s, since toothpaste for human’s can cause digestive problems in canines.
5.  Provide safe chew toys that encourage the natural process of chewing and teeth cleaning.
6.  Research dog treats that help with breath odor.
7.  Research dog oral health products to use at home and discuss them with your vet.

Keep in mind that products designed to mask bad breath may not fix the cause of it.  Also, most of these ideas discussed can also be used for cats.

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Dogs and Cats Have Bad Breath: Oral Products for Pets

Monday, June 1st, 2009

Dog Breath

Does your dog or cat have persistent bad breath? It could mean that your best friend may have a serious problem. Periodontal disease (also known as periodontitis, gingivitis or gum disease) is the #1 disease in dogs and cats and bad breath is one sign that your pet may be suffering. Now, there is a way to attack it naturally and effectively.

Dr. Katz for Pets products bring to you and your pet 21st Century science, which fights odors generated by sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria. The basis of these revolutionary home treatments has been proven thousands of times through the use of oxygenating compounds.

Free Dr. Katz for Pets Trial and Printable Guide

Oral Health for Dogs

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Diagnose and Treat Your Cat’s Halitosis

Friday, May 1st, 2009

cat bad breath

Halitosis coming from your cat’s mouth can be unpleasant for multiple reasons. Not only is the smell unwelcoming, but it can also signify various diseases. Cat owners can buy many different products, like cat toothbrushes, toothpastes, treats and drops that help with cat breath, tartar, and other cat dental issues.

There are many underlying diseases that could be causing the smelly odor from your cat’s mouth:

  • Gingivitis, inflammation of the gums
  • Abscessed tooth/teeth
  • Bone/hairball stuck in mouth
  • Oral ulceration
  • Foreign bodies in mouth, (i.e. grass awns, plant material)
  • Tumors in mouth (oral neoplasia)
  • Lung diseases (i.e. cancer)
  • Kidney disease
  • Periodontal disease, inflammation of the tissue that surrounds the teeth

Warning signs to Look Out For:

  • Oral pain/discharge (especially if there is blood)
  • Drooling
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Difficulty eating
  • Depression

Treating Your Cat:

If you feel your cat has any of these problems, the best bet is to take it to a vet for a professional opinion. Veterinary care may involve various diagnostic tests to reveal the cause of the bad breath, which include:

  • Thorough medical history and physical examination
  • Complete oral exam (may require brief anesthetic)
  • Full-mouth X-rays with dental machine
  • Periodontal probing to identify possible periodontal diseases

Home Treatment:

Home treatments are dependent on what specific problem the cat has. Here are some prevention mechanisms you can take to help your cat’s foul-smelling breath:

  • Daily cat teeth brushing (look for special brushes/pastes available from a vet)
  • Spraying .12% chlorhexidine (prescribed from a vet) into your cat’s mouth once daily for one to two weeks.
  • Follow special dietary considerations. Get input from your vet on what works the best for your cat.
  • Diagnosis by a vet if the halitosis persists.

Source: Dr. Debra Primovic

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Dog Breath?

Monday, September 10th, 2007

It could mean that Your “best friend” may have a serious problem. Periodontal Disease is the #1 disease in dogs and bad breath is one sign that your dog may be suffering. Now, there is a way to attack it naturally and effectively. Plus, we introduce the 1st Deodorizing Shampoo for Dogs using Oxygenation which stops offensive odors, attacks fleasand ticks & soothes your dog’s coat.

Dr. Katz for Dogs products bring to you and your dog 21st Century science, which fights odors generated by sulfur-producing anaerobic bacteria. The basis of these revolutionary home treatments has been proven thousands of times through the use of oxygenating compounds.

Oral Health for Dogs
Dr. Katz’s Special Dog Shampoo
Frequently Asked Questions
Click Here to Order “Dr Katz 4 Dogs” Products

 

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