Archive for the ‘periodontitis’ Category

Secrets from Dentists

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

kids bad breath

There are many things that people may not realize regarding oral care and its relationship to overall health.  Dental health is a very important thing and should not be neglected.  Here are certain things that you may not have known about dental care and dentists:

Pay More Attention

  • Just because your mouth may not hurt, does not mean it is healthy. 
  • Your oral health can affect the rest of your body
  • People with HEALTHY gums should go to the dentist twice a year.  Most people do not.  If your gums are NOT healthy, you should go even more. 
  • People tend to brush their front teeth more, and many people have periodontal disease in their back teeth because of this
  • People tend to spend around 2-3 minutes total brushing per day, even though proper oral care requires at least ten minutes of brushing and flossing each day.  Kids tend to spend even less time than adults. 

Bad Breath

  • Chewing gum or mints is not going to cover up the smell from smoking cigarettes.  This is because the smell is deeply ingrained in the mouth and gum tissues.
  • Most dentists won’t tell you if you have halitosis unless you ask.
  • People need to floss since brushing does not go deep into the gums.  If a person brushes and flosses properly, gets regular cleanings, and STILL has bad breath, then he or she should check into diet and health complications.

Children’s Teeth

  • Dentists may secretly blame parents when their kids’ teeth go bad.
  • Cavity-causing bacteria CAN be spread from person-to-person via saliva.  This includes parents to children– if a parent tastes a baby’s food, and puts the same spoon back into the baby’s mouth, the baby is at risk.
  • Children with dental problems, like toothaches, tend to have more problems in school.
  • There’s a significant risk of infection with any kind of mouth piercing if it is not performed in a sterile environment.  Also, tongue piercings tend to chip the front teeth.

Patient Concerns

  • Having metal fillings removed can release more mercury than leaving them in.  Metal fillings are much more durable than tooth-colored fillings.
  • People are exposed to more radiation standing outside for an hour than they are when they have dental X-rays taken.
  • People are getting teeth pulled that don’t need to be just because they can’t afford to fix them.
  • Very few insurance companies cover dental implants, even though they’re better than dentures
  • Teeth that are not aligned correctly can cause migraines
  • Bleeding gums is one of the first signs of diabetes
  • Did you know that teeth get whiter when they dry out?  If you go to the dentist to get your teeth whitened, and your mouth is left open for an hour, the teeth could be two shades whiter from dehydration alone. 
  • Cosmetic dentistry only works in a healthy mouth.  Always treat your gum disease first.
  • When you go to the dentist, check to see if the magazines in the waiting area are up-to-date…this shows if they pay attention to detail.

Here is an interesting quote by dentist Damian Dachowski: “When someone meets you for the first time, the first thing they notice is eyes. Second is teeth, and third is hair. But people spend way more money on their hair than their teeth.”

Source: Reader’s Digest

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February is National Pet Dental Month!

Friday, February 5th, 2010

pet health

February is National Pet Dental Month!  According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats allegedly have symptoms of dental disease by age three!  Beyond that, oral disease is also the most commonly diagnosed health issue for our canine and feline friends.  We may hear about bad breath in pets all the time, but that doesn’t mean that it could be caused by something serious. 

Periodontal disease has the same roots in dogs and cats as it does in people.  Bacteria from food can build up in the oral cavity, and if it’s left untreated, the bacteria cause plaque and tartar buildup on the teeth and gumline.  Over time, if the buildup is neglected, periodontitis can form, which is an irreversible condition involving gum inflammation and infection.  If the gums are inflamed, they become separated from the teeth, thus allowing bacteria to enter and attack the tooth’s root.  Furthermore, bacteria can also enter the bloodstream and venture on over to the heart, liver, kidneys, and other organs, and cause serious problems.

These are all reasons as to why it is very important to be proactive about protecting your pet’s health.  Some warning signs that you can look for in your pet are: bad breath, yellow-brown crust on the teeth, bleeding gums, changes in eating/chewing habits, pawing at the mouth, and/or depression.  These are all potential signs that the pet has an infection, and you should schedule a dental checkup as soon as you can.  If the pet is in good health, one should schedule regular veterinarian visits anyway.   A pet owner should schedule a professional cleaning to have the following done: tartar removal, cavity/growth check, diseased teeth extracted, and tooth polishing.  Tooth polishing helps prevent the formation of new plaque/tartar buildup

You should also practice regular brushing with your pet, and follow a home care regimen.  You can introduce toothpaste to your pets by using a small amount on your finger and rubbing it on their teeth.   Make sure to use a toothpaste that is specially made for cats and dogs.  The next step is to have the pet lick the bristles of a toothbrush with the toothpaste on it.  Then, you can begin brushing its teeth.  This should be done twice every week.  Don’t give up if your pet doesn’t seem willing to have its teeth brushed. 

Also, certain pet foods actually help plaque/tartar removal, so you can look for that in stores.  Ask your pet’s doctor for any advice.  Good luck and spread the word!

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Cure Gingivitis Before It Causes Bad Breath and Tooth Loss

Monday, February 1st, 2010

gingivitis

Gingivitis is a general term for different types of infections in the gingiva. Bad breath-causing bacteria cause gingivitis, so it is important to keep the oral cavity clean. By exercising proper oral hygiene, you can clean up any gingivitis that you have and prevent it from occuring.

You should brush at least 2-3 times a day, and it is also important that you use a decent toothpaste. PerioTherapy is excellent for those with periodontal infections. Flossing is very important because it gets rid of the plaque between the teeth. Generally, you should floss twice a day (at least once for sure) before you brush your teeth. Try using oral rinse every day (preferably twice at least), since this can reach areas that your dental floss and toothbrush do not reach. A tongue scraper will eradicate bacteria from the tongue. Also, after you use a tongue scraper and toothbrush, make sure to rinse them with hot water.

If left untreated, gingivitis can be really severe and turn into gum disease. Bleeding, swollen, and painful gums all can occur, as well as tooth loss that could allegedly lead to heart disease. If you are dedicated to curing your gingivitis and doing the right procedure, you can get rid of this oral health problem and potentially the bad breath that goes along with it. It not only depends on your dentist, but it also depends on your habits and the oral care products you use.

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Pregnant Mothers with Bad Breath May Be Fatal for Babies

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

stillbirths bad breath

Unfortunately, pregnant women with bad breath may have a problem that is staggering in its implications.  Previously, we have discussed the relationship between gum disease and reproductive health (pregnancy gingivitis), which can result in a baby being born prematurely.  Research shows that the bad breath-causing bacteria may even be linked to stillbirths.

Allegedly, the oral bacteria can be transferred to the placenta if it enters the blood stream through open sores in the gums.  The unborn child is not equipped to fight the disease with its immune system in the same manner an adult can. 

Since bleeding gums/pregnancy gingivitis is extremely common among pregnant women, it is vital that expecting mothers brush and floss frequently during the day, after snacks and meals.  Surgery may be needed for serious infections. 

Whereas pregnancy gingivitis is common, the possibility of having a stillbirth is not.  Nonetheless, taking healthy steps will make pregnancy easier and reduce anxiety levels.  Here are some tips for practicing good oral hygiene:

– Go to the dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.
– Brush your teeth at least 2-3 times a day, ideally after every meal and snack.  This prevents plaque/tartar building up.
– Floss after every meal.
– Use an oral rinse (like TheraBreath) at least 2 times a day. 
– Use a tongue scraper to prevent the bad breath-causing bacteria from building up.
– Eat healthier (more vegetables, less sweets).

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Periodontal Disease and its Stages

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

Many people (usually around 3 out of 4!) have symptoms of periodontal disease, which is an infection of the tissues supporting your teeth.  These symptoms include persistent bad breath; bleeding gums (especially when you brush); red, swollen, and tender gums; gums that recede from the teeth; pus between the teeth and gums when the gums are pressed; permanent teeth that are loose or separating; changes in your dental structure when biting; and changes in the way dentures fit.  Health gums have a healthy pink color, they do not bleed, and the gum line hugs the teeth tightly. 

 

Here are the various stages of periodontal disease:

1)  Gingivitis:  The gums bleed easily when you brush, floss, or probe them.  The gums are inflamed and sensitive to touch, and there is the possibility of halitosis and bad taste.  The gums between the teeth may look bluish-red in color.

2) Early Periodontitis: The gums may start pulling away from the teeth, and the inflammation and bleeding of the gums is more noticeable.  There is bad breath and bad taste , slight loss of bone (horizontally on X-ray), and there may be pockets of 3-4mm between the teeth and gums.

3) Moderate Periodontitis: The gum may boil, and abscesses may develop.  Since the gums are receding, the teeth appear to look longer.  The front teeth may start to drift, showing spaces.  The person suffering often has chronic bad breath, bad taste, and both horizontal and angular bone loss (on X-ray).  The pockets between the gum and teeth range from 4-6mm deep.

4) Advanced Periodontitis: The teeth become loose or mobile.  Bad breath and bad taste are chronic, and the roots of the teeth are exposed and extra-sensitive to hot and cold temperatures.  On X-ray, there is severe angular and horizontal bone loss, and the pockets between the gum line and teeth are more than 6mm deep.

Gum Disease Cure

So what should you do if you are having any of these symptoms?  You should definitely go and get diagnosed and your teeth cleaned by your dentist.  Also, a good gingivitis cure is PerioTherapy, which is a product line that focuses on gum care.  Try it out!

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