Archive for the ‘periodontitis’ Category

Periodontal Disease may Influence Respiratory Health

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

262068_7849Your entire body works on its own to maintain function and a healthy system, so it should come as no surprise that what goes on in your mouth will have a lasting effect on the rest of the body. For example, did you know that periodontal disease can lead to respiratory problems? According to a study published in the Journal of Periodontology, researchers found a strong link between the two, which could possibly be a result of the increased amount of anaerobic bacteria in the mouth.

Researchers studied a pool of 14,000 patients from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey, all of whom were at least 20 years old and still had at least six natural teeth. Each person was examined for their lung, dental and periodontal health, and they were questioned regarding their respiratory health. When comparing data, the researchers found a direct link between people who had poor oral health as well as lowered respiratory health. An individual with poor oral health was characterized as someone who had bleeding gums, gingival recession and periodontal attachment level. Appropriate adjustments were made based on age, income, race and frequency of dental visits.

“It’s possible that people with periodontal disease and chronic lung disease might find their lung disease perhaps worse than if they did not have periodontal disease,” study author Frank Scannapieco, an associate professor of oral biology at the University of Buffalo School of Dental Medicine, said. “It could be that bacteria in the mouth somehow travel into the lower airway and contribute to the inflammatory process that is involved into the progression of chronic lung disease. It’s also possible that inflammatory mediators in the saliva may somehow play a role in the process.”

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What’s the Deal with Hydrogen Peroxide?

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

184540_6193Hydrogen peroxide is one of those items that almost everyone has in their medicine cabinet, and it can actually be a great solution for many things. Whether you have a cut on your hand, need to whiten your clothes or want to wipe down mirrors without streaks, hydrogen peroxide can get the job done. It also has many benefits for your mouth, and it is widely, safely and effectively used in dental practices today. Most notably, the solution is used as a home remedy for teeth whitening.

A recent article published in Registered Dental Hygienist reported that the product can be used to treat periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease. In 1913, dentists started using hydrogen peroxide to decrease the amount of dental plaque on teeth and to control gum disease, and it can still be used today. Hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen, which is a powerful antimicrobial action. If hydrogen peroxide can be held in place along the gum line and within the periodontal pockets that appear in those with gum disease, it can penetrate the slime matrix that protects biofilm and then removes bacterial cell walls; however, it needs as least 10 minutes to do so.

The study followed four patients who were suffering from different stages of periodontal disease, and each were given doses of hydrogen peroxide for at least 10 minutes. Depending on the clinical level of each patient’s illness, the time frame of the dosage was increased. Patients received 10-minute dosages either two times a day, or four times a day for five weeks, or 15-minute dosages six times a day for two weeks. After using the solution for the designated amount of time, all four patients had no bleeding when dentists probed the gums as well as no or less bacterial sites.

While hydrogen peroxide does not have the same powers as antiseptics, it works to clear away debris through oxidation, which is why it is very effective for getting rid of dental plaque. Additionally, this may mean that hydrogen peroxide can be used as a tool against bad breath because it prevents bacteria buildup in the mouth if used on a regular basis.

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Naturally Fight Gum Disease

Friday, March 15th, 2013

iStock_000014107868XSmallWhen it comes to the mouth, there are countless reasons why taking proper care of it is pertinent to your overall health. From the social side effects of having bad breath to the condition of the mouth illnesses like gum disease leave behind, overlooking oral health can have a lasting effect on the rest of our body and mind. Luckily, many oral health issues can be remedied or reversed if they haven’t reached high severity.

Knowing the signs
According to the book Reversing Gum Disease Naturally, an estimated 40 million Americans suffer from periodontal disease. The roots of the teeth work to support healthy growth and stability, but once the bone begins to erode, the teeth become loose and have a higher probability of falling out. The first sign of gum disease is when the tissues become swollen, tender, and loose or even bleed while brushing. When the tissues that support the tooth are loose, it is easier for food particles and bacteria to gather around the base of the tooth. You may also notice that your gums are receding, which is a result of bone and gum loss.

Symptoms of gum disease may also include halitosis. Although halitosis causes include food consumption, dry mouth and allergies, it can also be a sign that the bacteria in the mouth are releasing a volatile smell.

Heal it
Once you begin to see these warning signs, there are plenty of ways that you can begin to reverse the harmful effects. The first step is to maintain a regular oral health regimen of brushing, flossing and rinsing with alcohol free mouthwash. Doing these three practices at least twice a day will help keep bacteria at bay, the breath smelling fresh and the teeth a pearly white.

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Studies Show Most People Have Some Sign of Gum Disease

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

With 70 percent of people over the age of 36 showing signs of periodontal disease, dental professionals must consistently communicate to their patients the significance of prevention or halting gum disease in its early stages. Over the past few decades, the dentistry profession has made significant progress in eliminating cavities. However, gum disease remains a significant, but preventable and treatable health threat to the public (1, 12).

Prior to the onset of periodontal or gum disease, many patients experience gingivitis. Gingivitis represents a “mild form of gum disease” and starts as inflammation of the gums. Typically, the patient has red or swollen gums, which may bleed when the person brushes his or her teeth. Although some people may experience gum irritation, the teeth remain tightly rooted in the sockets.

Gum disease starts with the accumulation of bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria mix with mucus, food particles and other organic matter, which cause a build-up of plaque. Failure to remove plaque, by brushing and flossing, results in the material hardening into calculus or tartar. The person cannot remove tartar by brushing. The condition requires a deep cleaning by a dental hygienist or dentist.

When left untreated, gingivitis becomes progressively worse and may escalate into periodontitis. Periodontal inflammation affects the ligaments and bones, which surround the teeth and provide support. When teeth lose their support, they become loose and fall out (2).

TheraBreath recommends our PerioTherapy Oral Rinse formula, which attacks anaerobic bacteria associated with the initial stages of gum disease. Many patients combine the PerioTherapy Oral Rinse with Periotherapy toothpaste treatment and use of a Hydrofloss for a highly effective three-prong approach to preventing gum disease.

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Check Out a New Infographic on Periodontal Disease and Cures for Gingivitis

Thursday, April 5th, 2012


Gum disease is much more common than you might think, and it can lead to major health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental

Infographic: Oral Health vs. Overall Health by 1Dental.com

It’s not so tough to think about bad breath, ruminate on gum disease or visualize the specialty cures for gingivitis. But can you do it all at once? It might help to have a nice infographic to look at, which is exactly what the folks at 1Dental have made.

The handy chart covers a lot of the bases that we regularly discuss here at TheraBreath. However, if you think it’s only about halitosis and the occasional oral-odor-related faux pas, you’re in for a surprise.

The fact is, gum disease, periodontitis and other serious oral health problems can do much more than foul up your breath. They can also increase your risk for some dire chronic illnesses, making cures for gingivitis more critical than ever.

For starters, the infographic notes that as many as one-half of all Americans have some level of gum disease, while a smaller fraction – between 5 and 10 percent – have serious gingivitis, or even periodontal disease.

As is immediately obvious when you take a peek at the page, these gum diseases come with some nasty baggage:

– People with periodontitis are four times more likely to develop pneumonia, compared to those without the gum condition.

– Fully 95 percent of people with diabetes have periodontal disease!

– Gum disease can contribute to lung infections and chronic pulmonary conditions.

– Mothers-to-be with periodontal disease have a sevenfold greater chance of giving birth prematurely or having an underweight baby.

Check out the infographic for more in that vein, as well as for ways to improve your dental health and avoid gum disease. The risks associated with periodontal disease are some of the very reasons that we’ve been recommending PerioTherapy for years. By fighting bad breath and attending to your gum health today, you may be able to avoid serious risks tomorrow.

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