Archive for the ‘periodontal disease’ Category

Link Shown Between Oral Bacteria and Joint Infection

Thursday, September 19th, 2013

STKT-PER-286Doctors and scientists have long been concerned about a link between oral bacteria and joint health. In 2012, researchers studied a small group of participants who suffered from periodontal disease and joint disease, some of whom had joint replacements. Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine questioned the DNA of bacteria from the lubricant fluid in hip and knee joints, which is called synovial fluid. Then, the dental plaque of the patients with periodontal disease was also examined.

Case Western study
In the study “Identification of Oral Bacterial DNA in Synovial Fluid of Patients with Arthritis with Native and Failed Prosthetic Joints,” researchers examined 36 participants, five of whom had a direct link between the DNA of his or her dental plaque and the bacteria in the joints. Eleven of the participants had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 25 were diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) during the time of the study. Of these participants, eight with OA and one with RA had failed prosthetics. Bacterial DNA was detected in five patients with failed prosthetic or native joints, and two of those individuals were identified to have gum disease and identical bacterial clones between the joint and mouth. This study showed a possible link between gum disease and failed joints; however, the findings were not substantial enough to make definitive claims.

The dental plaque that was tracked during the study is the cause of inflammation in the mouth, which, once in the bloodstream, can cause kidney and heart disease, cancer or even premature births or fetal deaths.

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What’s the Deal with Hydrogen Peroxide?

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

184540_6193Hydrogen peroxide is one of those items that almost everyone has in their medicine cabinet, and it can actually be a great solution for many things. Whether you have a cut on your hand, need to whiten your clothes or want to wipe down mirrors without streaks, hydrogen peroxide can get the job done. It also has many benefits for your mouth, and it is widely, safely and effectively used in dental practices today. Most notably, the solution is used as a home remedy for teeth whitening.

A recent article published in Registered Dental Hygienist reported that the product can be used to treat periodontal disease, more commonly known as gum disease. In 1913, dentists started using hydrogen peroxide to decrease the amount of dental plaque on teeth and to control gum disease, and it can still be used today. Hydrogen peroxide releases oxygen, which is a powerful antimicrobial action. If hydrogen peroxide can be held in place along the gum line and within the periodontal pockets that appear in those with gum disease, it can penetrate the slime matrix that protects biofilm and then removes bacterial cell walls; however, it needs as least 10 minutes to do so.

The study followed four patients who were suffering from different stages of periodontal disease, and each were given doses of hydrogen peroxide for at least 10 minutes. Depending on the clinical level of each patient’s illness, the time frame of the dosage was increased. Patients received 10-minute dosages either two times a day, or four times a day for five weeks, or 15-minute dosages six times a day for two weeks. After using the solution for the designated amount of time, all four patients had no bleeding when dentists probed the gums as well as no or less bacterial sites.

While hydrogen peroxide does not have the same powers as antiseptics, it works to clear away debris through oxidation, which is why it is very effective for getting rid of dental plaque. Additionally, this may mean that hydrogen peroxide can be used as a tool against bad breath because it prevents bacteria buildup in the mouth if used on a regular basis.

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Naturally Fight Gum Disease

Friday, March 15th, 2013

iStock_000014107868XSmallWhen it comes to the mouth, there are countless reasons why taking proper care of it is pertinent to your overall health. From the social side effects of having bad breath to the condition of the mouth illnesses like gum disease leave behind, overlooking oral health can have a lasting effect on the rest of our body and mind. Luckily, many oral health issues can be remedied or reversed if they haven’t reached high severity.

Knowing the signs
According to the book Reversing Gum Disease Naturally, an estimated 40 million Americans suffer from periodontal disease. The roots of the teeth work to support healthy growth and stability, but once the bone begins to erode, the teeth become loose and have a higher probability of falling out. The first sign of gum disease is when the tissues become swollen, tender, and loose or even bleed while brushing. When the tissues that support the tooth are loose, it is easier for food particles and bacteria to gather around the base of the tooth. You may also notice that your gums are receding, which is a result of bone and gum loss.

Symptoms of gum disease may also include halitosis. Although halitosis causes include food consumption, dry mouth and allergies, it can also be a sign that the bacteria in the mouth are releasing a volatile smell.

Heal it
Once you begin to see these warning signs, there are plenty of ways that you can begin to reverse the harmful effects. The first step is to maintain a regular oral health regimen of brushing, flossing and rinsing with alcohol free mouthwash. Doing these three practices at least twice a day will help keep bacteria at bay, the breath smelling fresh and the teeth a pearly white.

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Some Dental Students are Clueless about Bad Breath

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

It’s easy to rely on your dentist or dental hygienist to recognize when your breath stinks. After all, you’d think they’d be the experts; the people who can tell you about it honestly, explain where it comes from and make recommendations on eliminating it. But a new survey has found that many dental students know next to nothing about bad breath.

This is why it’s best to see a dentist and a breath specialist, who can focus on your oral odor and point you to some specialty breath fresheners that will actually treat the problem.

Where does bad breath come from?

You might think that a pop quiz over the origins and treatments of halitosis would be a piece of cake, right? But evidently, it’s not – for laypersons or dentistry students. That’s one of the conclusions reached by the administrators of a survey, whose results appeared in the Portuguese Journal of Stomatology, Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery.

To be fair, researchers asked about tough subjects like organoleptic scores and gram-negative microorganisms, but they also included easy questions, like:

- Which region of the body does bad breath usually come from? Only 22 percent of the dozens of respondents said the tongue, which is the correct answer. More than 40 percent said the stomach!

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Studies Show Most People Have Some Sign of Gum Disease

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

With 70 percent of people over the age of 36 showing signs of periodontal disease, dental professionals must consistently communicate to their patients the significance of prevention or halting gum disease in its early stages. Over the past few decades, the dentistry profession has made significant progress in eliminating cavities. However, gum disease remains a significant, but preventable and treatable health threat to the public (1, 12).

Prior to the onset of periodontal or gum disease, many patients experience gingivitis. Gingivitis represents a “mild form of gum disease” and starts as inflammation of the gums. Typically, the patient has red or swollen gums, which may bleed when the person brushes his or her teeth. Although some people may experience gum irritation, the teeth remain tightly rooted in the sockets.

Gum disease starts with the accumulation of bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria mix with mucus, food particles and other organic matter, which cause a build-up of plaque. Failure to remove plaque, by brushing and flossing, results in the material hardening into calculus or tartar. The person cannot remove tartar by brushing. The condition requires a deep cleaning by a dental hygienist or dentist.

When left untreated, gingivitis becomes progressively worse and may escalate into periodontitis. Periodontal inflammation affects the ligaments and bones, which surround the teeth and provide support. When teeth lose their support, they become loose and fall out (2).

TheraBreath recommends our PerioTherapy Oral Rinse formula, which attacks anaerobic bacteria associated with the initial stages of gum disease. Many patients combine the PerioTherapy Oral Rinse with Periotherapy toothpaste treatment and use of a Hydrofloss for a highly effective three-prong approach to preventing gum disease.

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