Archive for the ‘periodontal disease’ Category

Scared of Receding Gums? Here’s What You Should Know

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

scared receding gums

Worried that your gum line is gradually eroding? There are ways to help.

Gum recession, where the margin of gum tissue that surrounds the teeth wears away, is a fairly common dental problem. Most people don’t realize they have it because it occurs over a long period of time. However, when gums pull back and expose more of the tooth, pockets start to form between the teeth and the gum line. This makes it easy for disease-causing bacteria to accumulate.

Causes of gum recession
The first way to take action is to know what triggers gums recession.

Periodontal diseases: Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis (early stage gum disease) and periodontitis (late stage gum disease) are the main causes of gum recession. These bacterial gum infections destroy tissue and supporting bones that hold your teeth in place.

Aggressive tooth brushing: People who hold their brushes too firmly and scrub too hard or the wrong way may cause tooth enamel to wear away and gums to recede. It’s also important to replace toothbrushes or tooth heads for electric toothbrushes every two to three months, since bacteria can start to gather on bristles.

Inadequate dental care: Not visiting the dentist enough combined with insufficient brushing and flossing fosters plaque buildup, which turns into tartar, the hard substance that can only be removed by a professional dental cleaning.

Genes: Due to genetic factors, some people are more susceptible to gum disease. Research suggests that 30 percent of the population may be predisposed to gum disease, no matter how well they care for their teeth.

Tobacco products: Cigarettes, cigars, chew and other tobacco products are a big culprit of gum disease, since the chemicals create sticky plaque that damages teeth. In addition, it may cause dry mouth, tooth decay and smoker’s breath.

Hormonal changes: Varying hormone levels associated with life events such as puberty, menstruation, pregnancy or menopause can make gums more sensitive and vulnerable to gum recession. (more…)

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Red Wine as a Cavity Fighter

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

red wine cavity fighterGreat news for oenophiles: You might have heard that red wine benefits the heart, but a recent study suggests that drinking a glass of red wine a day may also prevent cavities.

For the study, which was published in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers grew bacterial cultures related to dental diseases, namely Streptococcus mutans. Then, they dipped them into different liquids including red wine, red wine without alcohol, red wine spiked with grape seed extract and water with 12 percent ethanol.

Red wine with or without alcohol as well as wine with grape seed extract proved the best at getting rid of bacteria. By fighting off odorous anaerobic bacteria with non-alcoholic red wine, you could also help avoid bad breath.

Dental diseases are extremely prevalent not only in the U.S., but throughout the world. An estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population is affected by cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss, according to the report. 

The problem originates when harmful bacteria in the mouth gather to form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that produce acid and plaque that damages the walls of the teeth. Of course, brushing with toothpastes that contain fluoride, flossing and rinsing your mouth out with alcohol-free mouthwash can help kill the bacterial plaque.  (more…)

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Study: 1 in 10 Americans have Diabetes

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

diabetes dry mouth gum disease

The percentage of Americans with diabetes has almost doubled since 1988, new research shows. Now a staggering 21 million adults in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the blood glucose disease, which has a potent ability to affect their oral health.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the rate of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was 5.5 percent. By 2010, that number jumped to 9.3 percent, according to the new report.

For the study, which was published in the April 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. This included more than 43,000 adults followed from the first survey period (1988 to 1994) to the most recent (1999 to 2010). From 1988 to 1994, the rate of diagnosed diabetes was 5.5 percent. By the next survey in 1999 to 2004, that number had leapt to 7.6 percent. In the most recent survey, which looked at data from 2005 to 2010, the prevalence of diabetes rose to 9.3 percent.

“Diabetes has increased dramatically,” Dr. Elizabeth Selvin, associate professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the study’s lead author, told HealthDay. “The rates have almost doubled since the late ’80s and early ’90s.”

Understanding diabetes Diabetes is a disorder that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than average. When you consume food and drinks, the body normally breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is an essential fuel source for cells. However, for the 21 million Americans with the disease, the body has trouble regulating insulin, the hormone responsible for transferring the sugar from the blood to the cells as nourishment.

There are two main forms of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and usually develops during adulthood, while Type 1 typically occurs in children and young adults, affecting roughly 5 percent of people who have the disease.

(more…)

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Gum Disease Almost 100 Percent Preventable

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

gingivitisDo you wear sunscreen on blistering hot days? Do you buckle your seat belt when going on a road trip? Like these measures, taking care of your gums and teeth marks the benefits of preventative care. Think ahead of time. Not only will staying on top of your gum health ward off unwanted accidents, it might also keep money in the bank later on.

The early stage of gum disease, called gingivitis, is the inflammation of your gums. Red tissue, receding gum lines and bleeding gums after brushing are all telltale signs of gingivitis. This occurs when plaque is allowed to accumulate in the pockets between where your teeth meet the gums. Plaque contains bacteria, which produce toxins that slowly eat away at the tissue. Although gums may be irritated at this point, teeth remain firmly planted in their sockets, and no irreversible bone damage has occurred yet.

If left untreated, however, gingivitis may progress to periodontal disease, or advanced-stage gum disease. At this point, the inner layer of the gum and bone begin to pull away from teeth, creating small pockets. The deeper the pockets, the more space bacteria have to grow.

At its nastiest, gum disease can result in the loss of teeth as well as the bones that support the teeth.

Biggest causes of gum diseases:
• Tobacco products: Smoking, chewing and any other use of tobacco has been shown as one of the leading causes of gum disease. The chemicals in tobacco leave harmful bacteria in the mouth, which erodes the gum tissue. When this happens, smoker’s breath might be the least of one’s concerns. Cigarettes, cigars and pipes contribute to gingivitis and periodontitis.

(more…)

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New Oral Care Appliance Helps Fight Gum Disease

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

ACCS-MSC-128On the whole, people care about their teeth – what they look like, how they feel and how white they can get. However, our pearlies are only half the equation of a healthy smile, as our gums play a larger role than we might think.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 50 percent of American adults have gum disease. This consists of both gingivitis – the inflammation of the gums (early stage), and periodontal disease (advanced stage).

Gum disease is an infection of the tissues that keep your teeth in place. More often than not, it is triggered by poor brushing and flossing habits that allow plaque and anaerobic bacteria to stick onto the teeth. The main area of infection is where the teeth meet the gums, or the gum pockets. The bigger the pockets, the larger amount of space bacteria has to take shelter. If left untreated, the gingivitis can turn into advanced-stage gum disease. Gradually, a patient’s gums erode; the teeth loosen, and may even fall out.  Today, more people lose their teeth due to gum disease than tooth decay.

(more…)

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